Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Economy

‘5000 Tasmanian households go without meals each year …’

Energy costs are one of the most significant strains on a household budget.

Many Tasmanians live with high levels of financial stress day to day and struggle to afford the most essential of items that many of us take for granted. In all family budgets there are some costs that are unavoidable and energy is obviously one of them.

We welcome the openness of the Hodgman Government and Minister Barnett to listen and respond to the community needs.

“TasCOSS raised the inequity of the original decision and argued strongly for the benefit to be shared across all Tasmanians households relying on income support payments. We applaud the Government for their responsiveness to the needs of our fellow Tasmanians. Tasmanians want to see a Government who listens, and then responds quickly where it can. $125 for a low income household can be the difference between being able to put healthy food on the table or being able to afford an essential item for the kids for school “ Ms Goodes said.

Recent data released by ABS shows that financial stress is a reality for many Tasmanian households. This includes over 21,500 (10.2%) Tasmanian households reporting to the ABS they could not pay and electricity, phone or gas bill on time in the past 12 months (2015-16 ABS Household Expenditure Survey).

Download briefing documents for further information:

Statistics_on_low_income_Tas.pdf

TasCOSS_APW_2017_snapshot_FINAL_121017_(002).pdf

Guy Barnett: Special Energy Bonus extended

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14 Comments

14 Comments

  1. Russell

    December 6, 2017 at 7:49 pm

    Re #12
    Most likely the cash would have gone towards alcohol or drugs, so that’s why I ask them what it’s for and then offer buy it for them, because there is no way I am going to waste money on their addiction.

  2. r

    November 27, 2017 at 5:49 pm

    The news that NSW is going to spend $2 billion on replacing a couple of perfectly good sports stadiums is just so ridiculous when we have so many problems that we cannot afford to solve, struck me as a pointer to Australia as having finally flipped.

    I wonder if some of the homeless and those who cannot afford to eat and have access to power, feel about that.

    Also the people who have been on a hospital waiting list for years, or have had to be treated in an ambulance outside the hospital due to a lack of beds, are probably jumping for joy that they would have been able to visit a new state of the art venue, had they the money.

    Come on people – when is this nonsense going to stop?

    Remember that Rome eventually fell because the people had spent all their money on their lifestyles and could not afford to repel the invaders.

    Oh sorry, we will not be invaded by China, they have already bought us.

  3. Ted Mead

    November 27, 2017 at 5:10 pm

    In my experience of travelling extensively around the world, the only place where the offer of food was rejected was in Australia.

    There may have been a good reason why they wanted cash only, but I never had it explained to me when I questioned it.

    I could be biased, and I often don’t give to beggars on advice from locals although they do have at least my empathy.

    An egalitarian world for all seems further from reality as years pass on.

    What happened to the statement that Bob Hawke declared in 1987 – “By 1990, no Australian child will be living in poverty”?

  4. Russell

    November 21, 2017 at 2:47 pm

    Re #10
    That’s fair enough Philip. If anyone is begging money from me I always ask what it’s for, and if it’s for food I offer to buy it for them.

  5. Philip Lowe

    November 20, 2017 at 9:17 pm

    I once offered an ice cream to a lass who was begging..She declined. She said,’it spoils my image and I just want money’.
    I gave her my scarf instead..No money.

  6. Russell

    November 20, 2017 at 10:25 am

    Coles, Woolworths and many large fruit & vegie shops throw so much edible food out everyday, and there are so many empty farm houses throughout country Tasmania.

    Why?

  7. john hayward

    November 18, 2017 at 8:32 pm

    The Tas Govt is doing its best to reduce stress, which often stems from citizens’ awareness of how poorly we fare in comparison with other states. This they reportedly do by misappropriating federal top-up education grants to the states.

    And you thought fox task forces were their only idea.

    John Hayward

  8. Kim Peart

    November 18, 2017 at 9:40 am

    As I describe in Comment #2, this is a created human-trap, which requires unemployment, poverty and homelessness so growth can deliver a larger share of the national pie to some, and an absolute killing to a few.

    This can only be turned around through moral outrage and compassionate action which demands and delivers real work with real pay to all able citizens.

    After my business failed in Tasmania in 2006 I found myself homeless on the streets in Byron Bay and Brisbane, though working full-time, living out of self-storage and sleeping in my car on the street as I paid off the debts.

    I have met other homeless people.

    I have worked with the homeless in Caboolture.

    I agree with the Finish solution to homelessness. ~ Build a home.

    The same can be said for unemployment. ~ Provide work.

    A Universal Basic Income would remove the mean cruelty involved in the Centrelink system, so I favour that.

    To deliver hope globally, and step to the next phase in our evolution with peace and prosperity, we need to expand into space.

    Space expansion has been delayed since the 1970s, when it first became possible, and that delay is a direct cause of all our strife one Earth.

    Only a space based economy will lift all children on Earth out of poverty.

    Moving on from poverty will diminish the need to have children, as if we care to look we will see that most children are born to poor families.

    But then again, in the space environment, which will include Earth, there will be space to have more children, who will be empowered in their life choices.

    In space there is no limit to expansion, and no limit to empowerment.

    This is the political choice we have now, if we will fight for it.

    I look to a time when I will be able to go to a homeless person, and offer them a home, and if they are able, access to real work with real pay.

    If we all want that, then its a question of how we deliver it, locally and globally.

  9. Philip Lowe

    November 18, 2017 at 5:50 am

    Kim Peart.Get out onto the streets mate and do some in depth interviews with those people begging on the streets.Let’s hear the stories of how it came to this.People live on this planet as do maggots on a dead horse.The planet is full to bursting point with Homo sapiens.The only country that has ever done anything positive about the problems of overpopulation is China..Have you observed the numbers game race between the Catholic Church and Islam.If I was crude I would call it a massive shagging competition.How many children are born unwanted in the world?,all for the sake of sexual gratification. mostly on the part of the man.Come on Kim,let’s be having you.

