Tasmanian Times

Economy

Tanya MLC: I’ve never been up Mt Wellington … but I’d like to shop there …

State Parliament has moved to open up Hobart’s Mount Wellington to development, with one MLC happy to see shopping on the summit.

All but one Upper House MP have backed a Liberal plan to remove the Mount Wellington Park Management Trust’s power to veto developments.

The Independent Member for Western Tiers, Greg Hall, hopes that will clear the way for developers to build a cable car to the summit.

He thinks the South African city of Cape Town provides a model for Hobart.

“Table Mountain, a piece of rock very similar to Mount Wellington, has a cable car going up there,” he said.

Independent Apsley MLC Tania Rattray has never been up Mount Wellington, but thinks she would if there were shops at the summit.

“It would be a fantastic opportunity.”

Government MLC Craig Farrell also backed the change, with Rob Valentine the only MP against it.

ABC here

• don knowler, in Comments: everytime i read of a push for development on mt wellington i look out of my kitchen window and see that the summit is shrouded in cloud. this morning you couldn’t even see the mountain. let’s hope the shops tania rattray is so keen to see up there sell raincoats. and as for greg hall comparing mt wellington to table mountain in cape town, he needs to google a picture of the south african peak (he can’t have been there) to see that its cable car rises to the summit in one span. table mountain actually overhangs cape town and is not 10 kilometres or so away. enough of this nonsense and let’s see sensible unobtrusive development at the springs. restoring the long-lost native gardens there would be a start.

• Sue DeNim, in Comments: Oh how frightfully telling of the intellect (or lack there of) of our blundering MLC’s. Greg Hall just happens to totally neglect the fact that CapeTown has a totally different latitude and hence micro-climate than Hobart and also has a population of, wait for it, 3.74 million. But oh yes it and Hobart a quite similar? I would like to think Tania’s comment might be out of context or said in jest, but if not, that a Hobart resident has never visited the mountain and would only see fit to do so if there were shops there exposes her to be vacuous in the extreme. What that says about us who elect them is very cringeworthy.

• Pilko, in Comments: Imagine it. Pop up the hill in the cable car after work. A few beers, counter meal, keno, one arm bandits & then do your late night shopping at Woolworths on Big Bend. Tania & her fellow Timber Communities Australia members could hold their next state conference at the new summit convention centre. You know it makes sense.

Karl Stevens: Do your Christmas shopping at Rat-Ray Mall

• Shaun, in Comments: This is Australia where the concept of a National Park or other conservation area generally means that it has minimal development. It’s not the USA, we don’t need to have accommodation huts complete with hot showers and household furniture, restaurants and so on up there and we certainly don’t need an assortment of national chain retail stores. Nor do we need a cable car. Such things are by no means unique whereas the idea of driving up a mountain in your own car (or a rented one) *is* somewhat unique to Australian visitors to Hobart. It’s like the debate about transport. No visitor to Hobart is going to be overly impressed with a bus ride or for that matter a tram. They might serve a functional purpose, but they sure aren’t “tourist attractions”. In contrast, the Mona catamaran is at least a little bit unusual, as would be a hovercraft or getting around on a steam train.

• Gwenda Sheridan, in Comments: It is so sad to see the comments made by senior decision makers in respect of Mount Wellington. What is even sadder, if not tragic is that there is so little awareness of cultural landscape, (or heritage or historic landscape), its recognition and meanings in Tasmania. The rest of the world moves on; Tasmania appears not to want to. We can stop repeating the mantra that “beauty lies in the eye of the beholder” and become more informed. Much more informed. For anyone interested take a look at …

• Jon Sumby, in Comments: Actual quote from Rattray; ‘I am not sure whether I should confess, but I have never been to the top of Mount Wellington. When a girl comes from the country into the city, she usually likes to shop, and as far as I know not much retail therapy happens on the top of Mount Wellington. That could effectively change if there were some facilities on top of the mountain.’

