Tasmanian Times

Media Release

Royal Hobart Hospital project chaos continues as job stops over safety and pay

The Communications, Electrical and Plumbing Union State Organiser Chris Clark says that the job, already plagued with a range of delays and issues, has stopped yet again for similar reasons.
“A safety walk of the whole site yesterday resulted in all workers ceasing work, until they can be provided with adequate emergency evacuation procedures.”
“By law, construction workers need proper lighting and signage to inform them of an evacuation path in case of emergency. Currently there are dark areas, blocked exits, and incorrect signage, which could be disastrous in an emergency.”
Rectification is continuing today, with most of the job still closed this morning, according to the Union, adding to a mounting list of lost time on the job due to breaches of safety standards
“There was a similar need to cease work in some areas for the same reason only a couple of months ago, and this is the exact productivity over safety mentality which leads to injuries, or even worse, fatalities.
The builder, John Holland Fairbrother called a cease works it’s so bad, and that’s really saying something.”
This comes on the same day that AE Smith & Sons Tasmanian workers, begin industrial action over massive wage disparity between local and mainland workers who are employed by the same company.
“AE Smith workers are rightfully angry that the company sees fit to pay local workers over $30,000 less per year working next to someone on mainland rates.”
“Workers commenced partial work bans yesterday, and will be walking off the job at 11am today in support of their claims just to be paid the same as their co-workers.
“Their parent company, Downer, has failed to see the inequity in this, and these are the attitudes which have left the industry in a massive skill shortage.”
The Union also says the issue goes further than just this company, and site.
“Tasmanian trade wages are a disgrace compared to workers flying in, and the old argument of cost of living is well and truly gone.”
“Licenced trades in Tasmania are on average $15 per hour behind Victorians with the same qualifications, and we wonder why our young people leave. Our broken workplace laws will only continue to make this worse.”
ceputas.com.au

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