Tasmanian Times

David Obendorf

Foxes: Are they or aren’t they? (Part 1)

The debate over foxes in Tasmania has a long and colourful history.

Watch the Stateline video HERE

Transcript:

AIRLIE WARD, PRESENTER: Are they here or aren’t they?

Are foxes about to devastate the State’s wildlife and is the mere fear of them being introduced enough to see governments pour money into eradication?

Or are politicians and public servants just trying to give ailing departmental budgets a fox led cash injection?

Conspiracy theories abound on both sides of Tasmania’s great fox debate.

It’s a debate that’s actually being going on for a long time.

Fiona Breen has looked into the history of the elusive red fox.

FIONA BREEN, REPORTER: It could be the English countryside.

The hounds baying, the sound of the traditional hunting horn and the riders perfectly turned out in their red livery.

In the 1980s, a hunt was still a favourite past time for many country families in the northern and southern midlands.

A tradition going back 150 years in Tasmania, the quarry, an aniseed scent rather than a fox.

A collection of photographs housed at the archives office of Tasmania show one of the original hunt clubs meeting outside the popular Melton Mowbray Hotel.

Today southern midlands mayor, Tony Bisdee, is a descendent of one of those expatriate English hunting families.

TONY BISDEE, SOUTHERN MIDLANDS MAYOR: My great grandfather was master of the hunt for some considerable time and as were many members of the family were members of the hunt club.

FIONA BREEN: Stories about the hunts have been handed down through generations of Bisdees and he still calls family conversations about the popular pastime.

TONY BISDEE: From the relatives there would be probably up to 70 or 80 or even more, depending on the weather and that would gather of a Saturday or Sunday or even both and would start out on a hunt.

And they would probably go on the hunt for most of the day, and probably return about 4pm and where they would probably have what we call today a barbecue.

FIONA BREEN: An original sandstone horse trough and the hotel are reminders of a time when country Tasmania looked almost as English as the home country.

DAVID OBENDORF, WILDLIFE PATHOLOGIST: Hunting clubs go back to a history in Tasmania that probably began in the 1820s.

With colonial expansion of the valleys, north of Hobart, and south of Launceston, wealthy land owners, which were well connected to colonial government got into the things that they used to do very well in England.

FIONA BREEN: The baying of the hounds could often be heard in the countryside near Hobart and Launceston.

As men and women chased the quarry, sometimes a deer, a kangaroo or a possum and according to accounts in colonial newspapers, sometimes a fox.

TONY BISDEE: I’ve never heard any of the past generations speak about foxes and if there were foxes there then, they’d still be here today and they’re not.

Certainly not in this district that I’m aware of and if I think there had been a siting we would have all heard about it.

But I don’t ever believe that they brought out foxes in those days for the purpose of hunting.

FIONA BREEN: Wildlife veterinarian and pathologist David Obendorf is well known for questioning the evidence held up by the eradication team as proof of a fox population in Tasmania.

He’s gone through the archives.

DAVID OBENDORF: These foxes were attempted to be brought in using friendly captains that were transiting regularly between London and Tasmania.

FIONA BREEN: In one piece, the Hobart courier on the 18th of July 1846 reports:

“On Thursday the Cornwall hounds met near the township of Oatlands to run a bagged, Port Phillipian fox, which after a sharp run, was taken in Lake Dulverton.”

DAVID OBENDORF: So that’s the first instance. We have instances then through the 1860s, 1870s, there’s an allegation of importations using members of the military officers in the 1890s, this was one that is contentious, and then well into 1910, 1930, 1940, 1970 and potentially 1990.

FIONA BREEN: From single foxes brought by showmen to the more prominent case reported in the 1870s, when four foxes were imported on board the ship, The Ethel.

DAVID OBENDORF: They were thrown overboard because of the pressure that the captain was facing of being charged with importing an animal that was illegal, but one of them managed to swim ashore, disappeared up Kelly Steps into a drain.

