Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Economy

Pimp/Porn inquiry needed in Tasmania

Discussion about prostitution laws in Tasmania reveals that politicians have been advised that Tasmania Police is aware of locations of “known brothels”, but turning a blind eye to illegal brothel operations and with it to the sexual violence to women associated with the sex trade.

On the 20th of November I met with Legislative Council Members, Rosemary Armitage and Ivan Dean to discuss measures to stop violence against women and children and sexploitation in Tasmania.

My goal was to broaden the conversation, because if we are to consider new laws we need to address sexual violence, prostitution and culturally accepted male demand.

Sexual violence is on the rise in Tasmania and we need to examine its root causes. Sexual violence has in the past been culturally endorsed by excuses such as: “some men are just violent”, “women have rape fantasies”, “and men are provoked or can’t control their urges”. This cultural endorsement of male violence needs to be challenged and reversed.

Negative masculinity and men’s control of women have been identified as the main reasons leading to male sexual violence. Widespread use of violent pornography needs to be acknowledged as a causative factor in cases of sexual assault and rape. The availability of pornography on the internet is having an increasingly adverse effect on sexuality and especially so for young people. When we understand porn as a cultural tool, which shapes ideas about our sexuality and about domination and submission, we can then implement new strategies through education and legislation to address sexual assault.

As a first step, we need a parliamentary enquiry in order to understand fully the negative impacts of pornography within our community. We are compelled to ask: how many violent men watch porn, how many children and teens are exposed to porn, how many copy these violent acts, how addictive is pornography, how does it affect relationships, does exposure to porn create demand for paid sex, how can we stop these harms?

Rosemary Armitage and Ivan Dean would be well advised to read Professor Bob Pease’s work on the importance of focusing on male demand.

During his International Women’s Day presentation at Parliament House in March this year he stated:

• Adherence to dominant forms of masculinity contributes to sexually coercive acts.

• The fantasy model for sex is pornography

• Sexism, sexual callousness, lack of empathy, sexual coerciveness and unequal relationships influence men’s desire for paid sex

In Tasmania the Sex Industry Offences Act 2005 regulates prostitution. Prostitution is legal but brothels and street prostitution are illegal. Self employed operators are legal but are limited to two people working in one premise. Of course in reality this looks quite different: some premises are known as brothels and more than two women are known to operate from these premises. It has been alleged that Asian women have been brought into Tasmania to work in ‘massage parlours’ (brothel fronts), sell sex and are advertised in local papers.

If the Labor Party wins the next election they will push to scrap the Sex Industry Offences Act 2005 and introduce legislation for full decriminalisation. Full decriminalisation was seen in the past as a harm reduction approach, protecting prostituted women from police, supporting health prevention and combating stigma. Today the effects of full decriminalisation in places such as New Zealand have produced increased profits for men who own the majority of brothels, strip clubs and escort agencies. Further exploitation of poor and disadvantaged women (including greater number of Indigenous, Pacifika and Asian women) has been reported. There has been a normalisation of sexism, sexual callousness and growth in demand for paid sex which is often more violent or unsafe. Stigma has not been reduced.

Compounding the harm is absolutely zero funding to support women who want to exit prostitution, who found themselves pressured, coerced or in need of support with reporting abuse or rape occurring “at work”. Women’s Health Tasmania has failed to take any initiatives in support of exit programs in Tasmania. This is indicative of their flawed belief that the sex trade is fully and always consensual, has no impact and harms no one. How an organisation such as Women’s Health Tasmania can be funded by Government beggars belief.

Both Armitage and Dean – in my view – aren’t fully aware of the harms done to both the prostituted and to society at large – a society that accepts men’s rights to purchase women. Armitage and Dean gave me various anecdotal “positive” stories: about a young woman who put herself through a university degree thanks to prostitution; about a good looking mother to whom prostitution offered flexibility; to an overcrowded premises (brothel?) known to police in Launceston. Any verification of these anecdotes was not provided and it is well known that sex trade front groups use people with vested interests to promote their agenda.

Tasmanian girls and women should never have to consider prostitution as an option to sustain themselves economically. Universities need to be free and mothers provided with adequate income, housing, health and children’s services.

This should not be seen as either radical or idealistic thinking but essential to justice for women. Prostitution has been presented as purely entrepreneurial and “under control” in Tasmania. Its existence necessary to fulfil demand by males who otherwise would assault or rape “other women”. Politicians need better understanding of the reasons why people (mostly women) enter prostitution and why people buy sex (vast majority of whom are men).This is precisely what was examined in Sweden before the introduction of a law that doesn’t criminalise the selling of sex but the buying of sex. The law went hand in hand with funding for exit programs, education and counselling programs. This was seen as a way to bring cultural awareness and change and it has succeeded.

To date in Tasmania, there has been no public reporting on sex trade operations compliance with OH&S, Sex Industry Offences Act 2005 and Divisions 270 and 271 of the Commonwealth Criminal Code Act 1995 (Criminal Code) by Worksafe Tasmania, Tasmania Police and the Australian Federal Police. It is not known how many women work for themselves or for pimps or might have been trafficked and what is the full impact of such work on their long term health and safety. It is not known how much and what type of grooming and coercion is employed to work in the sex trade. It is not known how many experience violence or rape and whether reports to police are made. It is not known who owns the premises at which sex trade businesses operate from, whether it is one person or a consortium (and if there are any connections to law enforcement, illegal operations or organised crime) and how much do they profit from prostitution.

While prostitution has become normalised in some societies, women’s human rights groups across the globe are challenging this multi billion dollar trade. The myths perpetuated about prostitution continually fail to address the vulnerability and harms to anyone who enters the sex trade.

Armitage and Dean disagreed that the current laws need changing but concluded the meeting with an invitation to present further information on the Nordic model to the Legislative Council in the near future.

There seems to be at least openness for continued discussion and debate on the third legislative option on prostitution, adopted by countries such as Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Ireland, Canada and recently France.

*Joanna Pinkiewicz is an activist working on women’s rights issues and environmental issues. Currently working as a researcher and campaigner for Nordic Model Coalition Australia.

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47 Comments

47 Comments

  1. Christopher Nagle

    December 6, 2017 at 8:03 pm

    As I read through this thread, I get the sense that the Nordic model attracts more than its fair share of unreconstructed sexists, but I suspect also Scarlet Alliance spoofs.

    A link put out by #26 is a Scarlet Alliance propaganda talk which from my listening, is simply a whinge about how the Nordic system undercuts the prostitution business model. And that is what I and the Swedish police love about it, much in the same way as incarcerating asylum seekers on Manus Island undercuts that of the snakeheads. And in both cases, it stops ‘the industry’ in its tracks; i.e., it can’t and doesn’t grow, unlike its decriminalizinging/deregulatory neighbours.

    From the evidence in places like Germany and the Netherlands, especially from the perspective of the police, who deal with prostitution and traficking on the ground, the decriminalization model has been an absolute dud, by any measure.

