Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Arts

Reduced to a number on a map …

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Carbon Stack, Marcus Tatton

Church Studio Franklin has a new exhibition opening on Saturday the 28th January. For those of you wishing to know how to find us, just look for the sculpture in front of the Church. Marcus Tatton has installed Carbon Stack to celebrate, Artists behind the Action, a collection of images from photographers and printmakers primarily who have donated work to the show for the benefit of the Huon Valley Environmental Centre.

For Artists Behind The Action, the photographers were chosen for their commitment to conservation, and their undoubted expertise and creativity. Some of the images are well known, such as the photograph of the Weld Angel by Matt Newton …

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… which has become an icon in the conservation movement.

Bob Brown’s has a photograph that he took on the Franklin River, and it is significant not only for the beauty of the scene but as a reminder of how actions can lead to great successes. It is hard to imagine the Franklin any other way now, and hard to imagine green politics without Bob Brown.

But the exhibition is more than a few iconic images, it is a demonstration of how much support there is by artists for the landscape, and for the recognition that landscapes are not there just to be painted or pixellated, but there to be kept in perpetuity for the generations to come. Landscapes in Southern Tasmania formed in their complexity over millions of years are still being reduced to a number on a map to disappear on a due date for no profit and no joy.

It is perhaps not widely appreciated how significant artists are in supporting the HVEC. Fundraising though arts events, and donations of works of art, form the largest proportion of funds for an organisation that has difficulty finding corporate sponsorship and support from granting bodies. It is a truism that the arts can be useful and practical in the survival of conservation movements.

This title, Artists Behind the Action, is also about artists being right behind the ideological and ecological positions that HVEC hold. Whilst the photographers have a more direct connection with these positions given the nature of their work, there are many printmakers whose imagery is less direct but nonetheless deeply connected to the issues. The inks, the paper, the sources of inspiration, are all interconnected in the working life of printmakers.

Milan Milojevic, is a reknowned printmaker, and has been head of printmaking at the School of Art in Hobart. Milan and other printmakers have work on the walls, but also in a box set of limited edition prints and photographs. There are ten artists, with ten prints, in editions of ten that represent ten years of the Huon Valley Environmental Centre.

Those in this show are all practicing artists and bring with them their own styles, techniques, histories and beliefs. There is no one unifying style to this exhibition – which of course includes the installation by Marcus Tatton in front of the church, but what does unite all of them, is the belief in the work of the HVEC and their desire to see the work of protecting the forests continue.

Come and see this fascinating collection of images at Church Studio Franklin, with a great range of images that are part of this not for profit, fundraising show.
Open 11am – 5 pm. Saturday 28 th January – Sunday 2 March, 3408 Huon Highway

Tasmanian environment group celebrates ten years of forest defence
• The events are also listed in TT’s What’s On listings: HERE

• Jenny Webber: Tasmanian Forest Protests commence Prime Ministers promised conservation areas

Today in two locations in Tasmania, forest conservationists have commenced protests in high conservation value forests that were left out from the conservation agreement. In Southern and North West Tasmania, activists have set up two protests where logging machinery has been tied to tree-sits. Members of Code Green and Huon Valley Environment Centre are conducting peaceful occupations of the threatened forests to protest about the ongoing devastation of globally unique forests. Both forests have been targeted by Forestry Tasmania to feed Ta Ann’s wood supply.

‘Last week, the State and Federal Government gave the go ahead to log in part of the 430,000ha area that was supposed to be under moratorium. The Prime Minister promised these old growth and high conservation value (HCV) areas should be protected but because of pressure from Ta Ann and Forestry Tasmania, these forests will be lost,’ Huon Valley Environment Centre’s spokeswoman Jenny Weber said.

‘The forests we are protesting in today are key targets for Ta Ann’s wood supply. Ta Ann is misleading Japanese customers and the public by peddling misinformation that they receive timber from regrowth and plantation areas in Tasmania only. The Southern protest in the Picton Valley forest is within 2km of a cave system that has indigenous and environmental values of international significance. These forests have never been logged before and conservationists have identified celery top pines that were 150 years old that have been felled,’ Jenny Weber said.

‘The conservation agreement signed on the 13th of January by the State and Federal governments does absolutely nothing to protect Tasmania’s globally unique forests including areas such as these in the North West of the state. It is still business as usual in the forests, with old growth and high conservation value forests tracts still being lost despite being promised protection by the Federal Government in August last year.’ Said spokesperson for Code Green Jared Irwin. ‘Code Green are committed to ongoing action until Tasmania’s irreplaceable wild forests receive true protection.’