FIONA BREEN: It was caught and given to the mysterious Tasmanian Acclimatisation Society, never to be seen again.

Despite intermittent reports of foxes ever since, Tasmania was considered fox free until the late 1990s.

That was until a story began circulating about three hunters who’d apparently brought three litters of fox club cubs into the state in a boot of a car on board the Spirit of Tasmania.

David Llewellyn, the then police and primary industries minister was so concerned he ordered a formal police inquiry into the allegations.

Widely circulated documents obtained under freedom of information show the secret police investigation found no evidence to corroborate the claims.

Former professional hunter Ian Rist knows those accused and says it’s just not true.

IAN RIST, RETIRED PROFESSIONAL HUNTER: There was an extensive police investigation and a very thorough police investigation involving some six detectives under commander Ivan Dean and Detective Inspector Michael Otley, including phone, everything was done, phone records, and they actually come up with no evidence at all to support or corroborate those allegations.

FIONA BREEN: The police briefed the Minister David Llewellyn in 2001 and yet the next year he was still talking about the allegations.

DAVID LLEWELLYN, FORMER MINISTER: We very clearly now have a number of hot spots around the states where someone has actually imported three sets of fox cubs and distributed them in various areas around the state.

FIONA BREEN: Even today, David Llewellyn believes fox cubs were brought into the state by hunters.

DAVID LLEWELLYN: National parks and wildlife advised me that they were absolutely certain that the information that they had was accurate, that some hunters had been to Victoria, or on the Mainland, hunting deer and they had bought three litters of fox cubs back to Tasmania, and then released them when they were juveniles.

One lot in and around Longford, another lot south of Oatlands and another lot on the east coast.

FIONA BREEN: He questions the thoroughness of the police investigation.

DAVID LLEWELLYN: Well, look, there was a whole lot of scepticism in the community about foxes and a lot of joking going on and people were treating it very, very, well not very seriously at all.

And I think the police could have done a better job, frankly.

IVAN DEAN, FMR COMMANDER, TASMANIA POLICE: These police are experienced investigators, we were told at a time by the Commissioner of Police that he required the best investigation it could be had in relation to this and that’s exactly what happened. It was a very good investigation.

FIONA BREEN: David Llewellyn says sightings of foxes in the areas where the cubs were thought to have been released authenticated the information.

That same year he secured $400,000 from the Commonwealth and the state committed $1.2 million for a fox taskforce.

Now after 10 years and tens of millions of dollars, whether the litters of fox cubs were brought into Tasmania or not, the question remains are there foxes out there and are they breeding?

Next week we will examine written the evidence gathered by the fox eradication team.

And look at what’s happening on the ground to hunt and eradicate the elusive pest.

Mercury Monday: Pincer attack on foxes

On Tasmanian Times:

Dr David Obendorf’s extensive articles on foxes: HERE

Dr Clive Marks’ forensic examination of the science: HERE

The unclaimed $5000 Fox Reward HERE

Author Credits: [show_post_categories parent="no" parentcategory="writers" show = "category" hyperlink="yes"]
25 Comments

25 Comments

  1. Ian Rist

    November 18, 2010 at 12:56 pm

    Question Authority try going along to one of their Community Engagement sessions if you want a real lesson in how to manipulate the truth……
    Or try the Fox Free Tasmania Lesson Plans for our school children, especially number 8.
    The Lesson Plans for our school children were launched in the Parliament by Minister Lyn Thorp on the 24th May 2004.
    http://www.parliament.tas.gov.au/HansardCouncil/isysquery/bd8e71e0-3fd2-488d-8e20-6cea123d4a0a/8/doc/
    If you would like a copy of the lesson plans and can,t Google them, I have them in PDF file.

  2. Question Authority

    November 17, 2010 at 6:33 pm

    I thought the 2 Longford foxes issue had been comprehensively debunked ages ago. Yet it is still published by a government authority, although the current document is dated 2002. Surely an update would be in order.

