Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Environment

A challenge to Dr Amos

John Hawkins Chudleigh

Here is a challenge for you Dr Amos, try this for size and lets see if the doctor is on spin. The Government Statistician supplied the following facts in 1985 and Gunns supplied an extra map in 2007. When the going got tough the Government Forestry statistics were no longer published, they were incriminating to Forestry Tasmania and I suggest the spin line you are pushing.

The key is productive areas, NOT reserved land. There were, in 1985, 2,214,000 hectares of commercial quality timber that covered 32% of the state over which pulp wood concessions of 1,937,000 hectares were given, leaving 277,000 hectares of commercial quality cover exempt from logging for pulpwood. This area of 277,000 hectares is now the battleground. The rest in white was either unloggable, inaccessible, above the tree line, or the trees are unsuitable for the pulp industry and as can be seen this comprises approximately half of Tasmania.

The map below …

Download: TasTimes_January_23_2009.pdf

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. William Boeder

    May 31, 2012 at 12:52 pm

    Further to this excellent example presented by John Hawkins, then your comment #1 Garry Stannus.
    I believe it was at about that time regarding an article topic along some similar theme, if my memory serves me correctly, it was also given some detail by myself posting a comment in response to a Mark Poynter comment published in this matter around that time on Tas Times, so even then the pro-forestry pulp-wood crazies were side-show spieling out their land volumes percentages as opposed to actual measured out volumes of land.

    At the heart of this matter of quoting reserved areas having been locked out from logging due to land volumes including the World Heritage Listings and other prohibitive factors, was when those of the brotherhood claimed the enormous percentage of inaccessible reserves now well exceeded the available Native Forest logging area as expressed by percentages?

    Twas then that the details of how much of this “reserved area consisted of steep rocky terrain and high volumes of land covered in Button-grass as was by then discovered as part of the percentage stipulated volumes of reserves” which were prohibited from clear-fell logging for pulp-logs.
    When I initially arrived into Tasmania I recall the much bandied about percentage figures of 81% of forested land as being already exempted in permanent reserves thus unfairly preventing the further logging for pulp-wood logs in these supposed forested areas.
    Hence my condemning the use of the beguiling percentages so determinedly being touted as an accurate measuring tool.
    In an interesting aside to this claimed prohibited area, for those who have travelled the Western Explorer Road leading from the Tarkine in the North- down to the mid West area of Corinna, (most all of the land specified as being the central portion of this area on the right, is mostly covered with very sparse shrubbery and enormous button-grass sweeps and rises.)

    Nice try Forestry Tasmania, only this time, no cigar!

  2. Peter Bright

    January 25, 2009 at 12:36 pm

    Am I alone in preferring poverty to senseless environmental destruction?

  3. Garry Stannus

    January 25, 2009 at 10:47 am

    A heartfelt thank you to John Hawkins, the author.

    Sometimes in company, when the last piece of cake is on the platter, we have played the ‘take-half-and-leave-half’ game. Some more cake? Oh, yes please, I’ll just take half. And so we do. We always leave half! Pretty soon we’re down to trying to halve crumbs.
    As another writer noted recently, if reserves remain static in size, and as remaining bush outside reserves dwindles, and if we consider all the bush statewide, then we will see that the percentage that is in reserves actually rises!
    [and we haven’t actually reserved a single extra tree!]
    This year we’ll log half of the half that we didn’t log last year and next year we’ll log half of the half that we don’t log this year… …

    ‘… another half piece of cake. anybody?’

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