    And if the critics of this article were at all interested in that evidence, they would go to it, see the obvious and wisely say nothing.

    What we get here however is a farrago of gratuitous questioning of evidence, without actually leading any, which is the favourite tactic of dominant incumbents (although it would help the anti decriminalization case if their quoted stats were sourced and more care was made in their use, context and the reliance placed on them; e.g., in the US, the 12-14 average age of entry into prostitution is often quoted, but it is a notoriously fuzzy one, and in Australian, according to a 2003 Queensland government study, street workers were coming in at an average age of 19 and for brothel and private operators, more than six years senior to that).

    It may well be the case that a lot of school dropout street workers from grossly dysfunctional welfare backgrounds may start out early with promiscuous sex and opportunistically experimentation with sex-for-money as soon as they are able in early pubescence, but not make their living from it until they are somewhat older. But that needs to be spelt out.

    The Nordic opponents in this thread extrapolate from personal experience to industry generalization… and the myth of the ‘cheerful and well adapted girl on the game’.

    Again, there are huge differences in Australia between street workers and those in brothels and going private, in terms of drug use pattern, reasons for gravitating to the industry, socio-economic and other work background and educational attainment.

    And there maybe also considerable differences between the legal and illegal/criminal operators, particularly in relation to intimidatory ‘industrial relations’, trafficking and indentured bondage/imprisonment of Asian women.

    In places like Europe, there is a big criminal trafficking problem related to movement across very porous borders from poor eastern and south-eastern European countries into much more prosperous western ones, because the profits are so enormous.

    Sex ‘industry’ decriminalization has very likely turned trafficking in some areas into a virtual free market, brought into the brothel business all the major criminal players wanting an extra profit stream and venues for their drug pushing activities, and providing opportunity for criminal enterprises to be ‘respectable’ industry players using legitimate fronts to screen criminal activity and launder its proceeds. Very nice for gangs, but leaves the police tearing their hair out in a welter of very successful conflatory fudging and cribbing.

    At a larger level, what the ‘Scarlet Alliance’ is not talking about is the push to turn a furtive backyard trade into something similar to what has happened to the gambling industry, as part and parcel of the economic shift from manufacturing to services, tourism and ‘entertainment’.

    Economic mainstreaming has huge implications in terms of larger cultural impacts in making mass populations dependant on these rising institutions and the way they are able to colonize the infrastructure of sales and marketing.

    If the Scarlet Alliance gets its way, in ten years we may well have sex service advertising on our mainstream media just like the gaming industry. Why wouldn’t it?

    And that brings us back to the status of women and what has already happened to female gender politics in libertarian consumer societies over the last 70 years, which is to package them up as sexual icons of consumerism and ideological symbols of sex-on-demand. Mix that up with ‘Big Sex’ corporatism, and their status as sexual servants will be set in reinforced concrete.

    If I were a woman, I just cannot imagine anything more oppressive, intolerable or more likely to turn me into a really hard line fundamentalist puritan with a developing taste for insurgent warfare and the blood of my enemies.

  2. William Boeder

    December 6, 2017 at 3:52 pm

    #24. So the story goes, that most of the callers upon this young girl were patrons of a certain Hobart Hotel and would catch up on the local events about town.
    This has no reference to the average man on the street but far higher up in the State’s pecking order.
    This young lass was well capable of speaking openly about her prostitution activity, however, powers higher than logic and the pursuit of justice (given the amount of discretion available to Judges, DPP’s, Senior Counsel’s and other associated legalistic Bulldogs) this case matter was considered closed the basis given was to the effect upon the mind of the young girl were there to be an extensive court trial that could severely then negatively create a traumatic impact upon the mind of this particular young girl.
    In essence, the co-accused persons were exempted from the exposure of their identity that would have occurred were this matter of the co-accused to be acted upon and pursued through Tasmania’s Supreme Court.

  3. Isla MacGregor

    December 6, 2017 at 9:39 am

    The results of full decriminalisation in Germany from the organisation [b]Scientists for a World Without Prostitution[/b]:

    [i]The goal of the law, which is reportedly protecting and supporting women in prostitution, has failed completely — of these 400,000 women, only 44 are registered as sole proprietorship businesses.[6] More than half of these women work illegally, meaning they don’t have any social insurance and don’t have access to medical services in Germany. (1) So, even if they have the flu, they don’t have the possibility of visiting a doctor. There is a huge problem with pregnant women who can not pay for the abortion or birth their child in hospital. Very often, they abandon it.[7]

    And of course, this attracts the internationally organized crime. [b]Manfred Paulus, a police officer that has worked for over 30 years in this milieu says that the red light district is a highly criminal environment that is in the hands of criminal gangs.[/b] The people who made the law in 2002 have been totally naive: they allowed criminals to become recognized business men. And this criminality will of course not stay behind the doors of the brothels. The state has become a pimp of the most vulnerable women.[/b]

    [b]Paulus says that Germany with this law became an Eldorado for traffickers, pimps and brothel owners.[/b][8] The women who come from abroad and work in the red light district don´t get to know the Germany that the Germans know and appreciate. No, they are prisoners of a parallel society that is highly criminal.[9]…….[/i]

    More: http://www.trauma-and-prostitution.eu/en/2017/11/02/prostitution-can-not-be-regulated-it-has-to-be-abolished/#more-365

  4. Mentor in Prevention of Violence

    December 5, 2017 at 5:16 pm

    Please note that a highly regarded independent organisation that is endorsed by the French Ministry for Justice describes sexual exploitation as a global scourge.

    Such an organisation is dedicated to end the scourge and is especially concerned for the plight of children, and also the danger of child sex tourism which must be guarded against by all governments.

  5. Tony Stone

    December 5, 2017 at 12:52 pm

    “Why are homelessness and drug addiction most often pre-conditions for entry into the sex trade?”

    Prove it. As for street workers, many are junkies and only looking for their next hit and to lazy or hooked to get another job. But the majority working from home, or a business address, are there for the money and have no more addictions than the average person.

    In fact if you looked at it deeply, prostitutes using drugs, would be the same as the general population. The majority who are addicted to some form of useless medication.

    Have never met a prostitute that was homeless, some may have been at some time in their lives, but then again so are many males are homeless and in fact, there are many more homeless men than women, know that from real experience and the real statistics back it up.

    Provide verifiable statistics supporting this insane homeless belief, when the majority of real sex workers, live very good lives and have really nice homes.

    By the way, have never paid for sex in my life, never had to, but understand the reasons why others do, both male and female.

    “Why do 99% want desperately to get out of the trade?”

    Hilariously funny, you could say almost 99% of people would desperately love to get out of the industry or job they are in. It has nothing to do with the type of industry, it’s all to do with human psychology.

    Ever heard of a thing called a door, all you have to do is walk through it and you are out. Only the masochistic weak don’t take control of their lives and you find that in every industry and endeavour in life.