    Otherwise in who’s interest is it to promulgate out of date and incorrect information? That could be a mistake if it was an oversight and unlawful if allowed to occur, deliberately and knowingly. It could be an offence under the State Services Act. Not to mention a breach of statutory obligation, also under the Act and other enabling legislation. Penalties would apply. I wonder at what level of seniority the officers are, who are responsible and accountable for causing to be published inaccurate, false and misleading information? At least a please explain, preparatory to a possible charge under the Act would seem warranted.

    They forgot step one in the gassing of dens in that one must first find a den.

    Of far greater concern is the use of a lure fox. A female fox operated on and either caged or radio collared, currently being trialed in Victoria. Based on mention of this, it is not unreasonable to assume that there is already an intention to import live foxes into Tasmania. No fly by night abalone fisher but a government department! It would be a fair bet, that plans are already well underway for this. I wonder if the Tasmanian public will be informed before, of the intention, or after the fact, of foxes being imported?

    The $5000 reward is a great incentive and remains unclaimed, after all this time. I wonder if I shot a fox and when I walked up to it, I found it had a collar on, if I might still be eligible to claim the $5000 reward??

    As with the scats, the foxes will have to be imported into Tasmania, in order for them to be able to be found in Tasmania!

  3. Ian Rist

    November 17, 2010 at 1:45 pm

    They wonder why they have credibility problem with this litany of mistruths still on the net…

    http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/file.aspx?id=6536

    …The two Longford foxes?

  4. Ian Rist

    November 3, 2010 at 12:24 pm

    Well said Question Authority # 21.
    The scat/fox products import stuff up would have to be one of the most blatant examples I have seen in this whole sorry saga.

    The FOI in my possession clearly shows only one import permit/special authority for importation of fox products was issued on the 21st February 2005 and expired six months later on the 31 July 2005.
    This permit was issued under section 19 of the Animal Health Act.
    We are now being told section 17 applies – not section 19.
    Why then was the original 2005 permit issued under section 19?

    I say again Section 17 does not apply …it is irrelevant.
    In section 1 of the Tasmanian Animal Health Act 1995: Preliminary. (3) interpretation, part (d ) it clearly defines in (d ) that faeces and urine are animal products.
    Animals or animals products must be brought in under special Authority permit section 19.
    Not section 17.
    Here is Section 17. Where does section 17 say fox scats/animal products are exempt????
    ANIMAL HEALTH ACT 1995 – PART 4 SECTION 17
    – Importation Division 1 – Importation of animals, restricted materials and infected animal materials 17. Prohibition on importation of animals, restricted materials and infected animal materials
    (1) A person must not import an animal or a restricted material except where that importation –

    (a) is authorised by a general or special authority; and

    (b) is done in accordance with any conditions specified in the general or special authority.

    Penalty:

    Fine not exceeding 100 penalty units or a term of imprisonment not exceeding 12 months, or both.
    (2) Notwithstanding that a general or special authority authorises the importation of an animal or a restricted material, a person must not import that animal or restricted material if –

    (a) the person believes or has reason to believe that the animal or restricted material is infected with a List A disease, List B disease, new disease or unknown disease; and

    (b) that general or special authority does not specifically authorise the importation of an animal or a restricted material that is so infected.

    Very, very strange…now check Part 4 Section 19.
    http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/tas/consol_act/aha1995113/

