Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Economy

FEDERAL Election 2016: Good Heavens …

*Pic: Ross’ pic of an Andrew Nikolic poster …

‘Politics is the art of the possible. Politics is how we decide who gets what. Politics influences how much you pay for interest on student loans and how easy or difficult it is to get financial aid. Politics is the process by which we govern ourselves. Politics is life, and all life is politics. Human beings, as essentially social animals, can never escape this.’ (T.M.Sell, Politics and Power).

Swept from power. No longer kingmakers …

Far-right Tasmanian Liberals, The Three Amigos Andrew Nikolic, Brett Whiteley, and Eric Hutchinson ( ABC: Election 2016; Labor Party claims three marginal Tasmanian seats ) were obliterated in a Labor landslide which has left the nation uncertain as to who will govern ( Mercury: 2016 Federal Election: Rolling coverage of the campaign, Day 55 ), ( Advocate: Federal Election 2016: Live coverage, polls & results ) …

As As the Guardian’s Political Editor Lenore Taylor says: Even if Turnbull wins, he loses. And even if Shorten loses, he wins . Messiah Malcolm must be looking nervously over his shoulder after predecessor PM Tony Abbott so comprehensively swept to victory in Warringah ( ABC HERE ).

Good heavens … what a night …

A Total Mess … What Dr Kevin Bonham says … This post follows the post-count for the Tasmanian Senate race. I warn that it is complex and around Wonk Factor 4/5 at this stage. The Tasmanian Senate race is complicated by the state’s high below-the-line voting rates and especially by the below-the-line voter rebellions against the preselection demotions of Lisa Singh to sixth on the Labor ticket and Richard Colbeck to fifth on the Coalition ticket. … Comment if you wish on Dr Bonham’s website HERE

(Use the TT NEWS Dropdown Menu (top nav bar) for different perspectives on this astonishing result …)

*Lindsay Tuffin has been a journo since 1969, mainly in Tassie …

• Dr Michael Powell in Comments: … Mr Nikolic became a deliberately polarising figure and consciously turned the election into a referendum on himself and his style of politics. The result was resounding rejection. The “Mirabella political rule” dictates the price you pay for becoming the issue. There is one sobering political message. Politicians are there to serve all electors of whatever persuasion, to allow voice to all their concerns and to tolerate even their more annoying gripes. …

• Mike Bolan in Comments: The recent ‘election’ and media hype raise the question of “Why are we so obsessed with marionette political figures like Malcolm, Bill and Tony when, given the serious threats of climate and political instability, our entire country and the fates of those within it should be our focus”? We seem to have reverted to a Punch and Judy show approach to the decisions that will affect our health, wealth and lives …

… Phil na Champassak in Comments: A pox on all your houses. Enter Hamlet: something is rotten in the state of … A general malaise in the Australian polity won the election last night. Our politicians just don’t grasp the fact that voters are sick to death of the current political system whereby they are hounded prior to an election by high profile politicians and their local members, and promised lots of pork on fork, and then once the election is over, there is virtually no longer any contact with the flock for another three years, and the pork may or may not be forthcoming …

Great headline in Suntas: Adios Amigos!

Latest analysis from Dr Kevin Bonham …

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38 Comments

38 Comments

  1. Lyndall

    April 15, 2019 at 8:08 pm

    Even just a handful of votes can make the difference in some electorates, for example GetUp (quoting from The Guardian) refers to the 2007 Federal Election in which Peter Dutton held his seat by just 217 votes.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Lyndall,

    Your desired correction has been implemented.

    — Moderator

  2. Lyndall

    April 15, 2019 at 6:29 pm

    It’s that time again to do some homework and scrutinise the field on offer in your electorate. Sometimes there can be some interesting new Independents or even new parties worth checking out. Preferences do count – possibly more critically for the Senate – so I like to know exactly who or what I’m voting for and I like to vote below the line with deliberate choices… (Thankfully it’s only a half-house election for the Senate).

