Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Environment

Kamloops …

John Hawkins

Kamloops is North Americas second largest pulp mill, its chimney (illustrated) is half way up a mountain to take the pollution out of the valley. It is about to close, and I quote “Kamloops Pulp Mill is in trouble and senior management is scheduled to meet with worker representatives to avert a possible closure, this is panic mode, Communications Energy and Paper Workers Union President Dave Coles said in an interview with a reporter on June 28th 2008. The company is being squeezed by a high Canadian dollar, inflation and energy related costs and over 1,000 jobs are at stake.”
Thursday, August 28, 2008
Ms F Reynolds
The Letters Editor
Launceston Examiner
editor@examiner.com.au

Dear Fiona,

With regard to the letter on Kamloops Pulp Mill in Canada, I Googled it, which is what a smart Letters Editor should have done.

Kamloops is North Americas second largest pulp mill, its chimney (illustrated) is half way up a mountain to take the pollution out of the valley. It is about to close, and I quote “Kamloops Pulp Mill is in trouble and senior management is scheduled to meet with worker representatives to avert a possible closure, this is panic mode, Communications Energy and Paper Workers Union President Dave Coles said in an interview with a reporter on June 28th 2008. The company is being squeezed by a high Canadian dollar, inflation and energy related costs and over 1,000 jobs are at stake.”

Further quotes from Sludge Watch Kamloops:
“There has been a great deal of controversy over the pulp mill considering burning sludge from their effluent ponds laden with toxins, as safe disposal of this sludge is difficult to achieve. The problem of disposing of this toxic material can lead to some extremely bizarre solutions.” I personally like this one “The gourmet mushroom cultivation, apparently mushrooms will flourish on the toxins.” This is a solution that should suit Gunns for it will extend its wine interests into champignons!

Another good quote “I clarified my position that I would not like to see the mill shut down, I simply want the mill to be held accountable for their environmental and health impacts.” http://www.yourkamloops.com/2007/07/why-i-voted-aga.html

Every child in this state should Google Earth to see the damage the timber industry is doing to the native forests of Tasmania. Thank god for Google.

John Hawkins

Chudleigh 7304

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Justa Bloke

    August 31, 2008 at 3:53 pm

    I was in Corner Brook, Newfoundland, a couple of years ago. It’s in the middle of an area of great scenic beauty, close to a National Park with a variety of wildlife. I asked why it didn’t get many tourists, and the locals told me it was because of the pulp mill. The mill, right in the middle of the town, didn’t stink too badly while I was there (but I grew up in Burnie, so I’m used to the smell), but it does on enough days to have acquired a reputation which puts off visitors.

  2. Steve

    August 31, 2008 at 3:08 pm

    It’s an interesting follow up to the letter in the Examiner. Sort of thing that you would have thought the Examiner should be printing an article on. Topical and of interest to many of their readers.
    I noted the original letter was prominently placed. The same was not true for a follow up that pointed out the chimney into the next valley.

  3. Duncan Grant

    August 31, 2008 at 11:22 am

    Yes, I read the letter to the Examiner and Googled Kamloops. It seems that it experiences similar temperature inversions in winter as Launceston. The local council has banned backyard burn-offs and BBQ’s to help improve air quality but is reluctant to challenge the chief culprit due to job losses involved. It is also interesting to note from photographs, the change in colour of the river downstream from the mill. Kamloops appears to be a very conservative area and many of the local folk tolerate environmental degradation and adverse health for the sake of jobs and the economy. Sound familiar?

    The link below is that of Arjun Singh, a councillor fighting a lone battle against fine particle emissions.

    http://www.yourkamloops.com/2007/07/why-i-voted-aga.html

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