Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Economy

March 3 – The day Tasmanians willingly crossed the line …

First published March 5

This week will see a play out of election post mortems, regrets and general dissolution.

However, regardless of how dire things seem for the next four years in Tasmania, on a global scale our state continues to remain as one the best natural environments to live in despite another term of conservative Liberal governance claiming a mandate for every issue they see fit.

By late Saturday evening it became glaringly obvious that Tasmanians have a long way to go to understand how they are governed and politically manipulated. If ever there was an opportunity for Tasmanians to educate themselves regarding corporate influences over their democratic, social and civil rights then the 2018 state election was it!

Sadly this election day we witnessed Tasmania’s democracy being bought out beneath their feet by vested interests.

Most Tasmanians were fully aware of the political influence of the pokie industry, yet come the ballot box’s final moment, they ignored the warnings, and simply voted without a conscience.

From this day on Tasmania’s democracy will never be the same.

Big business has always influenced political outcomes through party donations, though leading up to March 3 it was blatantly transparent who was heavily financing the Liberal party’s campaign. The subsequent return of favours for the Liberals being re-elected will be a classic case of contemptible quid pro quo.

Tasmanians knew what was going down, and swallowed the Liberals’ advertising messages hook, line and sinker. This was done without any consideration towards the precedent being set of buying an election in the House of Assembly.

This event was essentially a turning point in devious, underhanded and deceptive vote-buying. Not to mention the hoodwinking and coercion that will shame our political representation across the state for quite some time.

Just 24 hours before the polling booths opened the Liberals were exposed to their shock and outrageous policy towards relaxing gun laws in Tasmania. This policy had almost slipped through the net, and subsequently caused outrage from many in the community. However it seems that by the time the policy was leaked most Tasmanians had already made their decision that the Liberals should be re-elected.

Besides the gun-law relaxing policy, the Liberals have another 170 undisclosed policies they will attempt to impose upon all Tasmanians over the next 4 years. Although there was no disclosure of all of their policies, the Libs will use their majority to claim they have a mandate to do so …

Tasmania’s extraordinary natural environment is the foundation of our admired lifestyle and future economics, and its integrity will be under enormous attacks on all fronts from developers and exploiters.

Over the past four years the Liberals opened the doors to anyone with a desire to either invest or extract. The question of how much more damage the Liberals can do is unknown, though we know the political intent and opportunity will prevail.

With our democracy now seriously fragmented we should brace ourselves for some disturbing times ahead …

*Ted Mead is still in disbelief that Tasmanians were so naïve and gullible as to what developed over the past few months with the pokie lobby taking complete control over election advertising. Ted’s immediate reaction was to consider buying a one-way ticket to New Zealand, though he still feels compelled to campaign for the environment in Tasmania until the last high conservation areas are protected knowing this is still many years before us.

Author Credits: [show_post_categories parent="no" parentcategory="writers" show = "category" hyperlink="yes"]
10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. TGC

    March 5, 2018 at 10:04 pm

    #8 … [i]”The democracy we thought we had has gone, Ted. Gone. No more. Just memories.” It’d be useful to have a description of the “democracy we thought we had” but which is now “gone”[/i]

    What’s the new one like and who voted out the old one?

  2. Robert LePage

    March 5, 2018 at 3:57 pm

    #1, TGC … Tasmania is wonderful .. it’s some of the people who live in it that are the trouble.

    If only we could send them to a camp on the mainland.

  3. Peter Bright

    March 5, 2018 at 1:07 pm

    You’ve written a fine article Ted, and I’m grateful for your insights.

    But where you’ve said [i]”From this day on Tasmania’s democracy will never be the same”[/i] I’m wondering which democracy is that?

    The democracy we thought we had has gone, Ted. Gone. No more. Just memories.

    Villainy reigns now.

  4. George Smiley

    March 5, 2018 at 11:07 am

    We should all profit from the patently obvious that we should have learned from our mother’s milk, but is only the prerogative of hated minorities, like the Jews:

    If somebody wants to do you a favour run!

    The Chinese: You can always fool a guaylo.

    The Gypsies: After God made the marks he made a gypsy to take them down.

    And over these small wisdoms Will Hodgman strides like a colossus, with 50% support which you might correlate with the definition of IQ to wit half the population is necessarily on the low side of 100. Scary innit.

  5. john hayward

    March 4, 2018 at 11:54 pm

    I think the Lib’s election victory was a tribute to The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer, wherein an utterly cynical and unprincipled pollie played by Peter Cook sweeps to leadership of Britain via the lowest ethical road imaginable.