‘It is completely unacceptable that Forestry Tasmania claims it needs to log within the 430,000ha, when they are leaving logs to rot. To find stock piles of logs is really disappointing, while logging continues in Devil Facial Tumor Disease free area,’ Jared Irwin said.

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• Tasmanian Forest Protests commence in Prime Minister’s promised conservation areas

Today in two locations in Tasmania, forest conservationists have commenced protests in high conservation value forests that were left out from the conservation agreement. In Southern and North West Tasmania, activists have set up two protests where logging machinery has been tied to tree-sits. Members of Code Green and Huon Valley Environment Centre are conducting peaceful occupations of the threatened forests to protest about the ongoing devastation of globally unique forests. Both forests have been targeted by Forestry Tasmania to feed Ta Ann’s wood supply.

Currently police are removing one protester from the tree sit in the north of the state. Mean while in the Picton Valley protesters on the ground have been asked leave the area.

‘Last week, the State and Federal Government gave the go ahead to log in part of the 430,000ha area that was supposed to be under moratorium. The Prime Minister promised these old growth and high conservation value (HCV) areas should be protected but because of pressure from Ta Ann and Forestry Tasmania, these forests will be lost,’ Huon Valley Environment Centre’s spokeswoman Jenny Weber said.

‘The forests we are protesting in today are key targets for Ta Ann’s wood supply. Ta Ann is misleading Japanese customers and the public by peddling misinformation that they receive timber from regrowth and plantation areas in Tasmania only. The Southern protest in the Picton Valley forest is within 2km of a cave system that has indigenous and environmental values of international significance. These forests have never been logged before and conservationists have identified celery top pines that were 150 years old that have been felled,’ Jenny Weber said.

‘The conservation agreement signed on the 13th of January by the State and Federal governments does absolutely nothing to protect Tasmania’s globally unique forests including areas such as these in the North West of the state. It is still business as usual in the forests, with old growth and high conservation value forests tracts still being lost despite being promised protection by the Federal Government in August last year.’ Said spokesperson for Code Green Jared Irwin. ‘Code Green are committed to ongoing action until Tasmania’s irreplaceable wild forests receive true protection.’

‘It is completely unacceptable that Forestry Tasmania claims it needs to log within the 430,000ha, when they are leaving logs to rot. To find stock piles of logs is really disappointing, while logging continues in Devil Facial Tumor Disease free area,’ Jared Irwin said.

— Jenny Weber, Huon Valley Environment Centre. Jared Irwin, Code Green

• Thursday: Tasmanian Forest Activist Released from Remand

A Tasmanian Forest Activst who was arrested yesterday in the Picton Valley, has appeared in court this morning after spending the night in remand. Tyrone Gibb was released on bail to appear in court on February 20th.

Gibb, was a member of a group of conservationists who participated in a peaceful protest at the Picton Valley yesterday.

‘Huon Valley Environment Centre mobilised conservationists to disrupt the logging of old growth forests in the Picton Valley yesterday. These forests are being logged for the Malaysian logging company Ta Ann.

Despite Ta Ann’s claims they support the protection of high conservation value forests and do not use old growth trees, the reality is that this Picton Valley forest with ancient rainforest species and old growth eucalyptus, is a key target by Forestry Tasmania for Ta Ann.

Furthermore this logging area that is in close proximity to a globally significant cave system with indigenous heritage located in threatened forests, has been left out of the failed conservation agreement to provide logs to Ta Ann,’ Jenny Weber, spokesperson for Huon Valley Environment Centre stated.

10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Andrew Bent

    January 24, 2012 at 4:32 pm

    OK, it’s indirectly related only. But I note that pics like Matt Newton’s award-winning Weld Angel pic you have published cannot be entered in this year’s Tasmanian Media Awards … because there is no category for online publication of photography.

    In fact no photographs published online are eligible. Get with it guys. This is the 21st century; not the 19th.

    Ed: It is worth noting that Newton’s Weld Angel image won the award for Best News Photography after being published in the Merc … approximately three months after first being published on TT.

  2. bob palendrome

    January 24, 2012 at 5:34 pm

    Hmmm. Doesn’t look like old growth to me.

    Go and do something useful with your time like volunteer to a community group or join the local fire brigade.

    You guys that are protesting are being used as pawns by the ENGO’s. It has become an industry of protest with no end point.

  3. Th

    January 24, 2012 at 5:38 pm

    Gee looks like virgin untouched regrowth to me ??

    I dont see much large wood there .

    But we would not want to confuse facts and a good story .