• Pilko, in Comments: This morning 2000++ people including many from interstate & overseas ran to the summit of Mt.Wellington in what has become one of Hobart’s most iconic & well patronised sporting events – The Point to Pinnacle. Walkers, runners, people of all ages, shapes & sizes. How many times has the Apsley MLC visited Hobart now? I’d dare say a few hundred, maybe more. Yet after all this time one of Tasmania’s greatest natural icons is still not worth a trip in the car for Rattray-Wagner because Mt.Wellington doesnt have a Katies or Sussans. Rattray-Wagner has now told us. Mt Wellington means nothing to me because i cant consume it. Theres nothing for me to take away. Tells you a lot about how this champion of the logging industry sees her island home

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44 Comments

44 Comments

  1. TV Resident

    November 17, 2013 at 8:14 pm

    Justa Bloke…There are monkeys in an enclosure in City Park in Launceston. But the most horrible ones are in Parliament house for very little time, although they are paid ‘full time’ wages+++++.

  2. Justa Bloke

    November 17, 2013 at 4:12 pm

    “The monkeys in City Park”, Shaun (#43)? Surely you mean Cataract Gorge?

  3. Robin Halton

    November 17, 2013 at 12:46 am

    Too many suffering from Rattray Wagner sickness, get over it, she was only pulling the leg to stir up the anti establishment.
    Nobody really knows what they want, I have heard that the Hobart City Council might close the road from the Springs, serious OH & S problems have emerged due to Climate Change, the geology supporting the road is deemed as unstable, suck that!

  4. Shaun

    November 16, 2013 at 8:04 pm

    Visiting Hobart regularly and never having gone up Mt Wellington is a bit like visiting Sydney regularly and never having been to Circular Quay.

    Or going to Launceston a hundred times and never having seen the monkeys in City Park. Or going to London whilst steering clear of underground trains, red buses, clock towers and anything that looks even remotely like a palace or castle.

    Something seems rather odd about all this…..

  5. Barbara Mitchell

    November 16, 2013 at 7:19 pm

    It always astounds me to meet Tasmanians who have never been to the top of Mt Wellington. Why aren’t they taken there as schoolchildren on a mandatory excursion, like kids in NSW go to the state parliament and the Opera House?

    And the fact that an elected representative of the people of Tasmania can, without a trace of embarrassment, admit to having no personal experience of the state’s most iconic natural feature, clearly indicates that small-minded parochialism is alive and well in our state.

    Ms Rattray’s devotion to her ‘patch’ is the stuff of self-made political legend, but alas, the legend may be a ruse. Perhaps travelling regularly to the big smoke to sit in the LegCo is a well-paid cover for her true vocation – shopping!

  6. pilko

    November 16, 2013 at 2:40 pm

    This morning 2000++ people including many from interstate & overseas ran to the summit of Mt.Wellington in what has become one of Hobart’s most iconic & well patronised sporting events – The Point to Pinnacle. Walkers, runners, people of all ages, shapes & sizes.

    How long now has the Apsley MLC been visiting Hobart? I’d dare say a few hundred, maybe more.

    Yet after all this time one of Tasmania’s greatest natural icons is still not worth a trip in the car for Rattray-Wagner because Mt.Wellington doesnt have a Katies or Sussans.

    Rattray-Wagner has now told us. Mt Wellington means nothing to me because i cant consume it. Theres nothing for me to take away.

    Tells you a lot about how this champion of the logging industry sees her island home

  7. Artemisia

    November 16, 2013 at 12:20 pm

    #34 Jon – and therin lies our big problem. Rattray-Wagner has not been to the summit of Mt Wellington, despite the fact that you can drive to the bloody top! And despite the fact that she has to leave her North East enclave at least sometimes to go to Hobart and pretend to represent her electorate.

    Her quote proves that she and others like her, have no concept of the value of anything if it doesn’t involve consumerism……How do these people ever get into positions of power?

    The concept of true wilderness – the kind you can’t drive to or in (and there is precious little of that left in this world!) – would not even register on the radars of these people. They have no idea of the intrinsic value of wild places.

    Heaven help us!

  8. Robin Halton

    November 16, 2013 at 9:07 am

    The problem remains for areas such as Mt Wellington, the push for public funding for the Cable Car by the establishment to prove that they are in charge and they know best!

    Tourism chief Luke Martin obviously is interested in the supermarket approach to tourism regardless of the consequences for the natural environment, Luke does not know any better.

    Anyone that understands the Cairns Skyway, realises that it attracts masses of tourists venture and often combines the journey to or from Freshwater to Kuranda by train.

    The cautious observer will also note the Skyway passes over Rainforest cover and the apparatii is not apparent from almost all view points.

