Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Article

SFFP Calls for an immediate BAN on 1080 Poison

Media Release: 

Tasmania can ill afford the risk to our endangered animals, the wedge tailed eagles, spotted-tailed native cats, Tasmania devils, let alone the risk to our fragile aquatic waterways.

Ken Orr said “We recently became aware of the government’s plan to lay more 1080 poison in central highlands area later this week. Companion animals, native animals and birds die as well as the targeted species, in a slow inhumane and agonizing death from 1080 poison.1080 is banned in several countries, including places such as Brazil, Slovenia and Thailand.

Places where many perceive animal welfare standards are secondary. This is proving to be untrue as the Tasmania government continues to advocate the use of 1080 poison and ignore the science”. Even neighbouring properties cannot stop the use.

This government has no shame and consideration for animal welfare and must be held to account”.

Orr went to say “There are many viable, humane and cost-effective methods, these include ground-based hunters and shooters to control wallaby and other pest grazing animals. These are proven effective techniques, humane and selective in their target species.

I totally understand land owners need to reduce pest grazing species, to reduce both environmental and agricultural impacts. However, I argue that the control methods used should be as humane as possible. The available evidence on the effect of 1080 on affected species indicates that it is not a humane poison.”

Sodium fluoroacetate, more commonly known as 1080, is a poison that is being extensively used in Australia to control ‘pest’ species. 1080 is inhumane, as it causes a prolonged, uncomfortable death. with a slow and agonising death lasting between 8-24 hours for birds and 2-4 days for large mammals; including non-targeted animals.

The use of 10 poison has resulted in hundreds of deaths to non-target victims, including pets and native animals, who consume the bait or eat the flesh of poisoned animals, as these bodies remain poisonous until they are completely decomposed. 1080 is also extremely dangerous to humans and in particular, children.

Animals affected by this inhumane poison animals endure vomiting, screaming fits, seizures, agonising death. 1080 Poison has no place in Tasmania, not when we have an army of qualified and capable volunteers to assist land owners with effective animal control.

Shooters, Fishers and Farmers Tasmania “SFFP” calls on those in parliament today, to unite behind public sentiment and ban the use of 1080 poison now.

Link to Petition to BAN 1080 in Tasmania

https://www.change.org/p/minster-sarah-courtney-ban-1080-poison/psf/share?source_location=petition_show&psf_variant=combo&share_abi=1

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Pete Godfrey

    October 3, 2018 at 8:12 am

    It wasn’t that long ago that we were told by our government that 1080 did not kill any non target species. It was claimed that birds were not harmed at all and that other species did not take the baits.
    As usual we were lied to as the eucalypt plantation owners greed came first.
    I believe that we should subsidise decent fences for boundaries of farms. That way the native animals can happily live in the forested areas and the farmers can farm.
    It would provide plenty of work for people too, installing wildlife proof fencing on farm boundaries.
    Poisoning is a disgusting option that should not be used on our native animals.

    • Russell

      October 13, 2018 at 7:47 am

      I agree Pete, but I think farmers should put up decent fences in the first place.

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