Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Books

Flanagan wins 2011 Tasmania Book Prize

Premier and Minister for the Arts, Lara Giddings MP, today presented local author Richard Flanagan with the top award at the prestigious Tasmania Book Prizes ceremony at the Hobart Town Hall.

The biennial suite of prizes, collectively worth $35 000, recognise significant achievement across three categories: best book with Tasmanian content in any genre, best book by a Tasmanian writer and best book by a Tasmanian publisher.

The prizes are presented as part of the Ten Days on the Island program.

“Given the incredibly high calibre of the 69 titles submitted for consideration, the judges’ decision was a very difficult one,” Ms Giddings said.

“Inspired by historical events and set in the wilds of nineteenth-century Tasmania, Richard Flanagan’s Wanting is a powerful, evocative and profoundly moving novel examining the themes of art, love and the desire for human connection.

“It gives me great pleasure to present him the $25 000 Tasmania Book Prize for best book with Tasmanian content in any genre.”

Ms Giddings said the Margaret Scott Prize, for the best book by a Tasmanian writer, worth $5 000, was won by Kathryn Lomer for her young adult fiction work What Now, Tilda B?

“The novel explores teenager Tilda B’s journey of self-discovery as she looks outside of herself to discover where her heart really belongs,” Ms Giddings said.

“It is a novel about passion and following your dreams, even if you don’t know what they are yet.”

The University of Tasmania Prize, for best book by a Tasmanian publisher, worth $5 000, was won by independent publisher Pardolote Press for Postcards from the Asylum by Karen Knight.

“The Tasmanian literary sector makes such a significant contribution to our cultural lives, not only here in Tasmania, but nationally and internationally as well,” Ms Giddings said.

“To be able to honour our writers and publishers, who absolutely deserve this recognition for their work, is an honour in itself.”

16 Comments

16 Comments

  1. Brenton

    April 2, 2011 at 9:59 pm

    Congratualtions Richard Flanagan, a great Tasmanian and Australian writer!

  2. dan

    April 2, 2011 at 11:11 pm

    Well deserved Richard. Lets hope your insight into addressing other Tasmanian issues is as well recognised.

  3. Veronica Foale

    April 3, 2011 at 12:23 am

    Congratulations and very much deserved!

  4. Anne Layton-Bennett

    April 3, 2011 at 1:33 am

    Well done Richard, and many congratulations.

  5. Karl Stevens

    April 3, 2011 at 1:54 am

    Some of the congratulations must go to Lara Giddings for choking back the rage for long enough to present Richard with his prize. Fairy godfather Paul is not happy!

  6. Valleywatcher

    April 3, 2011 at 1:55 am

    Congratulations, Richard! I’m going to read this book next. Can’t wait.

  7. George Harris aka woodworker

    April 3, 2011 at 12:25 pm

    I started reading one of his books once, long before he came to prominence with his rants about the timber industry, and his criticism of Jim Bacon within days of his death. The book was given to me, which is better than me having bought it, because I didn’t like the writing style and its tortured presumptuousness, and I discarded it.
    I have come to like the guy even less since then, and there is less chance than ever that I will read any of his books, let alone buy one.
    I try to avoid his articles, I find them outrageous, with too many elements of fiction throughout. Sometimes I feel as though I should respond to some of that crap, but really, I have better things to do.

  8. Ookpik

    April 3, 2011 at 1:19 pm

    Perhaps you should try again to read one of Richard Flanagn’s books – you might see the scales drop from your eyes, mate if you keep an open enough mind (on second thoughts – that ain’t gunna happen, is it?)

  9. Jack Nimble

    April 3, 2011 at 1:37 pm

    Yeh George, I feel the same way with the load of spin we hear from Gunns and FT, I know what i prefer to read, Richard Flanagan any day.

  10. someone's mum

    April 3, 2011 at 2:02 pm

    Oh, lets play the man then Mr Harris. Wanting is a very accessible book. I read it over a weekend and my husband read it in less than one day. I presume the book you are referring to is Death of a River Guide, which perhaps would have been revealing to you if you had bothered to wade a bit further in to it.

    Could I suggest that the type of bigoted post as the one to which I am responding does nothing for your cause? And as much as I might want to agree and sympathise with some of your insights re the Tasmanian forests..I choke on your hatred as it is written. With every little bit you write you alienate me the more-so and I have even come to feel that you do a ‘crappy’ job of speaking for those you choose to represent.

    Congrats to Richard. And thank you.

  11. Margaretta Pos

    April 3, 2011 at 3:34 pm

    Re #6: Lara choking back her rage? Not so! She made a good speech, gave Richard his prize and he kissed her. Richard spoke about the need for civility in Tasmania in his speech – already prepared -and thanked her for her grace. Afterwards, she came up to him and they hugged each other and then there were kisses all round.

  12. Margaretta Pos

    April 3, 2011 at 5:22 pm

    Congratulations to Richard for winning the $25,000 Tasmania Book Prize; to Kathryn Lomer for winning the $5000 Margaret Scott Prize for the best book by a Tasmanian writer; and Pardalote Press for winning the $5000 UTAS prize for the best book by a Tasmanian publisher (Karen Knight’s ‘Postcards from the Asylum’ with photos by Sam Rosewarne). And congratulations to Robert Dessaix for being the star speaker at the Literary Festival.

  13. Luca Vanzino

    April 4, 2011 at 3:01 am

    Re Woody @ # 7

    “Sometimes I feel as though I should respond to some of that crap, but really, I have better things to do.”

    Mate…you just did!

  14. George Harris aka woodworker

    April 4, 2011 at 1:01 pm

    Actually, Luca, (#13), I meant responding directly to those articles in the publications in which they appear, such as in The Monthly, which carried the article that won the writer of fiction the 2008 John Curtain award for Journalism in Victoria in 2008.
    You might like to read the article on this in the Daily Telegraph: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/opinion/truth-suffers-major-setback/story-e6frezz0-1111117383636 Not that I am a fan of Piers Akerman either, but he claimed Flanagan’s article on that occasion “rewards rhetoric and applauds lies.”
    As I said, I have better things to do

  15. Martin Cash

    April 4, 2011 at 2:10 pm

    Oh George, get with it … for god’s sake man … are you seriously dragging up Piers because of your irrational apparent hatred of all things Flanagan. Akers, in his inimitable style was regurgitating classic fiction:

    http://oldtt.pixelkey.biz/index.php/article/akerman-recycled

  16. George Harris aka woodworker

    April 5, 2011 at 2:23 am

    Re #15, I do not have an irrational apparent hatred of all things Flanagan, I just don’t like the guy, or his work.
    I have met him, and I have seen how he comes across on TV and I have read enough of his public pronouncements to not care much for his point of view.
    You seem as though you might have an irrational apparent hatred of all things Akerman, and as I have said, I don’t think much of that pompous old fool either, but I’m happy to throw him in if it rattles your cage, as I thought it would…

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