Tasmanian Times

Economy

The FPA strategy is a failure

The Forest Practices Authority’s 2009/2010 Co-ordinated Smoke Management Strategy for planned burning is a failure.

Can you believe the aim of the CSMS trial is to try and maximize the amount of smoke pumped into the atmosphere which people breathe?

When nature has had enough of all the plannedburn smoke like last week, it vomits it all over us.

The CSMS trial is a failure because:
• It uses a primitive algorithm to predict weather conditions which are often wrong. The Bureau of Meteorology acknowledges “actual” smoke calculations have considerable uncertainty.
• It is voluntary, many burners are not using it so it flawed.
• Many existing burns are not taken into account so the modeling is wrong.
• Real-time results of the calculations are not being made public.
• All the burns and their details are not on one public accessible internet map.
• It uses airsheds which do not relate to populated areas.
• It says it is safe to burn when wind direction is predicted towards populated areas.
• Burns increase background smoke for some time after the burns are deemed to be out.
• It is secretive and pro burner, i.e., not for the benefit of the greater population.
• Respiratory patients are suffering badly. Cardiac patients are at high risk.
• Many people will have their lives shortened as a result of the raised smoke levels.
• Health effects from particulate matter occur after exposures of just 2-4 hours or less in duration of wood smoke at the 12 – 29ug/m3 range (Koenig et al. 1993)
• Readings have been up in the 100’s of ug/m3 for hours at a time here in Tas.

The burning of forest industries waste must stop and the failed FPA’s smoke trial must end.

HERE: Malini Alexander, earlier on Tasmanian Times: Forestry smoke: This is outrageous and indefensible

Author Credits: [show_post_categories parent="no" parentcategory="writers" show = "category" hyperlink="yes"]
4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Concerned Resident

    April 27, 2010 at 5:06 pm

    I agree with you Salamander but I think we dream…While we have the ‘Big Business’ orientated gov’ts I honestly can’t see things changing. Hopefully the outsiders in the state parliament will force some kind of change for the good of the population.

  2. Shirley Brandie

    April 27, 2010 at 2:11 pm

    I, among many others, am revolted by what I have read and seen in Tasmania.
    Burning takes precedence over the health of the residents? How sad to think that the officials allow this to go on.
    It’s time for the people of Tasmania to let them know, loud and clear, that they are not going to put up with the poisoning of the people and environment any longer!

  3. salamander

    April 26, 2010 at 5:00 pm

    It is time for a change, time for real accounting of the effects of forestry, time for the people to come first before the interests of industry.

  4. Charles and Claire Gilmour

    April 26, 2010 at 4:23 pm

    All for the con job of selling the idea of local jobs, jobs jobs … that’s the mantra anyway. Be damned with the consequences.

    One could suggest when large amounts of public money are involved it brings out the shonks, sheisters, desperate to get their hands on some of that free money. One could also suggest it is therefore basically representative of government and its entrenched wheeler dealers attitude.

    What is the point of trying to encourage large investment in the state (especially those that are linked to government subsidy funds), if it not only brings out the worst, but like the comparison Rick has well drawn, also like the NBN rollout, Ta Ann, Forestry … they all bring in workers from outside the state. Forestry has/had many a NZ worker brought in, Ta Ann in Smithton brought in their own Malaysian workers and equipment, and spent bugger all locally. The same will undoubtedly happen with the pulp mill.

    There is a saying: ‘like attracts like’. Do government con jobs bring out the unsafe, money hungry con artists? Apparently so.

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Receive our newsletter

Copyright © Tasmanian Times. Site by Pixel Key

To Top