    The reality is, you are attacking me, simply because you hate the idea of a man having real experience and knowledge in this industry, compared to your zero experience, knowledge or understanding. You’ve probably never met a real sex worker, or talked to them.

    #40, the young blokes I knew and met on the streets, ended up there because of the relationship they had with the females of their families. A couple could no longer handle the beatings from enraged god nutter fathers, who took their anger out on their sons.

    Met a couple of young girls, who had been abused by the men in their families, but the irony was, the women never stood up for them, just accused them of being evil and lying. So they ran, to save themselves.

    It was the females of my family that locked me up in a religious home/jail, because I refused to believe in a mythical war god as my saviour.

    It allowed me to understand why my veteran father and others became a drunks and was never around, they couldn’t stand religion after their wartime experiences.

  6. Tony Stone

    December 5, 2017 at 12:36 pm

    #38 … “Many of your comments on TT Tony have been challenged and deleted by the Editor.”

    Now that’s a blatant lie, to the best of my knowledge, only 2 of my posts have been edited, none deleted and they were both in regard to this thread. Seems some don’t like facts being presented to them denouncing their claims, so they go on a hate filled vendetta with not one piece of truth to back them up and using bold type, rather childish in the extreme.

    The rest of your post is just a hate filled bitter rant, with not one piece of truth within it. Anyone with half a brain can see where the hate is coming from.

    As for trying to turn this thread into one about myself …

    Unlike you, I was putting forward real life experiences so others can see what you and your ilk demand is not the case, and that just shows how far from the truth you really are …

    #39 … “Why is the average age of entry into prostitution for girls 14 years of age?”

    Totally false, and there are no verifiable statistics anywhere on the planet supporting this insane claim.

    If that were case then the majority of world sex workers would be younger than 14 – and they are not. In this and other developed countries the average age of a sex worker is around 22.

    “Why do men not care if the person they are buying is a child or has been trafficked?”

    Nothing supports this contention in any way. Sexual trafficking is mostly carried out by those with religious affiliations, not real sane people.

    Those scum who abuse children deserve to be hanged in my opinion, and I would happily be the hangman considering my experiences as a child of religion.

    “Why is it that up to 85% of women who enter prostitution were sexually abused as children?”

    The majority of prostitutes learned little about sex from parents and more from personal experiences, that’s why more prostitutes come from religious families.

    Sex education was withheld and called evil, dirty, horrible. The facts are the opposite and if parents and especially mothers (as they have the most influence on children) educated their sons and daughters in sex properly, there would be little need for prostitutes and very little sexual abuse.

    As children of religion they may have experienced more sexual advances by elders and were more victimised because they didn’t fit the religious equation and so they generally initiated sexual activity at a younger age, probably had no further relationship with their first sexual partner, and experienced a higher incidence of forced sex because of their confusion and lack of knowledge.

    This is very common amongst religious families and has no relationship to men in general. From my experience in deeply religious families, it is the women who are the worst psychological and physical abusers of children and this forces them to take drastically different paths to their families. Of course it is the preachers and members of the church who follow closely behind families for psychological and sexual abuse.

    “ Why do over 68% of women who are prostituted have PTSD?”

    Product of their lifestyle situation caused by stress create by rabid feminists, religious nutters and government agencies. Not very peaceful when you are trying to earn a living and the cops, god nutters or rabid feminists are harassing you all the time.

    In my experience, which you don’t have, they were always on edge wondering when the cops would burst through the door, so naturally that can create extreme stress, leading to PTSD symptoms.

    There were many times when a tip-off came and there was big scramble to set things right for the bust, which included me getting lost for a time.

    “Why is psychological disassociation necessary to endure these unequal sexual transactions?”

    Psychological disassociation is common in many industries, and most people in repetitive industry suffer or use psychological disassociation as a means to overcome boredom and repetitiveness.

    In the sex industry it is very common as the majority are there for the money, not pleasure, and that’s why most get into prostitution – money and no other reason.

    Continued

  7. HP

    December 4, 2017 at 12:34 pm

    #39 … Well I have over 30 years visited probably 200 sex-workers including 2 or 3 I have visited regularly and exclusively for a couple of years, and my partner of 18 months is someone I originally had a paid arrangement with, yes just like the movie Pretty Woman. I have not detected the slightest whiff of any of the abuse you refer to.

  8. Lynne Newington

    December 3, 2017 at 6:13 pm

    #20 … Threads like this always interest me, having had a unique experience with prostitution over a few years as a young kid.

    I’m sorry to say as a mother, I see it as a criminal act exposing a child at that age with a unique experience such as yours. I wonder what the child within would say if given a voice?

    Maybe one day when you least expect it, it will come out to meet you and console you.

    If you can see the page I’m on … if not, not to worry – you will at the time.

    Meantime all power to you.

  9. Isla MacGregor

    December 3, 2017 at 4:48 pm

    37# … You are missing a lot:

    Why is the average age of entry into prostitution for girls 14 years of age?

    Why do men not care if the person they are buying is a child or has been trafficked?

    Why is it that up to 85% of women who enter prostitution were sexually abused as children?

    Why do over 68% of women who are prostituted have PTSD?

    Why is psychological disassociation necessary to endure these unequal sexual transactions?

    Why are homelessness and drug addiction most often pre-conditions for entry into the sex trade?

    Why do 99% want desperately to get out of the trade?

    Why doesn’t the Scarlet Alliance campaign for Exit Programs as essential to any changes in Sex Industry laws?

  10. Isla MacGregor

    December 3, 2017 at 4:08 pm

    Many of your comments on TT Tony have been challenged and deleted by the Editor.

    [b]It is of interest that the language of hate is routinely used by pimps, sex trade front groups and some who [i]use[/i] the identity of [i]sex worker[/i] against those who speak out about the evidence based research on the violence in the sex trade perpetrated by men against women, children, trans and men. The inescapable fact is that the violence is perpetrated by men. It is your problem if you wish to take offence at these facts. By turning this into a discussion about yourself and why you hate people who reveal these facts by using the language of hate against them are the same tactics trotted out by the pimp/porn lobby to ensure their violent global multi billion dollar trade is not shut down. Vested interests will go to extreme lengths to protect their assets – in this case male entitlement and privilege. In using the language of hate and anger you are doing nothing less than confirming to readers and reflecting the very abusive nature of prostitution. In simple words your language is the same hate speech that women are saturated with through advertising, porn and the global sex trade. It is the same hate speech that women endure through punternet sites and in prostitution. The abolitionist movement is rising all over the world and no wonder there will be a violent backlash just like we saw aginst the rise of feminism in the 70/80s. Since then and more men are joining with feminists and as feminist allies together we are gaining ground – many men are afraid of this and with fear comes the language of hate as your words so exemplify.[/b]

  11. HP

    December 3, 2017 at 4:08 pm

    So a middle added man feeling a bit lonely, unloved and unappreciated in his marriage contacts a sexworker. He has a shower, hands over $150, receives a covered BJ, sex, a massage and a chat and leaves 30minutes later with a spring in his step. The sexworker who’s calling is to nourish, enrich and generally improve people’s wellbeing is empowered by the transaction. Sexwork can be deeply rewarding, beautiful to experience and share and provides a safe, healthy outlet for unmet human desires. Or am I missing something? Maybe some of you guys should not try to make everything fit into your blinkered narrative.