    Skyway is well designed to protect landscape and environment as the location is suitable.

    #32 Phil Parsons, I too would imagine it would be hard to survive in Kuranda, avoid the bloody rubbish on offer at the market but enjoy the return trip.

  9. mikey

    November 16, 2013 at 3:49 am

    Maybe it’s time for a comprehensive survey of visitors to the mountain to find out what the attraction was, I’m guessing for the spectacular views or when present to play in the snow. I look forward to taking visitors to the summit (not halfway up) and staying a lot longer than we do now when we have a visitor centre that is warm and comfortable.

  10. Robin Halton

    November 16, 2013 at 1:40 am

    I dont really know what all the excitement is about, Tanya Rattray’s comments are trivial chat, perhaps she is just having a shot at the anti development brigade.

    The Mountain facing the city would have landscape management zoning of “A” and any operation involving development on a linear or theredimensional basis should result in inevident visual impact as seen from the city near sea level(Derwent Estuary) and other prominent points above the city area.

    I think it is important to preserve the landscape integrity of the city face of the mountain, any development at the Springs should be inevident.

    We already have the TV towers on top of the mountain which are in fact are eye sores as is Ogilvies Scar.

    Given that there is an “all” weather road to the top of the mountain there is virtually no case for a Cable Car.

    I have no problems with a private investment at the Springs as long as public facilites for outdoor leisure are maintained, barbeques ,shelters, car parking and toilets.

  11. Bonni Hall

    November 15, 2013 at 9:24 pm

    She is obviously so shallow that if you dived into her you would break your neck!

  12. Karl Stevens

    November 15, 2013 at 7:26 pm

    Jon Sumby 34. Thanks for providing the quote. Maybe if they put parliament on top of Mount Wellington the country girl from Apsley could shop and represent her electorate as well (in that order).

  13. Jon Sumby

    November 15, 2013 at 4:44 pm

    Actual quote from Rattray; ‘I am not sure whether I should confess, but I have never been to the top of Mount Wellington. When a girl comes from the country into the city, she usually likes to shop, and as far as I know not much retail therapy happens on the top of Mount Wellington. That could effectively change if there were some facilities on top of the mountain.’

  14. Gwenda Sheridan

    November 15, 2013 at 11:07 am

    It is so sad to see the comments made by senior decision makers in respect of Mount Wellington.
    What is even sadder, if not tragic is that there is so little awareness of cultural landscape, (or heritage or historic landscape), its recognition and meanings in Tasmania. The rest of the world moves on; Tasmania appears not to want to.
    We can stop repeating the mantra that “beauty lies in the eye of the beholder” and become more informed. Much more informed. For anyone interested take a look at http://www.patternlanguage.com be even more pro-active and read the four books by Christopher Alexander called The Nature of Order. This is not some modern-day guru with fanciful ideas. This is a lifetime of research, by a truly amazing man (and his cohorts) with a message we all need. A wakeup call if you like. It is ground breaking visionary research and ideas gathered across a life time of teaching, exploration into what we might do to those places and spaces we develop and all too often destroy. The landscapes experienced, our cities, suburbs, homes –spaces and places – that we interact with on a daily basis.
    For Hobartians Mount Wellington is one of those places. It is iconic and its “culturally evolved landscapes” can be so easily destroyed.
    The artist Marianne North who travelled the world painting landscapes and vegetation and whose painting archive hangs at the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, noted about Mount Wellington in 1881,
    ‘few capitals in the world have such a wild mountain-side near them.’ [Helen Vellacott (ed). Marianne North in Australia and New Zealand. 1892. This edition Elm Grove Press. 1986. 94.]

    We might think about this while cogitating on the word “wild” (as distinct from wilderness)…

    Geographer, Professor Michael Crang in 1998 warned us that landscapes can be engineered, their culture commodified for financial gain. If places are becoming increasingly alike, the rewards for standing out are increasing….. [M. Crang. Cultural Geography. Routledge. 1998 revised 2008.]

    The rewards for standing out are increasing…

    Tasmania’s strength in my humble opinion….
    Gwenda Sheridan

  15. phill Parsons

    November 15, 2013 at 9:37 am

    It won’t be another MONA.

    Will Rattray come up to Mt Roland to shop?.

    It too is lined up for a cable car.

    Kunming has a ski lift type cable car onto its Western Hills. Population 5 million plus visitors.