  5. Question Authority

    November 3, 2010 at 2:07 am

    Re #29 Ian, you highlight an interesting thing. It relates to statutory authority; the office that it is ‘invested’ in, position number, (requirements of incumbents), placement in staffing structure, responsibility/reporting arrangements, power of delegation invested in the office, whether the authority has been delegated, full or part delegation, whether “re-delegated” and so on? This ‘mapping’ of statutory (and delegated) instruments of authority (with obligation) arrangement is important for the community to be assured is, being adhered to and supervised appropriately, lawfully. Customs and Border Protection type services are critical. (These are the positions carrying delegated responsibility and running the detail of our state.)
    I think you would be aware of for example, what office/position delegations holding authority, reporting and responsibility arrangements, for your expertise and interest in the fox caper, including across departments and agencies? The situation described in your last sentence would certainly have code of conduct and/or legal ramifications if some circumstance were/was to go awry. Whether all relevant delegations are actually signed (with the appropriate detail), witnesses, authorized by the senior officer, dated (correctly), all requirements correct, duly certified and fulfilled, at the time of import of fox ‘bits & pieces’, for example?
    Each dept/authority should hold this ‘map’ for their portfolio areas and the OSSC should have a ‘map’ for all depts, authorities, GBEs etc; theoretically. If not, I wonder who does?
    Apols for clumsy longwindedness! Good luck with your continued work, we can’t keep on like this forever. I wonder if we’ll ever get a “surprise, surprise, guess what’s turned up??”
    Poison the WHOLE island, I’ll bet they don’t advertise that to our visitors? Cheers now

  6. Ian Rist

    November 2, 2010 at 5:39 pm

    I hear on my extremely reliable “grape vine” that the FEP are extremely displeased over the recent Stateline fox programs.
    Deary deary me… a bit of reporting of the truth and they are not happy.
    To open debate one of their many TT readers might like to explain exactly what they were extremely displeased about.
    Could it be the fact that they have been importing fox products without a permit?
    Could it be the way it was childishly explained that THEY don’t need a permit?
    Could it be the CVO has used section 17 (which does not apply) instead of section 19 (all special authority applies to section 19) to attempt to get them off the hook?

  7. Ian Rist

    October 30, 2010 at 4:54 pm

    A bit late now…
    http://www.dpiw.tas.gov.au/inter/nsf/WebPages/LJEM-8AM43V?open
    to see if fox baits are having any effect on Devils.
    Submissions close 11 November 2010.

  8. Ian Rist

    October 28, 2010 at 7:27 pm

    This is seven managers in about as many years….must just get too hot in the kitchen!

  9. Ian Rist

    October 28, 2010 at 3:27 pm

    Hope they have more success with a new FEP- FFTF Manager than they have had with the foxes.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/10/29/3051622.htm

  10. Ian Rist

    October 13, 2010 at 1:09 pm

    In # 15 I note the factual Christian names of previous managers and members of the FFTF or FEP or what ever they are calling themselves at the moment were disallowed.
    I find this to be extraordinary moderating…for years I have been named in full, suffered abuse, false accusations, letters written to newspapers making false claims, personal insults on this very site by people that don’t even have the intestinal fortitude to use their own names and yet when I attempt to list a factual list of the names of people that have been responsible for and have participated in this shambles (to illustrate the fragility of the whole scenario) it is disallowed.
    Why? Are there different sets of rules for different people?

  11. Ian Rist

    October 12, 2010 at 9:57 pm

    Someone should pen an article on the changing guard of fox operations in Tasmania and call it the Passing Parade.
    It seems all the main players with all the “real” evidence have passed on into obscurity.
    The once loud voices bombarding a gullible and sensation seeking media seem to have just faded away with barely a whimper.
    In some sort of order from 2000 on we had … the list goes on.
    Ministers have come and gone, all complicit and duplicit with the ‘informed and so sure of the evidence’ Public servants.
    The ones displaying the best longevity appear to be the bureaucrats that have also benefited very well from this taxpayer funded largesse.
    They seem to be still in some sort order, I guess when the deck chairs are reshuffled at the coal face they remain as dark sinister shadows lurking in the background and escaping public scrutiny.

  12. David Obendorf

    October 12, 2010 at 9:34 pm

    The biological red foxes present in Tasmania are proving to be as wily and secretive and elusive as the political ‘foxes’.