    In Tasmania, according to one commentator the seats of Bass and Braddon are ones to watch this time around and the more southern electorates are considered fairly safe:
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-04-15/tasmanian-seats-to-watch-in-the-federal-election/10996900

    I’ve come across a website that provides info on all electorates including the 2019 candidates:
    http://www.tallyroom.com.au/aus2019/state2019

    There is also Dr Kevin Bonham’s Tasmanian House of Reps guide for 2019:
    http://kevinbonham.blogspot.com/2019/04/tasmanian-house-of-representatives.html

    I’ve also just received an email from GetUp reminding everyone that, according to the AEC, there are over 500,000 people who are eligible to vote but still aren’t enrolled. This includes 1/3 of all 18 year olds. So I encourage everyone to have a chat with their young relatives or others to make sure they sign up to take part. The rolls close 8pm this Thursday.

  3. TGC

    July 7, 2016 at 11:56 pm

    #35 and others
    8 out 10 voters went for the two majors.

  4. Salamander

    July 6, 2016 at 7:22 pm

    The biggest factor in this result is the Liberal overlord attitude. Not only did they intentionally deprive the most needy, they refused to listen – to the people, their supporters, advisors, or conscience if any possess one.

    Get up didnt cause the landslide, but their supporters helped disseminate the outflow of Liberal sewage to where it would cause the most effective blockages.

    Then enough chose to not follow the party line.

  5. John Wade

    July 5, 2016 at 1:48 pm

    What I bet Brett Whiteley doesn’t know, but what I do know, is that even the very close Liberal establishment in Braddon voted against Brett Whiteley.
    First hand – “After the way he treated us there is no way I would have voted for him”. And “us” is very high profile Liberal members.

  6. Tim Thorne

    July 5, 2016 at 9:59 am

    #30: Erich will look after his own.

  7. mike seabrook

    July 5, 2016 at 12:00 am

    the easiest way out for the libs to get the government is to offer wilkies $500 million hobart hospital/taxpayers money to the lady who won the seat from the libs(briggs) in south australia – 75 or 76 + 1 = 76 or 77 lower house seats.

    est. $500 million ( a hospital or what to be built in 10 years time and paid for by a future government then) should be able to swing it – surely she would not do a windsor or an oakshot and offer a natural liberals seat to the lab-greens. cheaper than uselessly putting a first of many instalments of $500 down a bottomless wyalla black hole for the x party demands.

    But then wilkie could support turnbull to keep his $500 million hobart hospital = which would benefit tassie.

  8. Keith Antonysen

    July 4, 2016 at 7:38 pm

    Whiteley and Nikolic had a reputation in the community of ignoring those they felt were not supporters.

    They did not represent their electorate; and so, were justly bundled out.

  9. Cameron

    July 4, 2016 at 12:37 pm

    Why would Nikolic stay in Tasmania? He’s lived here since, I think 2003 or thereabouts. The local grapevine has it that he only moved here because he thought Bass was his best chance of a federal seat. Worked out well, didn’t it?

    He’ll land somewhere he can still pretend he’s always right without having to be accountable to the public. Heaven knows how inconvenient that can be.

    Perhaps Cory Bernardi is looking for a new chief of staff?

  10. TGC

    July 4, 2016 at 1:03 am

    #8 on the other hand- good to see at least two fine Independents in Pauline Hanson and Darryn Hinch elected. Together with Lambie and NXT (group?) it should be plain sailing for a prosperous future.

  11. TGC

    July 4, 2016 at 12:58 am

    #27 Isn’t that Wilkie hospital built yet?- that was organised year’s ago. Bring in the Chinese.

  12. mike seabrook

    July 3, 2016 at 11:10 pm

    remember the hobart hospital which ms gillard and mr wilkie promised hobart residents will be built.

    has mr wilkie asked mr turnbull whether he will pay for it.

    the $500 million or so could be spent more effectively elsewhere.