    Cairns has over 1.5 million visitors coming to the reef and rainforest, some using the skyrail

    I wish the businesses running the cableway and associated shopping well but they should take note of the closed cableways of the world and visit Kuranda to see what a tourism dependent town is like in a downturn.

  16. Robin Halton

    November 15, 2013 at 1:46 am

    #27 Shaun I like your comments about the Mountain except for the helicopters buzzing around.
    The clowns wanting to build 5* huts within the close confines of the Three Capes Great Escape venture are looking at a similar distraction using helicopters regularly over a natural environment.
    What do you think of my #25 and later continuations.
    I too have so far avoided attaining the Mt summit and kept major activities down at the Springs.
    Issues facing Hobart are finding PRACTICAL and less car dependent transport facilites for locals including catering for visitors now that David Walsh has kick started our local economy with MONA!

  17. Robin Halton

    November 15, 2013 at 1:25 am

    Here it is ,the continuation of #25.

    So OK I established a need for a better option to deal with the major restrictions because of limited engineering solutions to the topographical problems affecting daily transport from the south of the city, through the city to the rest of the world beyond Central Hobart.

    Combining a daily commuter route from Margate to the city with a tourism orientated drawcard into one!
    Perhaps a suspended OVERHEAD electric rail link from the Central city, up Davey St- Mt Nelson-Southern Outlet- Kingston- Margate primarily catering for commuters early am and Mid pm during the weekdays.
    The Tourism aspect of this proposal would be from a location somewhere south of Tolmans Hill on the Southern Outlet a spur Rail link (Stage 2) west of the Lea – Badger Hill following closer to Summerleas Rd along a narrow corridor, level with the eucalypt treetops, terminating at the Springs.
    The Springs was always going to be a tourism development and is supported by the Greens to the best of my knowledge.

    The idea is about managing the mountain’s landscape, by using modern engineering modelling to accomodate an unnatural or otherwise obtrusive mobile or stationary structure(s) for the benefit of human progress in a considerate manner.

    I do not have a solution to attain the Summit of Mt Wellington with suspended machinery as I am well aware of the sensitive landscape issues involved.

    Part of Stage 1 would in itself would also provide an interesting scenic tour also inspiring for commuters, above the city to and from Mt Nelson at(Proctors Saddle)on route.

    Part of Stage 2 up as far as Ferntree could capture some interesting views of the D’entrecastreaux Channel/ Bruni Is and Mountain Ranges to the south beyond Huonville.

    While local councils and State govt authorities fight for their own individual preferences over Cable Car, virtually nobody has really bothered to look at the broader picture for the Greater Hobart region.

    I think that the Light rail concept has to start where is is most needed with add on long term economic benefits too.

    To be continued later. Comments from intersted parties please! Thanks.

  18. Heather Donaldson

    November 14, 2013 at 10:18 pm

    OMG ! I am still squirming. How can we deserve these “leaders” ?

  19. Shaun

    November 14, 2013 at 10:00 pm

    In general I’m in favour of development and often disagree with those opposed to it.

    But this idea of commercialising the Mountain for the sake of it is beyond ridiculous.

    As it stands today, Mt Wellington is a feature of Hobart. Thankfully a road was built up it during the 1930’s, that’s a good thing not a bad one in my opinion, but there’s nothing of note to be gained by rampant development. It serves a useful function as a location for TV transmitters, as one of the 3 main water catchments serving the greater Hobart region and as a scenic viewpoint over the city.

    Some modest improvements might make sense, but not to the point of turning it into an elevated form of suburbia. Some extra hand rails near the lookout etc to stop people slipping on ice would be a good place to start, and it’s ridiculous that the lookout building isn’t at least semi-warm inside (especially given that there’s electricity easily available nearby). But that’s really about the limit of what it needs.

    This is Australia where the concept of a National Park or other conservation area generally means that it has minimal development. It’s not the USA, we don’t need to have accommodation huts complete with hot showers and household furniture, restaurants and so on up there and we certainly don’t need an assortment of national chain retail stores.

    Nor do we need a cable car. Such things are by no means unique whereas the idea of driving up a mountain in your own car (or a rented one) *is* somewhat unique to Australian visitors to Hobart.