  12. Invicta

    December 3, 2017 at 3:48 pm

    #34 … So, Tony, let me get this straight. If we want our children to be ‘set up for life’, as you were, we should cast them out onto the streets at an early age, preferably among a bunch of kindly prostitutes who can teach them, amongst other things, the finer details of lovemaking in their early teens.

    We should eschew the notion of education and limit the time our offspring spend in the schoolroom lest they become elitist ideologues whose only purpose in life is to annoy the crap out of ‘real’ people like you.

    We also need to understand that ‘real men’ who use prostitutes are overwhelmingly a wonderful cohort of human beings – they’re respectful and gentlemanly, and the ladies they pay for sex are happy and fulfilled, driving Beemers no less, and priding themselves on the essential service they’re providing.

    Sadly, male prostitution is a tawdry blight on the profession of selling sex, marred as it is by violence and abuse, but ‘those’ men are different, aren’t they? Men who sell sex and men who buy it from them are animals – they do unspeakable shit that men who buy women for sex wouldn’t ever contemplate.

    Am I getting it right so far?

    Is your complete lack of logic and commonsense apparent yet?

  13. Christopher Eastman-Nagle

    December 3, 2017 at 3:14 pm

    ‘Feminazi’?….That is a beauty, Tony.

    You have obviously deeply thought this through and really pinpointed the cruelty being inflicted on boys just wanting to be natural boys, because girls really like being treated like sexual servants and being occasionally roughed up a bit.

    They need that to keep them in line and show them who really is the boss. Nature sometimes is cruel and no one is to blame … except the black uniformed ideologically interferers from the feminist SS …

    These man-eating storm-troopers of the New FemoReich inspire fear and loathing among boy innocents who just want to have fun and satisfaction instead enduring the ideological torture of being held to regime account and forced to confess to sham crimes against women who everyone knows are just asking for it …

    So unjust, Tony. So repressive. You don’t have to put up with this … No guilt … No more TT fake news by these ideological goose steppers. No pasaran!

  14. Tony Stone

    December 3, 2017 at 11:46 am

    #22, Lynne … With life experiences, you take them as they come and cope, until you can be the master of your life, or you don’t survive. You have to see it as a means to improve your life and not a victim of it. This way negatives can become positives and if you survive, take you forward. My time on the streets, set me up for life and what I learned from the people I met and associated with, taught me all about life and how to cope with it.

    The women I met, were in control of their lives, not suppressed or abused, other than by do gooder god nutter women and had the respect of their clients and associates. Of course there were problems and some real morons, but that’s the case in every aspect of life, it’s how we cope and approach them that counts.

    Over the years, did see a few women who were clearly not in a good situation, but those I believed at the time were junkies and drunks. They were frowned upon by others and worked on the streets to get their next hit, not forced to and from my understanding, they got into the business after they became addicted. The ladies I knew, never worked on the streets.

    #31. “Human rights lawyer Julian Burnside made the most succinct comment on the effect of prostitution on men’s thinking:

    Prostitution affects all women because it affects the way men regard women”

    This is the problem we face in all aspects of life, those with no experience or knowledge about real life and clueless as to how everyone lives outside their own elitist circle. All they have is an elitist warped viewpoint of life and nothing else.

    Yet they seem to think having spent their lives in a school room, gives them the experience to know what is best for everyone else, when the sociological outcomes, prove the complete opposite.

    Those that do the best job of helping those working the streets, come from the streets, not an elitist university, those on the streets have paid for.

    Real men regard women as they see them and how they act towards blokes, not for any other reason. Only seriously warped minds create disgusting claims, when the facts are the opposite and we see this with all ideologues.

    You see daily these bent minds creating disgusting interpretations of everyday signs, events and sayings. Whilst the majority see these things for what they are, harmless bits of life.

    (comment challenged and deleted)

    Just about everyone I ever came into contact with throughout my life, that has experience of prostitution, says the vast majority of men really respect the women in the profession.

    That has been my experience as well, even today know a couple in the profession here in Tas and they are well respected and excellent ladies. They are very well off and happy with their lives, what they have achieved and see it as a necessary service.

    Can’t see driving a new BMW, owning a number of business premises, a beautiful home and no debt, as being abused.

    You also fail to address the other side of the equation, male prostitution and how large, violent and abusive it is, compared to female prostitution. Women mainly are protected, but the blokes are not. Which is a true indication of your real agenda and it’s not social cohesion.

  15. Invicta

    December 3, 2017 at 3:41 am

    #23 WillM … Where is this mythical ‘underground’ – this place to which all prostitution retreats if any attempt is made to regulate it? Is it a network of red-lit bunkers under our cities with secret entrances and a ‘knock three times and ask for Joe’ admission protocol?

    I ask this genuinely, because it seems that, regulated or not, or however regulated – criminalised, legalised or decriminalised – prostitution operates in plain sight. In bricks and mortar premises, on the streets, and online.

    Australia, for example, has a number of different state-based legislative approaches to prostitution and I seriously doubt ANY punter has to venture into subterranean territory to pay for a shag.

    And as for the ‘no end of inquiries into “sex work”’ to which you refer, have you read the report of the recent (2015) NSW government inquiry into the regulation of brothels – https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/committees/DBAssets/InquiryReport/ReportAcrobat/5198/Final Report – Inquiry into the Regulation of Brot.pdf

    Whilst it made a point of reiterating the committee’s support for decriminalisation of prostitution, in principal, the report recommended a brothel licensing system to rein in the proliferation of illegal brothels, and the associated trafficking of Asian girls and women into the Australian sex trade.

    And before you counter with the NSW government’s eventual rejection of this recommendation, read the submissions and evidence. The illegal sex trade in NSW has exploded in NSW since prostitution was decriminalised, and women are being trafficked into prostitution in ever-increasing numbers.

    Is that a good thing? Do those workers have ‘currency and self-determination’?

    Do you pay council rates? Would it please you if your rates were paying to fight a losing battle against illegal brothels, as is the case in several NSW local council jurisdictions?

  16. Isla MacGregor

    December 2, 2017 at 8:30 pm

    #24 Yes Betty I would like to know why also.

    If it is the case that Tas Pol are turning a blind eye to sex trade operations in Tasmania then the community need to be getting onto their local member of Parliament and Councillors and asking them to request information from Tasmania Police about what if any investigations they are conducting and where is the public reporting about this?

    If Tasmania is seen as a [i]good[/i] destination for bikie gangs involved in organised crime – the illegal sex trade will be linked.