  13. mike seabrook

    July 3, 2016 at 10:23 pm

    the voters voted anti-establishment / feral in england/UK – brexit

    the voters voted anti-establishment/feral in australia

    will the trifecta come up and the voters vote anti-establishment/feral in the usa (trump)

  14. Pilko

    July 3, 2016 at 9:05 pm

    #22 That’s right Karl. Don’t be surprised to see Nikolic follow the Ferguson pathway into state or local politics.

  15. bazzabee

    July 3, 2016 at 6:43 pm

    Congratulations Tasmania on ridding yourselves of the so called three Amigos. The truth is that these men were two of whom were insignificant players nothing more than puppets. The third and last Amigo while himself a puppet rejoiced in his notoriety … in my opinion he was a bully a political thug a man whose behaviour would not have been out of place in the Europe of the 1930’s. Not one of the three Amigos will be missed.

    But Tasmania you continue to have a problem. The puppettter remains. Somewhere in the deepest darkest reaches of Southern Tasmania the man who pulled the strings is siting pretty at number one of the Liberal senate ticket. Uncle Otto still has his job and he still has the capacity to cause suffering and misery to hard working families across the State. Until the Liberal Party turn on him and turf him out he will continue to polute the Tasmanian political scene.

    As sure as little eggs and little eggs Uncle Otto will try and replace his three lost puppets with three equally new and nasty puppets in time for the next election. In between times he will no doubt enjoy pulling the strings in the Tasmanian Parliament and within the Tasmanian Liberal party branches.

    Tasmania it isn’t sufficient to simply toss out the puppets you must now work out how to get rid of – once and for all- the man who made the Northern puppets dance.

  16. Leonard Colquhoun

    July 3, 2016 at 4:25 pm

    Agree with Comment 14’s “The voters are not sick of our political system”, albeit with ‘arrangements’ for “system”. The whole set of these ‘arrangements’ has evolved into, yes, a toxic mess, but a mess which can be cleaned up.

    This ‘mess’ seems to me to be a clearly unintended and definitely unwanted consequence of S48 of the Constitution.

  17. Karl Stevens

    July 3, 2016 at 2:23 pm

    I can’t see Andrew Nikolic having to work for the dole now that he has lost Bass. I’m guessing he will reappear on West Tamar Council just to stay close to the publicly-funded gravy train.

  18. Artemisia

    July 3, 2016 at 12:21 pm

    Brett Whiteley can now quietly go back to being a dead artist.

    As a new voter in the electorate of Bass, it gave me delectable pleasure to put Nikolic last……..that was my first action on entering the polling booth – obviously I wasn’t the only one who felt like that. From this election, I wanted nothing more than to see the back of that odious little man. I hope he (and others of his ilk) has learned a lesson from this – treat people like they don’t matter, dismiss them if they happen to disagree with you and they will repay you in kind. As they did. Manifold.

  19. Mark Temby

    July 3, 2016 at 10:48 am

    #19 Pilko, you left out the killing of investment in renewable energy particularly on the west coast. An exceptional job done by one and all under the stewardship of Eric Abetz and Sam McQueston. It’s a pretty easy assessment for the Tasmanian Liberal Party if it seeks recrimination through resignations.

  20. Pilko

    July 3, 2016 at 4:40 am

    Bass blocked Nikolic.

    Delicious!

    As someone said on Twitter last night -“the 16% swing in Bass is everyone Andrew Nikolic has blocked on Twitter”

    Another person observed about Nikolic – “the snatching of the petition from the Doctor last week was the clincher for many”.

    Another person tweeted – “the swing against Nikolic is way bigger than the average swing in Tasmania and nationally. This was personal”.

    Kingborough councillor Dean Winter observed – “13 Libs promised no cuts to education and health. They cut education and health. Don’t complain when Tasmania doesn’t believe you won’t cut Medicare”.

    Greens leader Cassy O’Connor said – “Stunning smack down for the hard Right here in Tasnmania”.

    On social media last night LNP bovver boy Sam Mcquestin blamed GetUp. Will Hodgman’s chief of staff Brad Stansfield agreed.

