Tasmanian Times

Religion

Trinity: grossly premature

Christian Garland MR

“It is grossly premature for the Parish Council of the combined Parish of Holy Trinity and BayWest to discuss the disposal of Holy Trinity Church at a meeting on 26 February. A $20 0000 Conservation Management Plan (CMP), being funded by Hobart City Council, is currently being undertaken by independent interstate and local experts. Their final report is not due until late April/early May. The Parish Council must have that report in front of them and closely consider it before an informed and rational decision can be made about the future of the heritage-listed church.”.

CHAIRMAN of the Holy Trinity Church Support Group (Hobart), Christian Garland, has made the following comments about the media release made by Anglican Media Tasmania on 03 Feb 2008.

“It is grossly premature for the Parish Council of the combined Parish of Holy Trinity and BayWest to discuss the disposal of Holy Trinity Church at a meeting on 26 February. A $20 0000 Conservation Management Plan (CMP), being funded by Hobart City Council, is currently being undertaken by independent interstate and local experts. Their final report is not due until late April/early May. The Parish Council must have that report in front of them and closely consider it before an informed and rational decision can be made about the future of the heritage-listed church.”

A Charitable Trust was formed by members of the Holy Trinity Support Group in November 2007 and stands ready to receive title of the church, with all its fittings and furnishings intact. The Charitable Trust wants to open up the church to a much wider range of community activities. “We need to know the likely costs and time frame to restore the deteriorating sandstone exterior, and we won’t have that information until the CMP has been completed”.

Dr Garland also commented “Since Holy Trinity was closed in late October by Bishop Harrower’s order, our Support Group has continued to meet with senior federal and state politicians and potential benefactors about finding the funds to save the church and make it much more available for public use. Progress is positive but of course, we are all waiting for the CMP.”

“And in recent discussions with the National Trust of Tasmania, it is clear they remain highly concerned about the condition of the building” Dr Garland said. Holy Trinity was listed on the Ten Most-At-Risk Heritage Places in Australia in November 2007 by the Australian council of National Trusts.

The bells of Holy Trinity, silent since October 2007, will be heard on Monday February 11 when they are traditionally tolled for Regatta Day.

Author Credits: [show_post_categories parent="no" parentcategory="writers" show = "category" hyperlink="yes"]
2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Watcher On The Balcony

    February 5, 2008 at 4:22 am

    John B, and Leo Schofield in his Saturday Mercury column (Jan 5) put it bluntly: if we let these buildings go, they will never be rebuilt. With them go the ghosts, the trappings of our community’s history, and thus a part of all our lives.
    The Romans want their money and Pontious Pilate says his hands are tied.
    Perhaps, once again, the main players are in the audience. It is from there the crown of thorns can be removed, from there that the fatal nails can be stopped.

  2. John Biggs

    February 4, 2008 at 11:28 am

    It really is difficult to understand the Anglican hierachy’s decision-making re Trinity. It simply makes no sense to discuss the future of the building until the expensive and thorough Conservation Management Plan reports back. As I understand it, the CMP is looking into historical cultural and religious issues as well as the all important question of the state of the fabric of the building and what it needs to repair and maintain it. Until all that is made public, there can surely be little useful discussion about future uses.

    All this secretive haste seems to be overlooking the fact that Trinity has been a symbol of Hobart, not just Anglican Hobart, for over 150 years. The fact that the Hobart City Council is financing the CMP recognises that. Driving into Hobart from the North, the first thing that tells us we are home is the welcoming dominance of Trinity just as you crest the Domain hill at Clearys Gates.

    It is perfectly understandable that the Anglican church can no longer afford to support Trinity, but it surely has a responsibility to see that it is placed in responsible, caring hands that will link this beautiful building and its unique contents — organ, memorial windows, bells and other furniture — to the historical and cultural heritage of Hobart.

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Receive Our Weekly Tas Roundup

Copyright © Tasmanian Times. Site by Pixel Key

To Top