    Further, why do we continue to accept the advertising of women as commodities to bought by men in The Mercury/Examiner/Advertiser Personal columns -just more exposure of the normalisation of the subordination and sexual abuse of women.

    And why do Editors allow the advertising to include descriptors of women the size of children?

    Professor Bob Pease, now at RMIT, was very opposed to this type of advertising and wanted to see it stopped.

  17. Isla MacGregor

    December 2, 2017 at 8:17 pm

    Human rights lawyer [b]Julian Burnside[/b] made the most succinct comment on the effect of prostitution on men’s thinking:

    [b] Prostitution affects all women because it affects the way men regard women[/b]

  18. Simone

    December 2, 2017 at 7:22 pm

    @WillM The inference that a woman can’t discuss the sex-trade and pornography if she hasn’t been in it her self is a spurious one. The sex-trade impacts on all women and as such women have a right to discuss, write and agitate about it! If I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard this argument I would never have had to enter the sex-trade myself.

    You may not agree with the author but you are referring to pimp funded and media- biased research and talking about the Scarlet Alliance as representative of the majority in the sex-trade.

    You try and separate actors such as Soros as if he doesn’t have global reach, which is utterly bizarre.

    You talk about knowing someone who was in the sex-trade and has not been harmed by it, as if that person is representative of the majority, yet when sex-trade survivors and currently prostituted women share our stories we are dismissed as speaking ‘personally’ and told ‘that is only anecdotal so doesn’t pass as empirical evidence’.

    The reason decriminalisation of pimps, sex-buyers and other third party profiteers doesn’t work is because it expands the market, expands trafficking, expands the idea of women as sexual commodities, and purely on an economic level, drives prices down. This has a huge impact on prostituted women. Women are paid approximately two thirds less than we used to be when I was in prostitution (I was in both legal and illegal).

    I was raking in the money and like most women in prostitution that money never translated to financial security or long term independence.

    Also, there is no impetus for exit programs and the majority of the prostituted want to get out.

    PTSD is rife in the sex-trade and considering that the younger one starts in the sex-trade the greater the long term health consequences, plus the fact that one is worn out from sexually use and abuse- one is also left without job skills transferable to real work opportunities and co-morbid health conditions which can impact on cognitive function, tolerance for being able to be in working environments with men and so on.

    There is significant research and data on the fact that the sex-trade can not be brought up to health codes in any situation. The only way to tackle this abuse in a class of persons is to de-stigmatise the prostituted person and understand this on the basis of sex-class based oppression, offer exit programs should she choose to accept them, criminalise sexual access purchase, pimping and third party profiteering.

    The women you see on Twitter are advertising, which is exactly what I would do when trying to make money when I was in the sex-trade- so rather than call the author “rambling and incoherent” I suggest you recognise that life is a little more complex than building blocks in kindergarten, and that we can cope with that.

    It is not complicated but it *is* complex, and as adults we should be able to deal with that. Increased demand means a demand for supply. A couple, or even hundreds, of people saying they’re “happy hookers” or “It’s not great but it’s just another job” does not mitigate the reality for the majority in the sex-trade.

  19. Isla MacGregor

    December 2, 2017 at 7:12 pm

    Julie Bindel in the The Guardian 16 October 2016 explains the failure of decrim:

    [i]When New Zealand introduced decriminalisation, there existed a mountain of evidence from the Netherlands that legalisation had failed. The sex workers’ rights lobbyists stopped promoting the “Dutch model” and turned to New Zealand. There is a fine line between legalisation and decriminalisation.

    Legalisation of prostitution means that the state requires registration of women in brothels, compulsory health monitoring, and taxation. Decriminalisation is the removal of penalties for soliciting, pimping and brothel keeping. Pimps still exist, but become business managers, and brothels are rebranded as regular business.

    Sabrinna Valisce, a keynote speaker at Shifting the Burden, was in prostitution in New Zealand before and after it was decriminalised.

    [b]Valisce was an on-off volunteer for the New Zealand Prostitute Collective (NZPC) for 25 years and supported decriminalisation because she believed it would offer protection against abusive and exploitative brothel owners. But the opposite happened, according to Valisce, who is now a supporter of the Nordic model.[/b]

    A New Zealand government-funded report from 2007 found that post-decriminalisation, brothel managers often pressure workers to provide “extra services” without condoms, but “penetrative vaginal and anal sex safe practices are strongly adhered to”.

    Since the change in the law, brothel owners, not the women, set prices for services, and customers demand kissing and unsafe practices, because they had become emboldened, according to Valisce. Decriminalisation also led to an increase in people working in the sex trade, due to increased demand, and also to the emergence of the image of prostitution as empowering and glamorous through TV shows like Secret Diary of a Call Girl. When criminal sanctions are removed from sex establishments, it becomes the responsibility of health officials to carry out inspections. I have access to data on New Zealand obtained via the Official Information Act which shows that, aside from 12 that were conducted in 2003 in the first few weeks of the new legislation, only 11 inspections occurred across the whole of New Zealand until January 2015.
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    Police powers have been reduced under decriminalisation. Police are now forbidden to enter brothels if they receive intelligence that underage girls or trafficked women are being held, as they could be accused of harassment by brothel owners.

    On the streets of Auckland during a recent research trip, I met a women sitting next to her Zimmer frame. It turned out she was in her early 50s, and said she was disabled because of a life in prostitution. I asked if her situation had improved since decriminalisation, and she told me “no”, because in her experience, the men who buy her feel entitled to do exactly what they want, in the same way they would if purchasing a hamburger. “The only thing that would help me is a way out”, she said.

    Legitimising the sex trade by removing all criminal penalties for pimps, brothel owners and sex buyers helps no one but the exploiters.[/i]

  20. Joanna

    December 2, 2017 at 6:21 pm

    #25

    Thank you for your comment. I couldn’t agree more. Very well expressed.

  21. Joanna

    December 2, 2017 at 6:14 pm

    #23.
    First, please give me an example where Scarlet Allience is doing exit programs.
    With a great need Project Respect and Pink Fundation started in VIC to offer much needed support that Scarlet Allience didn’t offer.

    Most people don’t annalyse prostitution in a context of patriarchal conditioning of men and women, so if you accept and desire to perpetuate the same conditioning and abuse and you don’t see anything wrong with porn or prostitution, you will never see it as part of a system and only as personal choice.
    There is really no point us arguing if you don’t understand this.

    Im not sure if you know much about neurology and psychology, but it has been proven that people can get addicted to abusive practices, people can do and recieve harm while the brain releases oxytocin, creating bonding of abused to abusers for example. Quite a few people who exited porn speak about it after they leave.This is how grooming works and is part of violence.

    The violence in prostititution is in the existing power imbalance in which girls grow up having to consider selling their bodies but men grow up with access to women’s bodies.