    Thats funny Sam & Brad. The Amigos actually led charge to destroy NGO’s like GetUp. What did the LNP expect? You picked the fight. You got beat up. Indeed Andrew Nikolic employed same iron fist strategy with the public that Gunns employed when they tried to build the Tamar Valley pulp mill. Nikolic clearly learnt nothing from Gunns. The people of Bass tossed both of them out.

    Nikolic thought he could manage Bass by literally putting up a wall between himself & those who didn’t agree with him. The people of Bass knocked down the wall & ran Nikolic over. Whilst Nikolic was allegedly a very hard worker & personally claimed to have delivered – “$260 million worth of job creating projects in Bass”, Nikolic will more likely be remembered as the angry little control freak who blocked half of his electorate & got himself thrown out.

    All 3 amigos were arrogant to the last, particularly Braddon’s Brett Whiteley.

    Whiteley lost Braddon because he overpromised & under delivered. Infact he did much worse than that. Whiteley actually managed (on a few big issues) to do the exact opposite of what he pitched to voters in 2013.

    In the 2013 federal election lead up Brett Whiteley frequently & loudly accused the Tasmanian state ALP/Greens govt of causing young people to leave Tasmania. Remember that?

    So what did Brett do once elected? Abbott cut Newstart & Brett Whiteley made whipping boys out of Braddon’s unemployed youth. Like the rest of the LNP Brett Whiteley was also in denial about Braddon’s youth ICE problem. Eric Abetz then told young people to go fruit picking or be prepared to move interstate to look for work. Brett Whiteley backed Abetz’s call all the way in Braddon.

    What a hoot!!

    Whiteley promised to look after pensioners then screwed them. Whiteley voted strongly against increasing the age pension. Then a week out from this election he went on radio inferring NW Coast pensioners who were worried about their pensions were “selfish”. According to Mr Whiteley though, everyone in Braddon understood why Mr Whiteley was doing the opposite of what he’d promised. Well no. It would appear Braddon was lying to Brett. How deliciously Shakespearean of them!

    Whiteley failed to deliver mining jobs, rather he delivered failed mines. Like his hard right amigo pals, Whiteley backed the wrong horse in the LNP leadership spill. Whiteley backed the bloke Australia had decided was too much of a dickhead to be PM.

    Whiteley fought with everyone & blustered his way around his electorate like he was gods gift. That’s why Brett Whiteley got the boot. He was the member for Tony Abbott, the LNP, God & then somewhere down the pecking order – the people of Braddon.

    Meanwhile back in the central north i guess Nikolic & Hutchinson’s advisors will now return to their jobs at the Examiner & we will all be expected to act like nothing happened.

    Aint Tassie politics a peach?

  21. Cameron

    July 3, 2016 at 2:26 am

    #5 Really? What a hollow argument. The seat was retained by Michelle O’Byrne for the ALP during the Howard Government years, and earlier retained twice by Warwick Smith for the Libs during the Hawke/Keating era. It’s certainly possible–there are so factors in play that reducing it to a binary Lib-ALP issue is a tad naive.

    And belonging to the party in government didn’t help Nikolic one tiny bit, in fact it seems to have worked against him. You may also have missed an important point of mine–he lost the seat largely because of his attitude to many of his constituents who actually wanted to discuss some of the things he put forward. No debate on them was allowed–not online, not in public, not by email. The People won’t stand for that, and when The People decide you’re toast, any good work undertaken in three years representing the electorate comes to nothing.

    As is widely known, many people who dared to publicly oppose either him or Liberal party policies were pursued via threats to contact their employers, etc etc. I will happily go out on a limb here–Ross Hart is not at all likely to utilise these tactics.

    That, coupled with the healthier 10% margin he’s picked up for the seat, means he’s in with a good chance of holding off a challenger. However, a lot can happen between elections, I’ll grant you that–a lot more than simple binary politics, that’s for sure.

  22. Steve

    July 3, 2016 at 1:55 am

    Nikolic, the man who threatened dissenters’ employment, is himself unemployed.