    It’s like the debate about transport. No visitor to Hobart is going to be overly impressed with a bus ride or for that matter a tram. They might serve a functional purpose, but they sure aren’t “tourist attractions”. In contrast, the Mona catamaran is at least a little bit unusual, as would be a hovercraft or getting around on a steam train.

    If we’re going to do something on Mt Wellington then make it unique. Provided that the flight path is appropriate, helicopter flights from somewhere close to the CBD might make some sense. It provides practical access for those who don’t want to drive or walk up, and it’s an actual “tourist attraction” since a large proportion of the population has never ridden in a helicopter.

    Noise could be a downside with helicopters, but an appropriate choice of flight path and limiting the hours of operation are realistic workarounds. It also has the advantage of minimal impact both physically and financially. If there turns out to be no demand then the helicopters can always be sold thus limiting the financial loss.

  20. Justa Bloke

    November 14, 2013 at 8:59 pm

    We should follow the Welsh example. They dug up some of their mountains for gravel to build roads so that the tourists could more easily drive to the mountains so as to enjoy the scenery.

    The proposed shopping mall could be built much closer to sea level if the mountain was turned into something more economically valuable.

  21. Robin Halton

    November 14, 2013 at 4:54 pm

    I have a possible solution for the Riverline NLSR concept and the Cable Car push within the Greater Hobart Region.

    Possibly the first thing is to gauge where the greatest transport problems lie within the GHR!

    I always tend to think of the Kingbourgh, Channell Huon region with the daily grind for motorists crossing the “great divide” between Central Hobart and the rest of Tasmania, including those who work in the city too.

    There is no way of stopping growth in the Southern region, it remains as a desirable place to live and enjoy life.

    The part believable and nuisance value Gehl report for the CBD has FAILED to deliver a solution to pacify daily traffic numbers, particularly during peak hours dividing the CBD from the waterfront.
    For instance, cycle path requiremnet for the city cannot be properly managed until some changes are made to the parts of the city where heavy traffic has priority!

    The Macquarie/ Davey Hwy sees to that as there is no alternative for any other mode of transport to compete with cars and trucks.

    Metro has been unable to solve the problem either, with an attempt to use ride and park from Kingston and seperate bus lanes.

    Tasmania’s Special(Sustainable) Minister for Transport Nick McKim and Metro CEO Heather Hasselgrove trialled the idea for a while but was not all that effective as far as I know!

    What I indend to do is to look at a joint solution that could satisfy the Cable car concept to the Mountain and at the same time finds a solution to reduce motorists dependence on the daily grind up and down the Southern Outlet from a far away as Margate into the City.

    As I am currently using up my otherwise valuable time I will in touch again within the next day or two to inform the readers of my “Wacky” idea, as it might sound for some readers!

    In the meantime think about which part of Greater Hobart is worst affected by access to the city and beyond!
    How could both commuters, leisure seekers and cruise ship tourists benefit, think about it!

  22. Jon Sumby

    November 14, 2013 at 1:42 pm

    I think an ideal tourist attraction would be a replica of the Statue of Liberty on top of the mountain…

  23. PB

    November 14, 2013 at 1:25 pm

    It is a sad reflection of our politicians’ parochialism and ignorance that they fail to understand that Tasmania’s greatest asset and economic driver is its unique environment which they are hell bent on destroying for a quick buck.

  24. Mike

    November 14, 2013 at 12:44 pm

    I think I’ll forward Tania Rattray’s statement on to Tony Abbott. If he needs further justification as to why he has few woman in his Cabinet – this will be a good one!

  25. Sue DeNim

    November 14, 2013 at 12:21 pm

    Very well said Philip. I couldn’t agree more. Why do we feel we have to have something MORE for tourists to come and see. Maybe as you say, they are coming to see Hobart just as it is. In trying to please the minor few of ever unsatisfieds, you will turn away the already satisfieds.

    As is often the case, and often forgotten I suspect this debate is largely driven by over eager real estate speculators and developers. What do they care if anything they design or have built becomes just another useless, unfrequented, over subsidised eyesore. As long as they get their commission for the design and development, they are sweet. They’ll just move onto the next one.

    Just say no Hobart and get on with your urban light rail system. Something that will actually assist tourists and residents alike.

  26. Philip Cocker

    November 14, 2013 at 11:42 am

    From published Letter to the Merc.

