Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Economy

Misguided amalgamations

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Alderman Philip Cocker today expressed his disappointment that the CEO of TASCOSS Tony Reidy had joined the media spin of the Property Council.

“It is somewhat bemusing that the CEO of TASCOSS who represents the disadvantaged has signed on to the amalgamations campaign being driven by the big end of town based on dubious polling and false economics.

I would urge Mr Reidy to examine more closely the motivations of the Property Council and the research evidence that suggests that costs may rise for many ratepayers as a result of amalgamations.

The continuing line by the Property Council that there are massive savings to be had can be shown to be false wherever you look at amalgamations that have occurred previously in Australia and overseas.

On the 29th of September the Examiner newspaper quoted Mary Massina from the property council who said “she agreed that interstate research did not show that other states had made substantial cost savings from amalgamation”.

I ask Mr Reidy on what factual evidence did he sign on to this campaign and what research he conducted for himself before joining his organisation to the Property Council’s campaign?

Mr Reidy is running the risk of doing the people he represents a major disservice by perpetuating the myth that council amalgamations will produce significantly lower costs for people.

“It is false and can be proven to be false.

“I urge him to reconsider and I would be happy to provide him with proper research on these matters.

Earlier today on TT, Mary Massina: Cost of living a major driver for local government reform

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. russell

    December 1, 2011 at 6:54 pm

    Waiting for Ms Massina to start with the frenzied ‘jobs’jobs’jobs’. It has worked on the pollies for the other corporates. When bereft of rationale, resort to the breathless ‘jobs’jobs’jobs’. Especially when you don’t want people talking about ‘profits,profits,profits’.

    Tis exceedingly strange for Tascoss to be on this particular 1%er bandwagon. What would Tascoss make of the attitudes and values of the major property group committee member organizations? What is their core vision? What is in it for non property owner poor people? Don’t major restructures end up costing people more? Enhanced profits have to come from somewhere.

    The envisaged process could be the excuse for council and private rate and rental rises. This will not diminish cost of living imposts for ordinary people at all. It may rationalize rates of scale for property group members and therefore scales of profits. What else are they in it for? Don’t tell me they’re in it because they have a concern to diminish costs of living for the struggling masses. Pull the other one.

    The property group members would have already done their forward estimates on this proposal, to determine how much better off they will be under the new regime. A challenge Ms Massina, release those ‘top secret’ numbers for us and particularly for Tascoss to have a look at. How much better off, profit wise, would property group members be under their proposed changed arrangements? Where would this money come from?

  2. phill Parsons

    December 1, 2011 at 6:04 pm

    You are missing the point. The whole local government sector should be subsumed into a single state tier with an expanded unicamarel parliament to legislate and a professional public service to implement same. 15 members per electorate gives a chance for local identities not politically affiliated but popular to be elected.

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