Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

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Photos reveal Queensland cotton farms full of water while Darling River runs dry

Photographs taken by Centre Alliance senator Rex Patrick of cotton farms on the Moonie River in southern Queensland. The South Australian royal commission into the Murray Darling Basin plan is expected to deliver a scathing assessment of the plan that was meant to save the river system from ecological disaster. Photograph: Rex Patrick

Over the border in NSW, the Barwon and Darling rivers are a series of muddy pools, and fish are dying …

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Russell

    February 1, 2019 at 10:11 am

    All cotton and rice farm water allocations should be revoked until the whole system recovers, otherwise you won’t have any water at all, and my guess is that those who live along the dried up rivers, streams and creeks will eventually take things into their own hands.

    Meanwhile some whinging, greedy Queenslanders are blaming water buy-backs for their business downturns, and not acknowledging the drought which has been going on there for some years.

    And further north, those who stupidly chose to build on floodplains whinge about heavy rains from a tropical low!

    Ever heard of Global Warming/Climate Change?

    This nation is full of morons who have absolutely no connection with, or understanding of, our land.

  2. kimpeart

    February 1, 2019 at 7:36 am

    In the age of global heating, with tougher droughts and fiercer fires, what should we do better?

    Do my suggestions to Stephanie Boys stack up?

    Warnings of towns being shut or losing drinking water over implementing Murray Darling Basin report
    Stephanie Borys, 1 February 2019, ABC News Online
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-01/warnings-from-the-murray-darling-basin-royal-commission/10768818

    Dear Stephanie,

    The river crisis has been likened to the loss of the Aral Sea, where the water was taken for farming.

    The Dead Sea has dropped 40.5 metres since 1930, and is falling by a metre a year.

    Moves are now underway, at a cost of $2 billion, to pump desalinated Red Sea water to the Dead Sea to stop the level falling, and maybe raise it some.

    Tumbling into the era of global heating, and with agricultural needs and wishes to meet, should we consider pumping desalinated water from the sea to the farms, and maybe top up the rivers too, when they run low?

    Power for this could be provided by solar thermal power stations, which would work well in Australia’s rather hot heart.

    Over time, such a program could be expanded to pump water to any location in Australia, creating many green oases, with water also on hand to fight fires, and top up hydro dams, when too low.

    This could be a national infrastructure project.

    Costs could also be returned from agricultural profits.

    We could apply this approach for Tasmania as well, to drought-proof this island, and ensure that hydro dams are topped up for power generation, and ample water is swiftly available to fight fires.

    In the age of global heating, we need a whole new approach to fighting fiercer fires.

    Yours sincerely,

    Kim Peart
    Director
    Space Pioneers Foundation
    Ross
    Tasmania

  3. kimpeart

    January 31, 2019 at 9:31 pm

    This river crisis has been likened to the loss of the Aral Sea where the water was taken for farming.

    The Dead Sea has dropped 40.5 metres since 1930, and is falling by a metre a year.

    Moves are now underway, at a cost of $2 billion, to pump desalinated Red Sea water to the Dead Sea to stop the level falling, and maybe raise it some.

    Tumbling into the era of global heating, and with agricultural needs and wishes to meet, should we consider pumping desalinated water from the sea to the rivers?

    Power for this could be provided by solar thermal power stations which would work well in Australia’s rather hot heart.

    Over time, such a program could be expanded to pump water to any location in Australia, creating many green oases, with water on hand to fight fires.

    We could also apply this to Tasmania to drought-proof this island, and to ensure that the dams are topped up for power generation.

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