Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Economy

Tasmanian olive oils strike gold

At the Australian olive oil industry’s night of nights on 27 October in Canberra, the awards were announced for the nation’s – if not the world’s – most outstanding extra virgin olive oils (EVOO) for 2009.

The annual National EVOO Show is now regarded as the benchmark, the most prestigious showcase of Australian olive oils, attracting exhibits from all olive oil producing regions in Australia, from the Margaret River district in West Australia, to the well-established groves of South Australia, the world’s largest groves in northern Victoria, the Hunter Valley and Mudgee district in NSW, and the smaller groves scattered through Tasmania.

This year the show attracted a record 210 exhibits across Australia, most (113) in the single-estate class producing over 200 litres, the class into which a number of Tasmanian groves now fall, although some still fit in the micro-volume class (50 – 199 litres). Other classes include multi-estate groves and flavoured oils.

Two Tasmanian oils, from Lentara Grove in the Tamar Valley and Forth Valley Grove in the north west, won gold medals in the most competitive single estate section, placing them in the top rank of Australian premium olive oils. Both were tested with free-fatty acid levels of 0.11, well below the limit of 0.8 required for classification as extra virgin, and also below the average of all qualifying exhibits. Lentara’s oil was also well above the average polyphenol level of exhibits, an indicator of high nutritional value.

Another Tasmanian oil, from Cradle Coast Grove in the north west, won gold in the micro-volume class.

All three Tasmanian oils scored 17 of a maximum 20 points judged across a range of organoleptic qualities, after being tested on international standards of EVOO. These results were only exceeded by two other of the 210 entries, one with a total of 18 and one with a total of 17.5.

Tasmanian EVOO is now consistently stamping its mark at the highest level of quality, the three groves mentioned here and others also winning awards across the country in other shows. Lentara Grove and the southern Tasmanian Ashbolt Grove also won Vogue Produce Award gold medals earlier in 2009.

image

Pictures: From Peter and Di Henning’s Lentara Grove, Tamar Valley

Author Credits: [show_post_categories parent="no" parentcategory="writers" show = "category" hyperlink="yes"]
4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. d nicholas

    October 29, 2009 at 12:02 pm

    Obviously the Tamar Valley is already an operational and integeral part of Barty’s food bowl initiative from which comes some of the most wonderful tasting produce available.

    Congratulations to the Henning family for the award they received, but could the picture be a far different one if growers had to contend with methyl mercaptan and other fugitive odours day and night decade after decade?

    What we have in this valley is worth fighting to the end for.Let’s up the ante and ensure Gunns can’t build a stinking anti-social health affecting pulp mill here.

  2. Bob McMahon

    October 28, 2009 at 4:00 pm

    Congratulations to Di and Peter Henning of Lentara Grove near Exeter. As a consumer of about 12 litres annually of their stunning oils I feel especially privileged to be able to access the best olive oil in the country – does that also mean the world? What an embarrassment of riches we enjoy here in the Tamar Valley.

    Comparing an imported supermarket olive oil to Lentara is like comparing a chiko roll to a meal at Daniel Alp’s Strathlynn Restaurant. (Daniel uses only Lentara olive oil). See you there on Dec 12 for the annual TT dinner.

    Thanks again Di and Peter. Such flavour sensations enhance life.

  3. John

    October 28, 2009 at 3:47 pm

    Hi Lindsay,
    Thanks for this informative article. Do you have any information as to how to contact these Olive Groves?

  4. Philip Lowe

    October 28, 2009 at 3:24 pm

    Very interesting to see that this magnificent oil was produced in the Tamar Valley.Will a pulp mill in any way compromise the quality of such produce?
    If it does,how does this fit in with David Bartlett’s vision of a Tasmanian food bowl?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

To Top