  10. Kim Peart

    November 17, 2017 at 11:56 pm

    Re: 3 ~ Revolution! ~ or Evolution?

    When I examine the human situation in the Earth’s ecology, I see an increasingly unsustainable state marching into an evolutionary dead-end.

    I see no way out of this extinction event with a total focus on Earth alone.

    David Wallace-Wells’ article, An Uninhabitable Earth, brought out the detail that climate scientists are wondering about the Great Filter Theory, to explain the eerie silence from the stars, which suggests an event in a planet civilization on the cusp of expansion among the stars, that takes them out.

    I go deeper into this problem in my recent TT article, Vision Drum ~
    http://oldtt.pixelkey.biz/index.php/article/vision-drum

    Our simple choice is to mobilise globally as citizens for serious space development, so we can secure a sustainable presence beyond Earth, where access to the virtually infinite power of the Sun will allow us to deal with all problems on Earth, and send poverty into history, globally.

    Expansion into space became possible in the 1970s, but the fossil fuel and arms industry propaganda kept the whole world focused totally on the Earth.

    That con is now becoming our death knell.

    We may have left our run too late, but in terms of Evolution, we need to try.

    When I looked at what would happen with space, I could see that everything would change for us on Earth.

    Space demands peace to deliver security.

    We have the technology now to mobilise globally to win space for peace.

    Will we continue marching into extinction, or wake up to the need for evolutionary expansion beyond our planet death-trap?

    In space I see the next phase in our Evolution happening, beginning with peace, growing with compassion, and revealing itself with creativity.

    Evolution is the next Revolution, from old ways of war on Earth, to new ways of peace in space.

  11. Philip Lowe

    November 17, 2017 at 10:40 pm

    Oh no,not in Hobart!There are many thousands of these beggars on the streets of the towns and cities in the UK.Is it easy money,easier than working a shovel and a brush?Does it suit a social life where the group or gang mentality is satisfied?
    Addictions play their part,and that includes drugs,alcohol,cigs AND gambling.I can hardly believe that this is now a feature of Australian towns and cities.Is it just a way for some lazy people to plead poverty and beg?How often do you see anybody begging for work?Is the benefits system in Australia so cockeyed as to encourage this kind of thing?Many questions,who are the accountable people?Perhaps TT contributors could interview some of these street people and publish the stories …

  12. O'Brien

    November 17, 2017 at 6:45 pm

    It’s all theft… although the profiteers would call it ‘sound business’…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShDXQ5G_8Tc

  13. Kim Peart

    November 17, 2017 at 3:18 pm

    Currently growth is driven by quietly maintaining around 5 % unemployment as a way to drive growth so some can get a larger share of the national pie, and many can eat poverty ~
    ‘How the unemployed ‘disappear’ and why it matters’
    Rose-Marie Stampe & David Fryer, The Conversation, 12 January 2015
    https://theconversation.com/how-the-unemployed-disappear-and-why-it-matters-35850

    This is why we have under-employment, unemployment, poverty and homelessness.

    It is a formalised system of abuse which traps many children in poverty and delivers some older women into homelessness.

    We can know that we are morally bankrupt as a nation when we allow thousands of ex-service personnel to be homeless.

    Having researched and written a number of TT articles on this matter, I find that the best working solution is to shift political and economic gears to a government employment guarantee which would provide work for all citizens at the minimum wage level.

    Elon Musk and many others are also in favour of a Universal Basic Income, tax free, with no questions asked.

    Those two measures together would solve homelessness, end poverty, create real full employment and ensure that all workers receive a fair wage.

    Private enterprise would have to pay more than the minimum wage to attract workers.

    Slave-like conditions would no longer be possible, and expectations of unpaid overtime would be history.

    If anyone working in the poverty industry has a vested interest in maintaining poverty and homelessness, then that would be a problem, and it’s one of the many ways the current abusive system is maintained as the status quo.

    Anyone wishing to crack the whip of responsibility and work toward a fair society may contact me ~ kimpeart@iinet.net.au

    I have made this offer many times across our society, and even organised a conference on unemployment around 1996 as part of Human Rights Week, but no takers yet.

    As a nation, we signed up for the basic human right to work with fair pay in 1948.

    See article 23 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    Is it time to act yet?

  14. Stephen Menadue

    November 17, 2017 at 2:56 pm

    Another aspect of not being able to do a ‘good’ shop is that a lot of the elemental products (cleaning, personal hygiene etc) can so often add up to half or more of the total – especially when first moving into a place.

    Community based food redistribution centres like Second Bite and Foodbank etc come into their own by ensuring that what was intended for waste (despite being viable) gets back into the cupboards of those needy people – they shine by ensuring the charity organisations can relieve some of the need.

    Let’s not forget that in a number of cases, addictions of one sort or another are helping create the high numbers of needy. This is the point at which the State becomes responsible for the application of relevant, well designed programs to help those in addiction get a hand UP to get OUT of that addiction. Yes, they did choose to partake in their addiction(s) but that doesn’t relieve us of being our brother’s keeper and trying to help those among us who need a lift to function responsibly and happily as a ‘functioning’ member of a community.

    Yes, the one with the problem that causes this need for basics to be supplied elsewhere needs to put their hand up for help and yes, this can ONLY happen when they reach a point of exasperation while being under the grip of whatever it is that they do too much of.

    Again, this is the point where the State must already have help in place. Even if the State’s only contribution is the money and not the ideas, funding NGOs etc to run the programs is just as good as shouldering the responsibility solely.

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