    Based on this example my 5 year old plantation will seen qualify for HCV.

  4. Shane Johnson

    January 25, 2012 at 12:08 am

    I love the sculpture at the front of the Church.
    Looking forward to seeing the exhibition.

  5. Johnboy

    January 25, 2012 at 3:11 am

    You guys are embarrising yourselves with a lack of basic forestry.Next week you’ll be in front of a plantation coupe claiming HCV.You’re a joke!! and so is TT for publishing such crap, losing what little credibility you had rapidly.Shape up or ship out TT.

  6. Rod

    January 26, 2012 at 1:50 pm

    If #3 can’t see much large wood in that photo perhaps he might explain why they bother to clearfell all those sticks. And I agree with #6 that it does show an embarrassing lack of basic forestry by cutting those sticks down.

  7. Frank Strie, TWFF President

    January 27, 2012 at 4:47 pm

    But then there are alternative examples to this ongoing war like situation in Tasmania.
    But you may know what that means?
    Real change, not secret deals amongst an elite.

    Getting to Consensus:
    How Organizations Collaborate to Solve Forestry Problems

    Why collaborate?
    A collaborative approach is often deployed
    as a rational response to a crisis in forest
    management and constitutes an acceptance
    that, under current arrangements, sustainable
    forest management is unworkable. Particularly in
    the case of large, public forest resources, where
    disaffection or conflict between government
    forest services and local communities has
    become the norm, collaboration is seen as a way
    out of stalemate. In these circumstances, the
    rationale for governments to collaborate can be
    to address the social injustices that undermine
    sustainable forest management.
    Governments also collaborate in order to tap
    into the strengths of other partners, to share
    the responsibilities of forest management and
    to reduce costs. Communities living nearby have
    intimate knowledge of the forest, are able to
    monitor and police access, and respond rapidly
    to threats such as wildfires. NGOs can be skilled
    providers of social science expertise, such as
    training, facilitation and social surveys. The
    private sector brings investment and links to
    markets. By renegotiating responsibilities for
    forest management, forest services often hope
    to reduce staffing levels, share the responsibility for protection with communities and concentrate on strategic planning, consensus building, regulation, monitoring and compliance.

    In the United States, the Forest Service summarises this with the slogan ‘partnerships for strong communities and healthy ecosystems’.
    Key topic: ‘collaborative forest management’
    Source:
    http://www.rightsandresources.org/documents/files/doc_141.pdf

    AND the next opportunity to learn about ‘collaborative forest management’:
    2012 Annual Winter Meeting
    Wildland Fire Training & Conference Center
    McClellan (Sacramento), CA
    January 28, 2012
    Getting to Consensus:
    How Organizations Collaborate to Solve Forestry Problems
    Why are some collaborative forest management efforts more successful than others? How is success measured? Are groups more effective dealing with public or private lands? Does regional, State or local scale make a difference?
    The 2012 winter meeting of the Northern California Society of American Foresters will focus on several case studies at different scales. Speakers will take a candid perspective on important questions, such as secrets to success, benefits, challenges and pit-falls, efficient use of time, long-term commitments, funding, impasses and end-runs, and dealing with large bureaucracies. …
    http://norcalsaf.org/temparticles/Winter_2012_meeting_flyer.pdf

  8. pat synge

    January 28, 2012 at 9:39 am

    Re 3&4.
    I have no idea why this specific area of forest is considered “of high conservation value” but it’s important to recognise that even young regrowth forest can be valuable if it links otherwise isolated older forest areas and so creates a wildlife corridor.
    The simplistic notion that the only forest worth protecting is old growth is simply that – simplistic.
    First regeneration regrowth is still a mixed forest and will mature as such if not logged but after each clearfell it will regenerate with a higher and higher proportion of eucalypts.

  9. pat synge

    January 28, 2012 at 12:06 pm

    That should have been Re 2&3 not 3&4

  10. Barnaby Drake

    January 28, 2012 at 6:24 pm

    # 2.3.6.7. The photographs in this article are what is left after they have removed all the sawlog quality wood. This is just the trash heap. Possibly 75% plus of the coupe.

    Forestry claim that it takes ninety years to regenerate a forest, so why are they cutting all the young trees and setting the process back 20 – 40 years? They haven’t even got a chip mill to send this lot to, so it will probably just rot on the ground. They are just too damned lazy to do a proper forestry job and ALWAYS take the easy way out. Clearfell the lot and never consider selective logging. And they claim they act sustainably! Porcine aeronautics will appear long before Forestry learns how to do the job properly.

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