    In March 2003 a wildlife consultant reviewing the Tasmanian fox program told the State government that if it’s gathered fox evidence was solid then ‘the prevailing situation indicates foxes are present at a number of sites’. He recommended ‘the time frame for eradication be set at three years…’.

    ‘The eradication project should be seen as an exercise in crisis management…the eradication of the fox from Tasmania should be assigned the highest priority on both the Commonwealth and State government conservation agendas’.

    It’s now 2010 FOUR years after Dr Kinnear’s eradication time frame expired.

    Is Tasmania any closer to “eradicating” foxes from the island State?

  13. Ian Rist

    October 12, 2010 at 12:01 pm

    Llewellyn’s chickens are coming home to roost.
    Ah yes Mr Llewellyn you were told by the NPWS that there was an allegation of fox cub import and release… idle gossip and innuendo spoken over the back of a utility outside Allgoods.
    That was, however, before six Tasmania Police detectives investigated and came up with absolutely no evidence to corroborate that allegation:
    FIONA BREEN: The police briefed the Minister David Llewellyn in 2001 and yet the next year he was still talking about the allegations.
    DAVID LLEWELLYN, FORMER MINISTER: We very clearly now have a number of hot spots around the states where someone has actually imported three sets of fox cubs and distributed them in various areas around the state.
    FIONA BREEN: Even today, David Llewellyn believes fox cubs were brought into the state by hunters.
    DAVID LLEWELLYN: National parks and wildlife advised me that they were absolutely certain that the information that they had was accurate, that some hunters had been to Victoria, or on the Mainland, hunting deer and they had bought three litters of fox cubs back to Tasmania, and then released them when they were juveniles.
    One lot in and around Longford, another lot south of Oatlands and another lot on the east coast.
    FIONA BREEN: He questions the thoroughness of the police investigation.
    DAVID LLEWELLYN: Well, look, there was a whole lot of scepticism in the community about foxes and a lot of joking going on and people were treating it very, very, well not very seriously at all.
    And I think the police could have done a better job, frankly.
    IVAN DEAN, FMR COMMANDER, TASMANIA POLICE: These police are experienced investigators, we were told at a time by the Commissioner of Police that he required the best investigation it could be had in relation to this and that’s exactly what happened. It was a very good investigation.
    End Stateline quotes.

    It is my understanding that the present minister has admitted in writen correspondence that he considers now the allegation of fox cub import/release have no substance.
    Very unusual animal this Tasmanian fox (Vulpes tasmanicus lewy) leaves no footprints, no telltale hair under barbed wire fences, craps only once in it’s lifetime, has the amazing ability to turn invisible after crossing roads, but becomes highly visible just before budget time each year.
    Cannot be shot, trapped, poisoned or even photographed.
    Does not breed in dens, is mute at breeding time, can travel up to 250 km in one day when required, and will go down in the Guinness book of records as the finest fiscal fox in history.

  14. Ian Rist

    October 10, 2010 at 3:27 pm

    Never has anyone been closer to the truth than Airlie Ward in her opening narration on Stateline;

    Or are politicians and public servants just trying to give ailing departmental budgets a fox led cash injection?

  15. David

    October 10, 2010 at 1:42 pm

    As Mr Rist highlights there are numerous theories and assumptions about the origins of foxes in Tasmania.

    The difficulty & confusion in Tasmania – not just with this issue either – is the entrenched culture of fear and intimidation that prevents ordinary Tasmania’s from coming forward and making an affidavit or witness statement detailing their allegation or claim, signing it and having it witnessed by a Justice of the Peace, a Commission for Affidavits or a Tasmanian policeman.

    The research now being done will cast some light on how Tasmania’s metaphorical “love affair” with foxes came about; who was the lusty lover and who were seduced by his charm and guile.