    The programs in Sweden included help for men who were buyers who wanted to stop purchasing sex or needed help with sex or porn addiction, who needed counseling about their own inabilities to feel and connect.Consuming porn and buying women’s bodies is not “healing”as Rachel Wooton says, it’s perpetuating patriarchal conditioning of men’s entitlement. Is there a sexual service for disabled women out there? No, why not? No one wants to hold her or obligingly perform oral sex on her to make her orgasm? Women dont demand this culturaly, don’t they?
    Rachel is protecting a myth and protecting patriarchal status quo and her place in it as a woman who makes a iving from it.

    Survivours of prostitution are women who understand that women are coerced into contributing to their own exploitation.
    They have been there and now they speak out and we listen to them.

  22. WillM

    December 2, 2017 at 6:00 pm

    #25 “What I like about the Nordic model is the way it attacks the problem by attacking the customer perpetrators and their ‘industry’ facilitators, while providing escape channels for women.”

    A failed model that only serves to marginalise and further oppress the sex workers!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ae6T6pTf_AM

  23. Christopher Eastman-Nagle

    December 2, 2017 at 5:16 pm

    The nub of this article is that it pin points the conflated nature of the divide between a marketed-consumer-porno version of ‘libertation’ and a feminist one of getting out from under male domination.

    At another level, it pinpoints the identical deregulatory agenda of commercial and social libertarians. Amnesty and the brothel ‘industry’ share an identical ideology that actually facilitates a take down of the status of women and reduces them to a product category/object/thing to be used and exploited as a sexual servant-on-demand. And it almost invariably zeroes down into the most status damaging domination/subservience archetypes that are often accompanied by force, pain and injury.

    The effects of that ideology spill seamlessly across from sexual commerce to dating to the way women are viewed in all sectors of the economy and life generally.

    Liberation for women has come to mean an open season on them, which they have to go along with, not only because if they don’t comply, one of their sisters will, but because they are now supposed to ‘like it’, just like men do.

    What I like about the Nordic model is the way it attacks the problem by attacking the customer perpetrators and their ‘industry’ facilitators, while providing escape channels for women.

    Nothing will ever completely get rid of the sex industry and sexual pressure on women generally, but by legislating our disapproval in ways that hit the main beneficiaries of this pathological industry and the crummy attitudes and behaviors that it preys on, we force it and them back into the repressed cracks and crevices of our nature, where they belong.

    Libertarians for a long time have managed to delegitimise ‘repression’ and any other discipline of character, or behavioral/attitudinal boundary. They have claimed that if it felt good it was good, but that was always a lie.

    There is plenty of nasty stuff in all of us that we can only indulge at great cost to ourselves and others. There are bits of ourselves that need keeping under lock and key and it is about time we started to re-acknowledge that not just as a personal and private objective, but as a public one that is reflected in social practice and the law.

    Privatised and deregulated libertarianism has done a lot of damage to our social infrastructure and it is time we did something about it.

    And the brothel industry is a good start.

  24. Betty

    December 2, 2017 at 4:20 pm

    I would like to know why the former MP (and Mayor of GCC) Mr Terry Martin took all the rap for all the (alleged) involvement of other MPs and a certain Senator and also several senior Police Officers (alleged) and some from the judiciary (alleged).

  25. WillM

    December 2, 2017 at 3:27 pm

    #21 ….. nothing in what you cite explains why the explains why the term “sex worker” has been rejected. In Australia it is the accepted term among workers.

    Citing international examples especially in poorer countries and communities has no context to the Australian experience. The fact is there have been no end of inquiries into sex work in Australia. Overwhelmingly they have all come out in favour of a decriminalised model. None of the countries which have implemented criminalising the purchase of sex have been able to stop the sale of sex, which continues underground and therefore causes more harm to sex workers. Decriminalisation works, gives the workers currency and self determination and control. In an advanced society and democracy this is the progressive way to approach such matters. (which btw we should also be doing for drugs)

  26. Lynne Newington

    December 2, 2017 at 3:01 pm

    Tony @20. My hope is this finds you in a good place at this time of your life without going into it any further.

  27. Isla MacGregor

    December 2, 2017 at 2:43 pm

    In an article in Vogue [b]Why activist Ruchira Gupta refuses to use the term ‘sex worker’- October 2017 – [/b]- Ruchira Gupta puts the sex trade into global perspective and explains why the term “sex worker” has been rejected:

    [i][b]When Ruchira Gupta won an Emmy for her documentary, The Selling Of Innocents, in 1997, she didn’t indulge in the armchair outrage that the topic of her film—the sex trafficking that existed between Nepal and India—would have inspired in most. Instead, she came back to Kamathipura, Mumbai’s red-light district where she shot her film, and asked the women one question: What can we do to help?

    The answer became the basis for setting up her NGO, Apne Aap Women Worldwide, in 2002. “They had four dreams. They told me they wanted a school for their children. Secondly, they said they wanted a room of their own. The third thing they wanted was justice. And they said they wanted somebody to watch out for them.”

    Working towards ending inter-generational prostitution, with efforts concentrated on Sonagachi in Kolkata, Najafgarh on the outskirts of Delhi and Forbesganj on the Indo-Nepal border, her organisation has affected the lives of more than 20,000 women across the country.

    A MATTER OF POLICY
    A former journalist who worked with the Telegraph and BBC, Gupta has been working on affecting policy change on trafficking and prostitution for over 25 years now and is a global authority on the subject. Working with the UN for more than a decade before she set up Apne Aap, she has also testified in the United States Senate before the passage of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act in 2000, besides designing and teaching the first-ever course on human trafficking at New York University’s School of Global Affairs.

    With Apne Aap Women Worldwide, what started as a struggle to get the children of the prostituted women into school (“We found that education was the pivot in turning things around”) has now become a larger movement.

    “We have helped more than 21,000 women, girls and their family members gain government ID cards, voter ID cards and BPL cards, through which now they not only have a political voice but they’re also linked to the government’s anti-poverty programmes, food, low-cost housing and low-cost healthcare, and with all this they can also create their exit system because their vulnerability is coming down as their dependence on the brothel system is coming down,” says Gupta, who now divides her time between New York and India…..[/i][/b]

  28. Tony Stone

    December 2, 2017 at 2:27 pm

    Threads like this always interest me, having had a unique experience with prostitution over a few years as a young kid.

    Spent from age 8-14 living on the streets of a major Aus city, during that time, spent a great deal of time in the company and protection of a number of prostitutes and their minders.

    There were the unhappy ones, but the majority were very happy and most led double lives. They worked during the day, when their husbands and kids were away and then lived a normal life at night.

    The unattached worked at nights mostly, although knew one lady who was really good to me and ended up teaching me how to please a lady and she had a travelling salesman for a husband, so she worked whenever he was not around.

    Only discovered the girls led double lives, when trying to look inconspicuous around a group of school kids after school. School inspectors were on the prowl and it was safer to hang round in a group as mates.

    Walked smack bang into a lady knew from a house I frequented and she nearly dropped dead when she saw me talking to her sons. Twigged as soon as she asked them to introduce me to her, so acted like never knew her.

