Tasmanian Times

Environment

PAL Policy Review

Bob Loone

Put clearly and simply the reviewed PAL policy facilitates unrestricted rights for MIS plantation forestry corporations to destroy our farms, cause ongoing economic losses, gross fettering, loss of agricultural production potential, and turn all but 4.3% of our farmland into unsustainable forestry plantations. All protection of farm destroying, unsustainable, plantation forestry must be remover from the policy.

SINCE the inception of the PAL Policy in the late 1990’s its real and primary purpose has been to ensure MIS plantation forestry corporations have unhindered access to our highly productive farmland to the demise of council’s rate base, agricultural productivity and the economy.

• The policy’s purpose and objects make statements about protecting agricultural production, community input, and sustainability; then it facilitates and ensures free passage for the direct opposite to occur.

• The PAL Policy supports and facilitates MIS plantation forestry’s destruction of agricultural production, economic activity, biodiversity, scenic values, communities, soil fertility, and water availability etc.

• The revised PAL policy specifically facilitates and promotes the loss and fettering of our precious farmland to plantation forestry.

• The PAL policy has already facilitated the loss and destruction of huge areas of our highly productive farmland (that we will desperately need as Climate Change increasingly ravages the world’s food potential). PAL can more correctly be called the Plantation Allocated Land policy.

Ownership of large areas of our farmland is already in danger of going to absentee overseas interests and multinationals. The PAL policy forces councils to give MIS plantation forestry corporations unhindered access to over 95% of our precious agricultural land.

Put clearly and simply the reviewed PAL policy facilitates unrestricted rights for MIS plantation forestry corporations to destroy our farms, cause ongoing economic losses, gross fettering, loss of agricultural production potential, and turn all but 4.3% of our farmland into unsustainable forestry plantations. All protection of farm destroying, unsustainable, plantation forestry must be remover from the policy.

Bob Loone,
Chudleigh.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. alison bleaney

    August 27, 2008 at 5:04 pm

    http://catchmentdetox.net.au/play-game/

    Catchment Detox, an online catchment management simulation game, is an initiative of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), in partnership with eWater CRC, the CSIRO, the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR) and National Science Week.

    The program was developed by the eWater CRC as part of its catchment management software packages (see here) into a game to go live during National Science Week.

    Great game, catchment survival over 50 years, with input from human dalliances and Mother Nature of course. Each catchment has to make a monetary return and not loose it’s population – great game, and the lessons learnt will be no doubt communicated to us at the end of this time.

    If PAL or MIS were played in this game, they would produce a “toxic catchment” or a destroyed catchment – in the terms of the game of course!

    So, the moral of the story is??

  2. Brenda Rosser

    August 26, 2008 at 2:47 am

    “Ownership of large areas of our farmland is already in danger of going to absentee overseas interests and multinationals. The PAL policy forces councils to give MIS plantation forestry corporations unhindered access to over 95% of our precious agricultural land…”

    It’s so hard to understand why the people of Tasmania keep voting in people who have sold off the Australian farm. Perhaps it’s because the Australian (and Tasmanian) press are monopolised by big industry interests with vast investments in the plantation/woodchip industry.

    The strategy seems so simple. Don’t vote for any of the federal and local parties that have supported industrial monocultures. Don’t purchase newspapers and other items (made of woodchip pulp). Don’t invest in their industries. stop voting in rednecks on local councils who are determined to ignore the wishes of their electorate.

    Either the people in Tasmania are ignorant (in which case the media has a lot to do with it) OR the elections are rigged.

    I don’t know which one it is, frankly.

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