    The “Pincer” strategy to eradicate foxes from Tasmania reminds me of Governor George Arthur’s failed and expensive 1820’s “Black Line” to round up & corral the Tasmanian aboringinal people onto Tasman peninsula. Deluded and opportunistic as Governor Arthur was, he had declared war on his ‘enemy’ that he knew existed; his strategy failed and the “Robertson – Plan B” commenced.

    But the current fox strategy might just work because no one knows where the foxes are and the strategy is based on so many untested assumptions. A major assumption is that our Tasmanian foxes will take the buried 1080 baits in the face of other available food is just that – an ASSUMPTION.

    It is particularly easy to eradicate an organism from a location where you believe it exists but have no corroborated proof of its continued presence.

    In the case of the Tasmanian fox population, one day DPIWE declares the unwanted organism is there and a threat; a decade or so later DPIPWE it is within its power alone to declare that it has been successfully eradicated.

    Now that’s cute. It’s not science, more like a religion.

  16. Jon Sumby

    October 9, 2010 at 2:57 pm

    @9, Ian Rist, sorry I can’t help. As I said this was just a chat over coffee at a conference a decade ago, I don’t remember the name.

  17. Ian Rist

    October 9, 2010 at 11:11 am

    I think Jon Sumby would be doing everyone a favour by naming this person responsible for the “abalone fisherman rumor”.
    If this rumor was circulated amongst vertebrate reseach people as claimed then I am sure the person who was head of this dept. in Victoria in the 90’s would have heard it.
    This person I am referring to is beyond question, his integrity, honesty and sincerity is and always has been A1 and 10/10.
    I will be speaking to this person today.

  18. Ian Rist

    October 8, 2010 at 11:54 pm

    There were a lot of stories floating about from the mid 1990’s onwards. I know at the height of the Game Farms problems with feral cats i.e. 1998 – 2000 I heard different rumours of foxes being brought in, Jon S’s story was one, revenge for Gun laws was another and my thoughts were ” hell, that’s all I bloody need,something else to munch up my pheasants and partridges, not to mention all the the hard work I had put into rebuilding the local Brown quail population.
    My inquiries led me believe whether true or not these rumours ALL were being promulgated by the N.P.W.S. and persons that later became part of the DPIWE.
    I have some very firm thoughts on all of this and I believe they were best put into words in Airlie Ward’s opening narration on Stateline 8/10/2010.
    Regardless of how many foxes were brought in after the 1820’s they never established or they would be everywhere by now. The “fox evidence” is just not backed up by actual foxes.

  19. Jon Sumby

    October 8, 2010 at 5:54 pm

    This is a question for both David Obendorf and Ian Rist. I take no sides but am curious. Back in the late 90s I knew some of the people working with the Vic. Vertebrate Pest Control program and they in turn were linked to the Tassie mob.

    My question is about the following. I do not know if it has been mentioned before or been debunked, but I’d like to know the current status of this story.

    The story doing the rounds of the vertebrate pest control scientists at the time was that a certain notorious Victorian abalone poacher, who had been chased many times across Bass Strait and eventually had their million dollar boat confiscated. This person swore revenge against the Tassie DPIWE.

    He allegedly got a female and litter from near Eden (NSW), and put them ashore in the NE of the state. This excercise was allegedly repeated in the central NW coast. The story never mentioned ‘hunters’ or the ferry; just a disgruntled Victorian abalone poacher exacting revenge against Tasmania.

    That was the story doing the rounds of the scientists involved with fox control at the time.

    So, David and Ian, is this story bollocks? The only place I’ve heard this story is from vertebrate pest control boffins over coffee at a conference, but I admit I haven’t followed this issue closely, so it may have surfaced elsewhere.

    The thing that interests me is this was the internal story but the public story seems to be about an import by Tassie hunters.

    Does this scuttlebutt still have legs or is it ‘busted’?

  20. Dr Kevin Bonham

    October 8, 2010 at 5:06 pm

    #5 is just inconsistent. In the early paragraphs William casts aspersions against the quality of evidence for the presence of foxes but in the third paragraph he asserts as fact that “plenty” of quolls and “other carnivorous critters” (which others are not specified) have succumbed to fox baits. However he provides not a shred of evidence that it is so. Not even one carcass!