    Simple pleasures. I am content.

  23. TGC

    July 3, 2016 at 12:41 am

    #14 Oh my God! Not that plaintiff piffle – it’d all be solved if we had a bulk lot of ‘Independents’

  24. phill Parsons

    July 2, 2016 at 11:58 pm

    I find out that Hanson has a Policy of holding a Royal Commission into the climate science.

    The blindfolded and deluded have coalesced into One Nation, ignoring what is happening all around them.

    I hope there is such a commission because, although it will be a big a waste of money on the scale of Heydon into trade unions, in the end the science will triumph because it is evidence not nostalgic wishes.

  25. Simon Warriner

    July 2, 2016 at 10:30 pm

    Phil, a minor quibble if I may. The voters are not sick of our political system. There is little wrong with it that could not be overcome if we elected people whose very presence was not a result of those flaws. We can do that by putting more independent voices into both chambers and diluting the power of the major parties.

    It is the major parties who are the problem and that stems from the very structure of the political party. Its organisational strucuture makes it easy for malign forces to corrupt.

    The corruption of the parties forces their representatives to conform and become clones, limited to “talking points” and slogans, pushing policy prescribed by donor forces for the benefit of the donors, not the voting public. The public are wising up and getting jack of the bullshit, as you have identified.

  26. Pat Synge

    July 2, 2016 at 9:19 pm

    As Kristina Keneally says …

    ‘Shorten fought on policies. Turnbull sat back waiting for the people to elect him’ | Kristina Keneally

    “They did freeze the bulk billing rebate. They did raise fees on pathology and radiology. They did raise the cost of medicines. They did have a task force to privatise the Medicare billing system. They did privatise Medibank. They did try to charge a co-payment for all GP visits.

    And when it comes to scare campaigns, it’s a bit rich to hear moaning from the people who threatened $100 lamb roasts, the wipe out of Whyalla and the dangers of a debt and deficit disaster. Especially when, on their watch, one of Whyalla’s steel works was wiped out, the deficit doubled, and the debt blew out by $100bn.”

    http://gu.com/p/4ntn9/sbl

  27. Phil na Champassak

    July 2, 2016 at 9:07 pm

    A pox on all your houses

    Enter Hamlet: something is rotten in the state of….

    A general malaise in the Australian polity won the election last night.

    Our politicians just don’t grasp the fact that voters are sick to death of the current political system whereby they are hounded prior to an election by high profile politicians and their local members, and promised lots of pork on fork, and then once the election is over, there is virtually no longer any contact with the flock for another three years, and the pork may or may not be forthcoming.

    It is time for the political establishment to recognise that voters will no longer accept to be treated as sheep and that the deciding votes are cast by those that want to punish, once a minority but now becoming an alarmingly sizeable cohort.

    It’s been over 18 years since I cast a primary or secondary vote for either the Coles or Woolies of Australian politics but this time I did just that: going against my instincts I gave Lisa Singh and Richard Colbeck my first and second Senate preferences. I gave Lisa the edge because she was in the unwinnable sixth ticket of her party whilst Richard was given the difficult fifth ticket by his party despite being the most senior federal Tasmanian parliamentarian as Tourism Minister in the recent Turnbull ministry, and a competent one at that.

    Heads need to roll in the organisational wings of the state Liberal and Labor Parties, and the current power structures and alliances of both parties in their parliamentary wings needs a clean out, indeed a total rebuild if they want to remain relevant to the maturing polity.

    Since 2010 Australia has been the unlucky country, conspired by enduring back to back worst prime ministers in our history: Julia(r) Gillard and Tony Abbott(oir).

    Since dodging the bullet with the outset of the GFC, six years have lapsed with the Australian economy going sideways, at a time we were entering into a transition with the end of the mining boom, within the backdrop of a global recession sliding into depression.