    When she saw me again, gave me a 5 pound note and thanked me for being cool. She ended up as being my teacher in sensual life and how to treat a real lady, something she never got at home and it was that way for many I feel.

    Saw some pretty bad things happen, mainly drunk bums, trying to get freebies from the girls, or refusing to pay. In all that time, frequenting those places as had nowhere else to go, it was rare to see any of the girls anything else but pretty happy with their lives. Especially if they had a good security system and the ones I hung out with, had some really heavy, but kind blokes looking after them.

    Prostitution, is something which is a part of all life. Animals of all descriptions, sell their bodies or self, for gain and it will never change.

    The only way to cope with it, is to make sure those involved are protected and not subject to harassment from anyone.

    Of course, in other countries and within Aus, there are those that get abused and forced into prostitution. Which has to be wiped out and can be done.

    (edited … the writer is reminded of the Code of Conduct: http://oldtt.pixelkey.biz/index.php/pages/legalbits )

  29. WillM

    December 2, 2017 at 2:24 pm

    #18 and #15 … “Who speaks on behalf of sex worker front groups and who funds them? Multi billionaires like George Soros who has no interest in justice and equality for women or ending male privilege funds them – that’s who.”

    Scarlet Alliance is a sex worker collective that receives some Government funding and has a membership of sex workers or ex-sex workers only Far better placed to represent sex workers in Australia than any other group. Your tenuous link to Soros is irrevelant in an Australian context. Besides your quoting Coalition Against Trafficking in Women explains nothing other than they have their own barrow to push exactly the same as this article pushes. It would be relevant if there was a sex worker voice.

  30. Isla MacGregor

    December 2, 2017 at 1:14 pm

    #15 … Who speaks on behalf of sex worker front groups and who funds them? Multi billionaires like George Soros who has no interest in justice and equality for women or ending male privilege funds them – that’s who.

    The following article and letter letter from the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women explains:

    [i]On Oct. 17, The New York Times published “George Soros Transfers Billions to Open Society Foundations.” The article neglected to highlight OSF’s position on full decriminalization of the sex trade. In response, our executive director wrote a letter to the editor that remains unpublished by the newspaper. The full text of the letter follows below.

    [b]Dear Editor:
    While George Soros claims to combat “dark forces,” (“George Soros Transfers Billions to Open Society Foundations,” Oct. 17, 2017), his footprint promoting commercial sexual exploitation, including prostitution, is transparent. From Amnesty International to Black Lives Matter, from Colombia to South Africa, Soros heavily funds groups advocating for the decriminalization of the sex trade, including pimping and brothel-owning. Conversely, women’s rights organizations and survivors are pushing to pass laws worldwide that solely decriminalize prostituted individuals and provide them services. It is illogical for Soros to contend that governments can protect the exploited by decriminalizing their exploiters. Vibrant democracies rest on governments’ political will to uphold all individuals’ dignity and equality. Soros should understand that buying sexual access to women’s bodies is an unfettered exercise of violent power and control exercised by those who have choices over those who have few or none. If Soros succeeds in efforts to shield the multi-billion dollar sex industry, fueled by sex traffickers and sex buyers, generations of the most disenfranchised — overwhelmingly women of color — won’t stand a chance at enjoying their human rights or the promise of democracy.

    Taina Bien-Aimé
    Executive Director,
    Coalition Against Trafficking in Women[/i][/b]

  31. WillM

    December 2, 2017 at 12:52 pm

    #16 … “The women who exit prostitution without violence done to them don’t exist” … Really. I have a friend who ‘exited’ and this is not her experience ! I am sure we can find examples to support either side of the argument.

    “like Scarlet Alliance, who are an industry front group” No they are not a front group, they are a sex workers collective! Membership is sex workers or ex sex workers only! They are a representative group, a union if you like. Formed by sex workers for sex workers

    “They aren’t going to … fund exit or counselling programs.” Really, you know this as fact? Not true! This is one of their core operations.

    “Sweden was aiming high, not only at reducing violence to women but restoring historical injustice and inequality between men and women.” Have a look at what people like Rachel Wooton have to say on this. Rachel, I suggest, is much better informed on sex work than you’ll ever be!

  32. Joanna

    December 2, 2017 at 12:00 pm

    #WillM … The main reason why people like me, who haven’t been in prostitution, do this work is to support women who have exited but aren’t supported by our health system and who are ignored or vilified by sex trade lobby groups such as Scarlet Alliance.

    I would have never understood this if I wasn’t informed by women who exited themselves.

    There is a huge amount of research from all over the world on the addictive nature of porn, harms done to those in the industry and does who consume it. Because it is also a billion dollar industry, the propaganda is strong to maintain its image as always fully consensual (no mention of grooming) and not harmful.

    One cannot look at sexual violence and not look at pornography and prostitution.

    The women who exit prostitution without violence done to them don’t exist. We need to know more about both the sexual and psychological harm. The degrees vary, some women can deal with it better as you said. Some women will emphasise independence and other benefits over harm, but it does not mean they don’t exist.

    This is not addressed by groups like Scarlet Alliance, who are an industry front group. They aren’t going to report rape or violence or fund exit or counselling programs. Their interest is to paint prostitution as harmless and positive and they do a great job at it. They also protect their government funding. They won’t reveal the truth about prostitution, the truth that prostitution relies on cultural grooming steeped in women’s historical submission and that it always involves “work” with a threat of male violence (even brothel induction books mention it).

    More often than not while women are in prostitution or porn they won’t speak about it, other than in favor. Mostly they worry about social stigma – not they own harm. I only know a few women who are in the trade or go back and can speak about its harms while still in it. This is rare and puts them in further danger.

    Do the Asian women sold in Launceston and Hobart hotels have glossy internet pages or Twitter/Instagram pages? Is there a Scarlet Alliance outreach arm that can check on these women and how they are treated (tip they may need interpretor)? No? More likely no one gives a shit, the only comment I get is that they undercut the local women.

    My focus is to talk more about male violence and cultural acceptance of male demand.

    Sweden was aiming high, not only at reducing violence to women but restoring historical injustice and inequality between men and women.

  33. WillM

    December 2, 2017 at 10:23 am

    I really don’t know where to start with this article. Perhaps the title?

    Why do we need the porn and pimp inquiry? There is no evidence presented that suggests an issue or connections other than the author;s assertions. The article is a rambling of incoherent sentences that show the author has little if any knowledge of the industry. Has she talked to any sex workers? Has she engaged with the sex workers collective, Scarlet Alliance? I suspect not. Where is the evidence of brothels in Tasmania?

    I’d suggest that any women working in groups are doing it within the letter of the law. You present no evidence otherwise. So what do we have? Someone pushing a model of regulation that the sex workers themselves don’t want. Someone making assertions that somehow sex work is degrading for all, the sex workers are coerced into it and so on.

