Summary …

For many years, oddsmakers have predicted that Dr. Goodenough would win the Nobel Prize, but so far the call from Stockholm has not come.

“The first car the family owned was a Model A,” he told me, with running boards and a lead-acid battery.

Dr. Goodenough has long been bothered by the shortcomings of his brainchild, and driven by the need to do better.

Of course, in a perfect world, the “Solid-state” battery would also be low-cost and lightweight.

Two years ago, he discovered the work of Maria Helena Braga, a Portuguese physicist who, with the help of a colleague, had created a kind of glass that can replace liquid electrolytes inside batteries.

Dr. Goodenough persuaded Dr. Braga to move to Austin and join his lab.

Dr. Goodenough started in physics and hopped sideways into chemistry and materials science, while also keeping his eye on the social and political trends that could drive a green economy.

Read the full article on the New York Times here
New York Times