    Our politicians being too concerned about holding on to, or seeking power inside the belt-way in Canberra, have failed to coalesce in a bipartisan way to map a path for the national economy to transition to the next phase. Had they done so, this would have allowed for major private sector investments to join the government of the day in building the new economy. Instead, the Australian economy has been in a holding pattern, buffeted by international events whilst its politicians continued to ignore the national interest in favour of sectional interest.

    In the case of Gillard, her government could not articulate a vision beyond the mining tax as she led a minority government, consuming all her political capital by passing through second order priority Labor bills through a hostile Senate.

    Worst still, a lazy Abbott government with a sizeable majority did not focus on the national economic imperative. Three months after Abbott winning the election, a prominent business leader, NAB Chairman, Michael Chaney warned of patchy business confidence in the absence of clear policy from Canberra, compounded by the high exchange rate, a soft labour market, Canberra’s efforts to return the budget into the black and wary consumers saving: all conspiring for the Australian economy to continue its downward slide.

    Courtesy of my first article, 12 March 2014:

    http://oldtt.pixelkey.biz/index.php/article/How-to-kick-start-the-economy-swap-the-paid-

    Over two years later, sadly nothing has changed.

  28. Mike Bolan

    July 2, 2016 at 8:49 pm

    The recent ‘election’ and media hype raise the question of “Why are we so obsessed with marionette political figures like Malcolm, Bill and Tony when, given the serious threats of climate and political instability, our entire country and the fates of those within it should be our focus”? We seem to have reverted to a Punch and Judy show approach to the decisions that will affect our health, wealth and lives.

    Have we become incapable of thinking at a larger scale?

    At the big picture level, federal governments have been reducing Australia’s resilience at a time when it needs to be massively increased to increase our survival prospects – ditching the car industry (200,000 + jobs gone), dumping manufacturing, sacrificing our farmers down, losing our ability to refine our own fuels, cutting our health services, slashing education, attacking foreign countries – all these and more threaten significantly more chaos and uncertainty in our futures.

    Despite this, our political parties and media seem obsessed with making us more reliant on external agents over whom we have no control (e.g. TPP, Rupert). Not only have they made us more susceptible to problems, they have worked to make discussion and debate of such issues less likely with constant diversions into less threatening issues that are easier to think about (e.g. gay marriage, elections).

    Regardless, the threats are frighteningly real and severe. Climate scientists recently noted that the Northern jet streams have started to move to the Southern hemisphere – a trend that if continued could lead to early climate chaos with crop failures, totally unpredictable weather and other radical outcomes. Sudden weather shifts (e.g. frost in mid-summer, heat waves in winter) could entirely rupture normal behavioural and growth patterns in plants and animals as well as disrupt global supply chains which we have allowed to become such a vital part of feeding and supplying ourselves. No-one can predict the results of such atmospheric mixing.

    In 2016 we have experienced fisheries failures (e.g. oysters, coral reefs) due to the warming of sea waters in various ocean currents that changed the biota in large geographic areas. Diseases that were relatively rare are now expanding their areas of influence (e.g. Zika virus) even as we experience a huge growth in antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. Meanwhile drought, bushfires, winds and floods are becoming more severe as climate temperature increases allow millions of tonnes more water to vaporise in our atmosphere.

    Of course these matters are problematic and complex but diverting ourselves onto small scale political matters also diverts our thinking and resources away from increasing our chances of surviving whatever threats are due to emerge.
    We need to be focussing on identifying the most likely threats to our communities and developing effective responses instead of spending billions to avoid terrorist threats (for example) that are tiny by comparison, and are mainly stimulated by our own attacks on foreign peoples.

    The benefits of doing that includes avoiding wasting our lives on pointless diversions by giving us priorities that are more likely to serve us into the future. Why waste our time thinking about 2 competing 19th century dogma, when we can be working with our family, friends and neighbours, indeed with our whole country, to secure a better future for ourselves?