    If you want to enlighten yourself go follow the many workers on Twitter. You will find many happy women who love their profession and abhor the nordic model campaigners! Sure let’s campaign against violence against women, trafficking and coercion but for the vast majority of sex workers this doesn’t apply, and what the workers want is a model of decriminalisation.

    To the author I say go out and meet with sex workers and representative bodies before you continue your campaign wagon. You might find that sex workers are self determining agents in charge of their own sex labour rather than victims! One of the often articulated complaints about where the nordic model has been introduced, primarily Sweden, is that there has been no consultation with those affected, sex workers, during any legislative reform discussion, reports or research! And finally what evidence do you have that allows you to conflate violence with sex work?

  34. Isla MacGregor

    December 1, 2017 at 11:41 pm

    Prof Bob Pease’ (Research Policy Advisor with White Ribbon Campaign) had this to say in his opinion piece in The Mercury:

    [i]Privilege leads men to expect deferential treatment, unpaid domestic labour, child care, sexual services and emotional support. While men have to relinquish privileges, there is much to be gained for men through gender equality.[/i]

    More: http://www.themercury.com.au/news/opinion/talking-point-is-the-message-getting-through-to-aussie-men/news-story/43ec139406686e10a62abe7279c55070

  35. Philipt Lowe

    December 1, 2017 at 10:11 pm

    does it make a difference when a man fathers daughters?I know that some men do terrible things to their children,but is there any change when a man raises and loves a child?If a man can change,then let’s have look at the circumstance.That poor girl who was prostituted in Hobart at the Mercure hotel.
    wasn’t she abused by some customers who were policemen?
    exactly who are the users and abusers,and why do they do this.What has happened in their life that causes this behaviour.
    Is chemical castration an effective treatment,or in some cases would surgical castration be justifiable to both sex addict and society?I have pondered these things often.Pornography is mind poisoning filth.It does great harm to all societies in Australia and around the world.What some people will do to Aquire money is nasty and horrible,and then do they go home to fathers to their own children?

  36. Andrea

    December 1, 2017 at 4:42 pm

    This lack of concern about brothel keeping, demand and exit programs is echoed in Western Australia. A new push for decriminalisation has prompted a very biased study from Curtin University which claims, as appears to be happening in Tasmania, that simply decriminalising it all will make everything alright. I am glad Dean and Armitage are at least open to learning more about the Nordic Model.

  37. Joanna

    December 1, 2017 at 3:11 pm

    Mathew Munro, I’m a TAFE teacher and would like to keep education affordable, better yet – free.The business model for education is ruining higher education. Also some industry investments are highly questionable. I recently read about arms manufacturers Lockheed Martin sponsoring RMIT and their new research lab.

    You seem to understand the male buyer motives better than I. I would love to see more investigative journalism on male violence, pornography and purchasing sex from male perspective. Keen to interview men and write an article?

  38. Lynne Newington

    December 1, 2017 at 2:40 pm

    #7 … “Sexism, sexual callousness, lack of empathy, sexual coerciveness and unequal relationships influence men’s desire for paid sex”—There’s a hell of a lot more than that influencing demand for paid sex”.

    That’s an interesting perspective, clergy only have to offer prayers and special blessings hoping the woman will keep her mouth shut.

  39. Mathew Munro

    December 1, 2017 at 2:12 pm

    “Universities need to be free” — No they bloody well don’t !!! We have so many damned university graduates these days that the majority of graduates from humanities and social sciences and a large proportion of graduates from other degrees end up either unemployed or working in menial labour.

    No up-front university course fees or administration fees, loans for text-books and student allowances are justifiable, but we should be making those lucky enough to end up in a high paying job pay back the costs of their education, and we should raise university entrance scores, and we should kick people out of uni if they’re not passing, and we should encourage / advertise / promote other career pathways.

  40. Mathew Munro

    December 1, 2017 at 2:06 pm

    “Tasmanian girls and women should never have to consider prostitution as an option to sustain themselves economically” — That, I certainly agree with. If you’re forced to do something economically, it is practically the same as if someone holds a gun to your head and forces you to do it.

  41. Mathew Munro

    December 1, 2017 at 1:58 pm

    “Sexism, sexual callousness, lack of empathy, sexual coerciveness and unequal relationships influence men’s desire for paid sex” — There’s a hell of a lot more than that influencing demand for paid sex. Those things would barely come into it. The main factors would be the price of sex, the cost of living, men’s unemployment rates and men’s wages which would determine if they’re able to afford to pay for sex. Secondary to that would be the difficulty of getting sex without paying for it, which has been made a lot harder recently with the rise of feminism.

  42. Mathew Munro

    December 1, 2017 at 1:47 pm

    “how many violent men watch porn” — Probably the same proportion as non-violent men – very nearly 100%!

  43. Mathew Munro

    December 1, 2017 at 1:44 pm

    These are not excuses for sexual violence, they simply are facts of life: “some men are just violent”, “[some (very few)] women have rape fantasies”, “and [some] men… can’t control their urges”.

  44. Lynne Newington

    December 1, 2017 at 12:41 pm

    “As a first step, we need a parliamentary inquiry in order to understand fully the negative impacts of pornography within our community. We are compelled to ask: how many violent men watch porn, how many children and teens are exposed to porn, how many copy these violent acts, how addictive is pornography, how does it affect”.

    One aspect I believe is what’s acceptable within the home and what books on the coffee table.
    Television is another, so one doesn’t have to go too far from the front door for explanations.

  45. Isla MacGregor

    December 1, 2017 at 12:23 pm

    If Tasmania Police are refusing to take action on illegal brothels it begs the question – what if any investigations the Australian Federal Police are undertaking into the trafficking of women through illegal brothels in Tasmania? One also needs to ask whether any children are being prostituted in these brothels? Some serious questions to be answered by Police Commissioner Darryn Hine.

    After Iceland introduced their asymmetric decriminalisation laws, it took considerable protest from women’s groups to push police to enforce the law. But cultural change has taken place within their police force and notably across their society.

  46. Joanna

    December 1, 2017 at 11:48 am

    It is truly appalling that many women in health care don’t see prostitution as harmful and they don’t see women in prostitution as most needing specialist health care. We are continuously failing to protect the most vulnerable women due to those beliefs. We are failing women in the future because we as a society believe that prostitution is about women’s free choice, not about male access, male demand and masculinity.

  47. Isla MacGregor

    December 1, 2017 at 11:10 am

    I am astonished at what you write Jo, that [i][b]Women’s Health Tasmania has failed to take any initiatives in support of exit programs in Tasmania. This is indicative of their flawed belief that the sex trade is fully and always consensual and has no impact and harms no one. How an organisation such as Women’s Health Tasmania can be funded by Government beggars belief.[/b][/i]

    It would seem that Dean and Armiatge’s views are typical of the those who [i][b]don’t want to know[/b][/i] to the point of wanting to stay ill informed of the realities. Further – not as a capitulation to men’s privilege but in support of it.

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