    The mountain and its environs are a tremendous asset to Hobart and its people based on its natural values. It provides us with drinking water, recreation, clean air, visual beauty, and maintains a variety of habitats and ecosystems for us.

    The current debate is around helipads, cable cars, shops, restaurants and cafes and exploiting it to maximise the short term money we can make from developing it. Why is it so hard to respect it for what it is and what it gives us? Why must we make it like everywhere else with coffee and food available? Aren’t we well fed enough?

    Must we do the same as everywhere else?

    What’s wrong with a natural experience that might be a bit cold or windy or snowing? What’s wrong with an experience that isn’t the same as an air conditioned shopping mall?

    Given the number of visitors to the sight could it be that its real attraction is as a natural site where you can’t guarantee the conditions or what might you might on a given day. I have experienced the mountain with visitors and make the comment to them that we will have to wait and see what it is like when we get there. Is that not a big part of the appeal?

    I have been there when it has been windy, wet, cold, snowing, warm, sunny, cloudy and clear and have enjoyed it every time as have the visitors I have taken there. Why bland it the same?

    Why shouldn’t it remain a unique unpredictable experience different from other places?

    Lets us have a discussion about what’s best bearing in mind we have something unique that attracts people galore and it might just be right the way it is.

  27. Garry Stannus

    November 14, 2013 at 11:05 am

    Maybe, as Hyro Tas did in Sarawak, we can export our skills and knowledge, once finely honed on Wellington (God, but we had a fixation on the Duke, n’est-ce pas?) from Hobart Town to Uluru. And then, dear fellow developmentalists, next stop Fuji … it’d save all the scourge of walking. If Fuji, then why not Kilimanjaro? Perhaps we’d have a boutique (respectable classes only) shop, selling books by Hemmingway, back from the dead. And then … Le Sommet … Everest! Past the crevasses, pausing to view the un-retrieved remains of past climbers, and a Starbucks at the top. ‘I did Everest!’ And back in the bar, down at final camp, the photo booth backdrops … me with Tensing … me with the Dalai Lama … me with Marilyn … me with my dreams.

    I love development. Let’s develop at all costs. Lets pave Wellington with tar and cement. How else can we progress this poor State? Think of the jobs … there’d be work for everyone, pick and shovel, saw and splitter. People power! Down the bottom a treadmill powered by the poor and undeserving. Along the slopes the oxen carts now replaced with teams of men, cheerfully drawing the timber from the slopes, meeting yet another target set by the Great leader.

    Oh, but there will always be the naysayers. Indeed.

    ‘William!’

    ‘Sir?’

    ‘Another of the same, if you please. And don’t overdo the tonic this time.’

    ‘Yes Minister.’

  28. Rom Springall

    November 13, 2013 at 9:36 pm

    Is this the best we can do? A dopey Politician’s whose best attempt at innovation is to suggest we put shops on top of Mt Wellington? Is it any wonder this state is such a mess when the best our “leaders” can come up with is this kind of tripe. The Wellington Park Authority is in place to stop the likes of Ratray and whats his face and any attempt to attack our environment in the name of big business will be dealt with in the same manner as Gunns.

  29. John Hawkins

    November 13, 2013 at 9:34 pm

    Bunnings with cable logging access for the dare devil shopaholic: “The highest places are just the beginning”!

    Go for it Tania and Greg you will be backed all the way by TGC and the Examiner.

  30. Karl Stevens

    November 13, 2013 at 9:21 pm

    The experiment to find out what happens when tens of thousands of convicts are dumped at the end of the earth and left to fend for themselves is reaching it’s conclusion. Apparently they develop a fake legal and parliamentary system before completely obliterating their immediate surroundings. Interestingly, those who question their insanity are reviled and regarded as heretics.

  31. john Hayward

    November 13, 2013 at 4:54 pm

    The argument is pretty well clinched by the opinion of Greg Hall, whose economic and aesthetic credentials are manifest from his undying support of logging on the Western Tiers.

    When Mayor on the Meander Valley Council, he also saw off an effort to introduce scenic protection regulations.

    John Hayward

  32. Steve Webber

    November 13, 2013 at 3:44 pm

    Thank god these muppets are not managing Uluru.

  33. pilko

    November 13, 2013 at 1:39 pm

    Imagine it.

    Pop up the hill in the cable car after work.

    A few beers, counter meal, keno, one arm bandits & then do your late night shopping at Woolworths on Big Bend.