    One thing that was interesting to see through the Stateline report is that Dr Obendorf apparently holds a similar view to Nick Mooney, ie that there is a fair amount of evidence to suggest that foxes had been being brought into the state intermittently for some time prior to the Burnie escape and the early 2000s sightings. It seems this is something that all sides of the debate should accept as probable fact. It is important because it provides a way in which foxes could have been present in small numbers in the early 2000s without needing to resort to the bioterrorism importation theory advanced by Llewellyn, for which the police found no reliable evidence. This is something I have been saying frequently, whenever the police dismissal of that importation theory is incorrectly considered to be a knockdown argument against there having been several foxes in the wild in the early 2000s.

    Of course this doesn’t alone resolve the question of whether foxes are widespread and breeding now.

  21. William Boeder

    October 8, 2010 at 12:43 pm

    The fox motley rolls on in the minds of a few highly optimistic FEP individuals whom by now would have forgotten the shape and form of a Fox unless they have their minds refreshed with painted cardboard cutouts or live film clips from the mainland.
    The evidence to date of some imported scats, (foxen-shizer) would indicate that this Tasmanian version of a Fox, is not unlike a singular Fox Pooper of smallish proportion, (imagine something the size of a field mouse,)that hides in the day and the night, does not eat Fox baits, (so they cannot have a mouth, has no other identifiable evidence than ‘there out there alright!’

    All the latest gadgetry of sensor cameras and trip lines, whatever form capturing gimmickry is put into practice, well the result is somewhat perplexing, for all we ever hear from the worthy FEPers is,”damn it, that there old Fox has outsmarted us again?”

    The number of indigenous species Quolls, other carnivorous critters, that have succumbed to Foxbaits have been plenty, however not even a foxes shadow has been captured?
    If we are to believe our former minister for everything noxious, poisonous, toxic or destructive, there should by now, be Foxes hanging out of just about every tree?

    Perhaps this could be where the FEP now concentrate their resources, Foxes lurking high above ground, maybe even hiding in disused bird nests?
    As an aside to this possibility, perhaps Forestry Tasmania rangers might be encouraged to come forward and relate to the Tasmanian people of any Fox-sightings in these small bird’s nests, during the ritulistic removal of our Native Forests from all over this State, mostly for wood-chipping of course, not much of it is suitable for anything more than as chipper chomper fodder for Gunns Ltd to further subsidise their mighty export business of little bits of smashed up wood and big bits of sawdust?
    A lot of our nasty old animal habitat trees are found to be ideal for conversion to wood-chips according to a anonymous Forestry Tasmania source, who made the claim, “we do this in case the old habitat trees are full of breeding Foxes.”

  22. Ian Rist

    October 8, 2010 at 12:12 pm

    It would appear the Genie is out of the bottle.
    Pathetic little Llewellyn trying to blame his own Police and National Parks, how dare he.
    Llewellyn very well knew the truth.

  23. Philip Lowe

    October 8, 2010 at 11:50 am

    David Llewellyn,how could you.What a piece of bitchy,arse covering ,backstabbery.Go and wash your mouth out with soap.

  24. Ian Rist

    October 8, 2010 at 11:31 am

    All I can say is DEJA VU.

    Must admit though Llewellyn looked a tad uncomfortable.
    Especially with his own Police Department briefing him in July 2001 and the expose of the 2002 Stateline file clip.

  25. J A Stevenson

    October 8, 2010 at 11:26 am

    The Fox Control Association has been advertising for a number of years for notification of any mating foxes heard calling. Except for a dog fox being reported south of Hobart and a vixen in the Smithton area in 2007, no reports have been received since. Even if foxes are here they have not been breeding.
    J A Stevenson FCA. hythorn@aapt.net.au

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