  29. Chris

    July 2, 2016 at 8:03 pm

    Nick Or Lick has been reduced to the ranks and a wooma has it that he has ordered a reverse parachute to exit the state.
    White out has been pasted all over the page and has accepted a chap lines position where he can preach his eye deals to the converted.
    Rabbits are feeling safe after their Hutch has been replaced with a better means of housing.
    Abbott sends his utmost regretful feelings for these three ….souls.

    The grand old Duke of Wentworth,
    Had 10 thousand men
    He marched them up to the top of the hill.
    And he marched them down again
    When they wus up they was up
    and when they wus down he got nasty..

  30. pat synge

    July 2, 2016 at 7:14 pm

    Whatever the final washup it’s great to see the three amigos gone. Especially Nikolic.

    As for the Liberals anger and over the Mediscare campaign I think Kristina Kenneally summed it up well when she wrote:

    “They did freeze the bulk billing rebate. They did raise fees on pathology and radiology. They did raise the cost of medicines. They did have a task force to privatise the Medicare billing system. They did privatise Medibank. They did try to charge a co-payment for all GP visits.

    And when it comes to scare campaigns, it’s a bit rich to hear moaning from the people who threatened $100 lamb roasts, the wipe out of Whyalla and the dangers of a debt and deficit disaster. Especially when, on their watch, one of Whyalla’s steel works was wiped out, the deficit doubled, and the debt blew out by $100bn.”

    Maybe Shorten should have hired her to write his speeches.

  31. Simon Warriner

    July 2, 2016 at 6:15 pm

    re this utter nonsense at #2:

    “Much as ‘governing for all’ is a worthy aim it’s not real politics”

    Politics is the art of the possible, the job of getting the best outcome from the circumstances that prevail at the time. Whether that be that on the dance floor or in the workplace or in parliament, getting the best outcome requires considering and responding appropriately to the needs and desires of others. Insisting on getting ones own way just does not work, and it is therefor not “real politics”. What it is is greedy, selfish, narcissistic, parasitic, and bloody stupid.

    What is inherent and implicit in TGC’s retort at the rejection of his desired outcome is a complete misunderstanding of the role our elected representatives must play if we are to survive and prosper, especially in the face of adversity and uncertain times. Those who think that their economic advantage and good fortune trumps their numeric inferiority and gives them the right to dictate to the rest of us, and favour their ilk with $50 billion tax cuts at the expense of health, education and the addressing of real structural issues in our economy, got a gentle warning last night. It is one they would do well to pay attention to. History tells us that failure to learn from them can be a rather brutal experience.

    I would hope that from this point on we see a much more humble liberal party presence, more focused on understanding and delivering for the less well of among our community, and less devoted to putting taxpayers money in the pockets of their mates with the excuse that some of it might trickle down into the pockets of those lucky enough to get dripped on by Jobson Growth. I would also expect that the labor party would take note and adopt similar behaviors but I won’t be holding my breath.

  32. phill Parsons

    July 2, 2016 at 5:48 pm

    Regardless of the Declaration of the Polls by the end of the month the elephant remains in the room – global heating.

    For those not wearing a blue blindfold or suffering from delusions along with their conservatism can understand the evidence and i’s tracking with the modelling forecasts.

    Whether Australia soon launches into a transition to renewable energy or remains in the dark ages depends on the behavior of the mix of Senators the voters have sent to Canberra.

    Hanson may be back, but is she the same Pauline or simply one trying to be halal free but re-electable in the State that has the disappearing Reef. NXT is from a State that gets the message about energy.

    However long to the next Federal election some Senators will have to face the people again and a quota may need 14.29% after preferences are distributed and all the voters will have had a practice run with the potential exhausted vote process of numbering at least 6 above or 12 below in a DD election.

    Turnbull is angry. Perhaps with the policies, perhaps with the party machine or even the voters. Whatever, when you allow yourself to become a puppet of unpopular measures and unable to offer more than tax cuts for the already rich and no guarantee of social justice for the working poor you can be sure Howard’s battlers will understand that in boom times they can count for largesse but in busts they simply become the casualties of the neo con globalization agenda.

