Julia Weston

We have a healthy platypus family in our dam which is fed from an underground stream emanating from a spring at the South Sister. This population has been there for years.

We have noticed devils coming back to the mountain. Some are healthy — a few are diseased. But the healthy ones have young in their pouches — sometimes three — and will raise them. Perhaps in the race for survival the healthy will prevail.
We have a healthy platypus family in our dam which is fed from an underground stream emanating from a spring at the South Sister. This population has been there for years.

We have noticed devils coming back to the mountain. Some are healthy — a few are diseased. But the healthy ones have young in their pouches — sometimes three — and will raise them. Perhaps in the race for survival the healthy will prevail.

Yesterday my husband saw a sleek, half grown wombat cross the paddock — the first healthy one for a long time. Those seen before had mange.

Our bird population is thriving: robins, (four kinds), fairy wrens, parrots, wattle birds, honeyeaters, all abound in the garden and soaring above are our nearby resident wedge tails — sometimes seen with a young one.

Unfortunately the population of quolls has diminished in the past few years and very few are seen now. Likewise with bandicoots.

Neither we nor the farm next door, the only two in the area, use chemical fertilizers or 1080. We are surrounded by native forest that hasn’t, so far, been logged. For the past few years we have been practising biological farming and putting back into the soil those minerals that have been depleted. We are assuming that our local environment is relatively healthy.

However, rainfall over which we have no control is a concern. We averaged out the annual fall since 1929 when records were started here, and found it to be 40 inches. So far this year at the end of the 9th month we have had 12 inches! Atypical or sign of the times?

Forestry Tasmania still have the local coupe on the South Sister mountain earmarked for logging. This is a source of our pristine and plentiful supply of water and right in the middle of this wildlife habitat. The return to the State for this exercise would be $140,000 in royalties.

Make this a nature reserve and the work we have done in protecting our local wildlife would continue with renewed vigour. Once the degradation begins, however, we are likely to see a rapid decline in what is looking like a bit of a come back in the wildlife.

I would like those who defend woodchipping/forestry at all costs to come and spend a few days here. But they seem to prefer to join those with the same mentality that made extinct the Tasmanian Tiger.

Ignorance is far from bliss — it threatens to kill us all along with the wildlife.

Poster image from: http://www.southsister.org/

Many earlier articles on South Sister are available: dial South Sister into Search …