    Our Libs appropriated the same strategy in toto and won as a result. Good on all the idiots who keep the kleptocratic ethos of the island alive.

    John Hayward

  6. Lynne Newington

    March 4, 2018 at 1:42 pm

    To tell you the truth it crossed my mind when results came through maybe some voters weren’t being honest……especially with all the comments.
    I quess that’s what politics are all about.

  7. Chris Harries

    March 4, 2018 at 1:36 pm

    Simon (#3), it should be obvious what I was referring to in the context I was writing about.

    If any voter votes out of ignorance – because he or she is not able to understand complex information, or deceitful information or who has been cultivated by society at large into an overtly simplistic or prejudiced world view – then I won’t blame those people. Won’t blame those people. They are victims of society.

    This is a rider that I place over and above my view that the majority of voters will vote for their perceived self interest. The hip pocket is a way more powerful political button to press that is moral persuasion over justice or protecting natural habitats or future generations.

  8. Simon Warriner

    March 4, 2018 at 12:24 pm

    re #2 … this: “It was a salutary lesson though, that in the Australian public’s mind the (trumped up) power price issues was so much more important to them than was doing the right thing for their progeny in the face of catastrophic climate change. The problem there is a deficit in education, for which nobody can be blamed.”

    Not going to agree with you about that last sentence, Chris. I agree there is a deficit in education, but the idea that nobody is responsible for that deficit is not one we will agree on.

    The anglosaxon-dominated west has been degrading its education systems for the last 5 or 6 decades, and the price of that is now becoming obvious. The precise location of responsibility depends on who is answering the question, but there are definitely individuals and groups and particular governments whose actions have seen rigor, depth, breadth and focus removed from the education process to the detriment of those being educated. Meanwhile the Asians, Russians and others are spending serious public money funding their educations systems and treating the matter as one of vital national significance. Here we are treating it as a get rich quick scheme for university bureaucrats.

    The failure to be able to tell the difference between bullshit and wild honey is now so widespread that our mainstream media see fit to sell both under the same banner. See today’s online Mercury headline article for all the proof of that you will ever need. Apparently Will has now said the Libs will look seriously at donation law reform. Maybe it was one of those 170 policies they didn’t release prior to the election …

  9. Chris Harries

    March 4, 2018 at 10:44 am

    For governments, elections are about receiving popular mandates from the people to enact their policies.

    On Saturday the Tasmanian public willingly gave a mandate to the Hodgman government to maintain support for the pokie industry, to weaken state planning laws, to do harm in national parks and reserves, including 4WD track in the Tarkine area – to name some of the main contentious ones.

    These were clear cut, up-front election issues. (Later came the weakening of gun laws policy, but we can excuse voters for not being aware of that one.)

    Just like when Tony Abbott ran his campaign to axe the carbon price, Australian voters gave him a solid mandate to do so. At that time opinion polls showed that a clear majority of the Australian people opposed the tax. With that permission granted him, Abbott thus abolished the national carbon price and Australian’s carbon emissions immediately restarted their upward trajectory.

    In these election circumstances many campaigners argue that voters didn’t really vote on those issues, that they had other concerns, and so a mandate is not really given. That’s nonsense. When a major issue like the carbon price or pokie reform are turned into a core election issue, and the public votes conservatively, the people know full well what their vote is giving sanction to. They either support the winning side’s policy or they don’t care enough about it.

    Australia is a wealthy country and is therefore basically conservative in outlook. We have to accept this reality. That’s why both major parties are so right-of-centre these days and try to stay clear of reform issues. If Andrew Wilkie and the Greens had not provoked Labor into taking on the pokie issue, Labor probably could have won the election. But there again it could be questioned why they would have deserved government if they never stand up to anything.

    All that aside, these outcomes are not only to do with giving popular mandates. There’s no question that Big Money can buy public opinion and elections, as can deceitful campaigning. The Australian public opposed the carbon price because voters had been persuaded that it was increasing their power bills. In hindsight everyone now knows that was never true, but it’s what turned the public mind against it. It was a salutary lesson though, that in the Australian public’s mind the (trumped up) power price issues was so much more important to them than was doing the right thing for their progeny in the face of catastrophic climate change. The problem there is a deficit in education, for which nobody can be blamed.

  10. TGC

    March 4, 2018 at 9:59 am

    “Most Tasmanians were fully aware of the political influence of the pokie industry, yet come the ballot box’s final moment, they ignored the warnings, and simply voted without a conscience.”
    So this contributor has a very low opinion of a majority of his fellow Tasmanians – there must be some reason why he lives here – perhaps he likes the place?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

To Top