    Partly we have seen an Australian Brexit vote from the forgotten people.

    All parties will take a lesson from this result as the Greens begin to capture the votes if not the fealty of the young and the urban around ‘progressive’ policies whilst the old parties either remain tied to their past or out of touch with the aspirations of the many.

    If any party remains wedded to dated ideas they will disappear

  33. oh-owe

    July 2, 2016 at 5:29 pm

    It’s not poor Andrew’s fault!! As Erica says, it’s the Turnbull superannuation policy that swept the Three Amigos, and their masters, from their seats!

    Clearly the vast majority of the people they represent were terrified of the threat to their millions in super.

    I think Erica illustrates the extreme right’s cognitive dissonance.

  34. TGC

    July 2, 2016 at 5:23 pm

    #4 Ah, but can he keep it if there is a non-Labor Government in Canberra? And don’t be wet about this: why would a political party in Government do all it can to get an opposing political candidate re-elected? The Bass voters have said very strongly- ‘we want nothing to do with the Liberals – (Coalition}’
    You make yer bed…!

  35. Cameron

    July 2, 2016 at 4:52 pm

    A couple of points on this–and then I want to give the horrid little twerp absolutely no more oxygen.

    Firstly, this is not Malcolm’s fault, not GetUp’s fault, not the Greens’ fault, it’s his fault. Because he chose to deal with people who questioned in such an adversarial and uncompromising manner–very much in the manner of the common schoolyard bully. It doesn’t really matter what you manage to achieve–if you treat people badly, people will respond accordingly and I think they have in this election.

    GetUp helped, of course, but so did stupid own goals like threatening not to debate with the Greens cadidate until she pulled out so he had no choice etc etc and having this excused by ‘Liberal Party Policy’ which is possibly fictitious and was certainly applied very selectively (ie. only to Nikolic, it seems). That episode made Nikolic look especially foolish.

    Secondly, here’s an interesting thing: Nikolic won Bass with 4% in 2013, from a Labor incumbent who for whatever reason didn’t really campaign all that strongly–and still, Nikolic only won it by 4%. Ross Hart has won the seat back on at least 10%, so the margin is vastly increased–conclusion of which is, when faced an opponent who represented some actual competition for the seat, Nikolic just couldn’t bring it.

    Yep, so sad, what’s for dinner?

  36. Russell

    July 2, 2016 at 2:37 pm

    The best election result are the 3 Tasmanian Liberals being ousted as a result of their poor political performance, not that they were replaced by anything better.

    The best part of the election coverage was the little photoshopped Lord Of The Rings skit played on the Sunday ABC Insiders program.

  37. TGC

    July 2, 2016 at 1:15 pm

    It could be tough going for Tasmania
    Much as ‘governing for all’ is a worthy aim it’s not real politics and the Labor MHR’s may not carry much negotiating weight should the Coalition retain government- even with ‘Independent’ support-prticularly during the learning curve which will need to be pretty short.

    The Senate- well almost impossible to predict outcomes on any legislation and it loooks a bit ominous for the next six years- three at least.
    Interesting to see market reaction on Monday.

  38. Dr Michael Powell

    July 2, 2016 at 1:03 pm

    Without taking anything from the success of Ross Hart in the election in Bass, it is clear a quite unusual electoral swing took place. You have to go back to the Bass by-election of 1975 to see a comparable swing.

    There is no doubt Mr Nikolic was an energetic member and heavily pork barrelled the electorate so you have to pause to explain the result. Obviously just tipping vast amounts on the electorate is not enough.

    Mr Nikolic became a deliberately polarising figure and consciously turned the election into a referendum on himself and his style of politics. The result was resounding rejection. The “Mirabella political rule” dictates the price you pay for becoming the issue.

    There is one sobering political message. Politicians are there to serve all electors of whatever persuasion, to allow voice to all their concerns and to tolerate even their more annoying gripes.

    Those are the simple democratic principals that mark our system and our politicians need to renew that commitment in what is going to be a turbulent period ahead.

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