Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Adventure and Wilderness

The climate crisis has arrived – so stop feeling guilty and start imagining your future

Evidence of the devastating impacts of anthropogenic climate change are stacking up, and it is becoming horrifyingly real. There can be no doubt that the climate crisis has arrived. Yet another “shocking new study” led The Guardian and various other news media this week. One-third of Himalayan ice cap, they report, is doomed.

Meanwhile in Australia, record summer temperatures have wrought unprecedented devastation of biblical proportions – mass deaths of horses, bats and fish are reported across the country, while the island state of Tasmania burns. In some places this version of summer is a terrifying new normal.

The climate disaster future is increasingly becoming the present – and, as the evidence piles up, it is tempting to ask questions about its likely public reception. Numerous psychological perspectives suggest that if we have already invested energy in denying the reality of a situation we experience as profoundly troubling, the closer it gets, the more effort we put into denying it.

While originally considered as a psychological response, denial and other defence mechanisms we engage in to keep this reality at bay and maintain some sense of “normality” can also be thought of as interpersonal, social and cultural. Because our relationships, groups and wider cultures are where we find support in not thinking, talking and feeling about that crisis. There are countless strategies for maintaining this state of knowing and not-knowing – we are very inventive …

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. max

    February 12, 2019 at 12:05 pm

    The environment department is supposed to be a regulator and protector of our environment, yet it’s holding Adani’s hand through the approvals process to get the Carmichael mega coalmine off the ground. The Great Australian Bight may have oil, so permits will be granted to exploit the area.

    The LibLab coalition has no conception of climate change. If there are any fossil fuels available they must be exploited.

    The survival of all species, or for that matter the world, takes second place to Big Business. The world can going to hell in a hand-basket as long as the economy is booming from the exploitation of fossil fuels. The Lib section of the LibLab coalition will let banks steal from farmers and dead people, but warns us to beware of unions because they are thugs. The LibLabs lock people up in indefinite detention, not because they are criminals but because they were trying to escape a life-threatening situation.

    The climate crisis has arrived – so stop feeling guilty and start imagining your future. How is it possible to imagine our future? Soon we will be forced to vote and the major parties are here for the here-and-now, without the slightest thought of any future except their own.

    Somehow we must put pressure on the major parties because they will drag us down with them if we don’t. I can only suggest that we do so at the ballot box.

  2. Russell

    February 12, 2019 at 9:22 am

    In other words, stop talking and do something about it!

    And pressure governments to do the bulk of it. They are OUR servants, NOT the other way around, hence “public servants”, and they are supposed to do what we as a majority want for the benefit of ALL – that is for the BEST outcome, NOT a lesser compromise.

    I grow almost all my own food, live completely off-grid, have heavily insulated my home, collect all my rainwater for personal and garden use, don’t bring any plastic waste home (except what other people senselessly discard), don’t buy ANY junk foods (they are the largest producers of waste) and will shortly be making my own bio-fuel.

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