    Tania & her fellow Timber Communities Australia members could hold their next state conference at the new summit convention centre.

    You know it makes sense.

  34. Karl Stevens

    November 13, 2013 at 1:35 pm

    I’m sure the member for Apsley would find the food hall on Mt Wellington has a tremendous view.

  35. TV Resident

    November 13, 2013 at 1:31 pm

    I have always been under the impression that this state was run by fools and now I am convinced. Why are we so intent on making iconic things in Tasmania the double-acts of other places. The beauty of the ‘natural’ icons we have here are unique and also the reason people come to visit. If we make them the same as other places why would anyone bother to come across Bass Strait to see them?? I am utterly ashamed of the idiots who make these stupid decisions to mimic other places.

  36. Cable Car Enthusiast of Dodges

    November 13, 2013 at 1:12 pm

    This comment comes from a person (more like a clown) who has never been to the top of the mountain. This just highlights the calibre of the person in this hideous Tasmanian Upper House whose sole purpose originally was to look after the interests of the Free Settlers who were given large tracts of Tasmania’s land, confiscated from the original inhabitants and then to add insult to injury these arrogant cretins then exterminated all of the original inhabitants. Is there any redeeming qualities in the Anglo Saxon breed, of which I am one??

    I digress, getting back to the mountain, certainly not this stupid suggestion by this person, to “Shop until you drop, ontop”, but I think the idea of a Cable Car is a good one, discreetly positioned. Some sort of Coffee Shop built into the top would also have merit, but it would need to be well disguised. I recall a comment from my X who was from Europe stating that she was horrified to see a road leading to the top, “you Aussies can’t walk anywhere, you have to drive even to the top of your most beautiful mountains”

    So, come on, let’s build the damned Cable Car (it’s no worse than a road!) and generate some work for the fluro brigade of which I’m one.

  37. Harry Luster

    November 13, 2013 at 12:53 pm

    Yes #2, but what genes !!
    The member for Apsley has obviously been to Hong Kongs’ Victoria Peak but was the Swarovski stuff the real thing?….Harry

  38. don knowler

    November 13, 2013 at 12:43 pm

    everytime i read of a push for development on mt wellington i look out of my kitchen window and see that the summit is shrouded in cloud. this morning you couldn’t even see the mountain. let’s hope the shops tania rattray is so keen to see up there sell raincoats. and as for greg hall comparing mt wellington to table mountain in cape town, he needs to google a picture of the south african peak (he can’t have been there) to see that its cable car rises to the summit in one span. table mountain actually overhangs cape town and is not 10 kilometres or so away. enough of this nonsense and let’s see sensible unobtrusive development at the springs. restoring the long-lost native gardens there would be a start.

  39. stephen

    November 13, 2013 at 12:02 pm

    Heaven help us from these people!

  40. Sue DeNim

    November 13, 2013 at 11:05 am

    Oh how frightfully telling of the intellect (or lack there of) of our blundering MLC’s.
    Greg Hall just happens to totally neglect the fact that CapeTown has a totally different latitude and hence micro climate than Hobart and also has a population of, wait for it, 3.74 million.
    But oh yes it and Hobart a quite similar?
    I would like to think Tania’s comment might be out of context or said in jest, but if not, that a Hobart resident has never visited the mountain and would only see fit to do so if there were shops there exposes her to be vacuous in the extreme.
    What that says about us who elect them is very cringe worthy.

  41. john Hayward

    November 13, 2013 at 11:02 am

    Tas Inc was quick to grasp its vision of the light on the hill – flashing neon advertising the gaming rooms cum bar and bistro.

    John Hayward

  42. Steve

    November 13, 2013 at 9:32 am

    Of course, why would you bother having a management trust when it’s obvious that the Upper House can do the job so much better?

  43. Pete Godfrey

    November 13, 2013 at 9:22 am

    Fantastic idea, desecrate such a beautiful mountain so that people who have nothing useful to do can go up there to placate their ancient instinct for hunting and gathering by shopping.
    What a fantastic vision, we are so lucky that past visionaries allowed that stupid microwave tower up there, now people will be able to go up there to fry their genes while shopping.

  44. pat synge

    November 13, 2013 at 8:56 am

    Well said, Tanya.
    We need a shopping mall at the summit.
    Otherwise why would anyone bother going there?

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