Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Economy

Shooting the messenger … a subjective analysis of a new millennium Tasmanian inquest

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Simon Nicholson SC

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Caroline Graves

TT has finally been able to locate a picture of Coroner Simon Cooper … It’s in this ABC story, A Timeline of Key Events, HERE

As with the Gilewicz Commission of Inquiry, the Butterworth Inquest to me was flawed.

But who cares when it happens in this State? Who cares for my opinion? It’s been happening for aeons … everywhere and in all institutions.

Saw it in John Wayne movies. A young brave delivers bad news to the chief of the Indian nation and is speared instantly. Even then bad news was just too much to bear, so best if the messenger was disposed of.

Even today truth is a terrible burden for any society to carry, where it projects as fact a deep flaw in a social infrastructure based on concepts of pristine jurisprudence.

Particularly in a society where corruption is so ingrained, the corrupt don’t know they’re corrupt and take umbrage at being labelled as corrupt.

Particularly in Tasmania.

And so what am I saying? Butterworth of course. You know … Lucille?

Always knew that something was up! Cops hate nothing more than a meddlesome journo sniffing around the edges of their secrets.

Well the inquest revealed at least one deep secret that translates as the silence of the code within: that the second most highly-ranked cop broke every rule in the book and removed the Butterworth file from police archives.

Had I still been the ABC cop roundsman, with all my cop contacts, I wouldn’t have had to wait for a formal inquest to find that out.

For every bad cop there are scores of good cops … and good cops will find a way to find a messenger.

So it is nice to be told through a nice bit of PR BS from the latest commissioner about that file-stealing incident: ‘oh that was then and this is now’.

Translate that as: all the bad eggs are gone. Today we speak simple truths. Well then, so much for allowing my name to be dirtied by Mr Lance Lesage, described earlier to me by police as a congenital liar.

And so, we’ve had the inquest … thanks to the Tasmanian Times and a brave old man with a secret on his chest.

Farewell Don Hazell, now in his grave. I never got to see Don at the inquest that his conscience brought about. His integrity was unquestionable.

His community standing was immense. He had to get something off his chest and sought me out to do it. The State was left with no option but to have an inquest. I kept my distance from Don Hazell in the lead-up to the inquest because I know how things work in Tasmania.

And so I avoided the real possibility of a courtroom ambush accusation of ‘witness collaboration’. It’s from the dirty-tricks book of jurisprudence and it taints our justice system and casts a shadow of doubt on the integrity of even the noblest of practitioners.

Here’s the short version: if you have suspicions that there’s a cover-up bigger than God’s underpants (or bra) out comes the burning brand and sssst! Ouch! You’re a conspiracy theorist.

It soon gets out and about, because all the captains of industry circulate with PR purpose throughout the Tasmanian social infrastructure to sanitise their view of themselves. It takes a while, but inevitably the message in a bottle is also delivered by even the closest friends, especially when they’ve been sipping from the bottle … that you’re a conspiracy theorist.

I’m so pleased I did keep my distance.

Amazing what a spell as a super-fit, skilled young infantry soldier in the Vietnam milieu of the dirty-tricks’ books of mines, and fecal saturated punji stake traps, will do for your sense of survival.

It didn’t take long for me to realize that my Welcome Home was really to a much-worse jungle. And my cautious sense turned out to be right.

Lesage, the congenital liar tells the inquiry of my corroboration with him. Well then why wasn’t I charged with distributing false statements to the-then State Leader of the Opposition, to the ABC, to the police commissioner and indeed to the Butterworth Inquest?

I expected to be called as a witness, given that Don Hazell came to my Orford home for an interview that I transcribed for the Tasmanian Times – http://oldtt.pixelkey.biz/index.php/article/something-you-need-to-know – and placed onto YouTube.

And then the cacophony started. Every newspaper and TV and radio news service in the nation ran with the revelation of Don Hazell’s belief. That he had dug up human remains in the same place that Lance Lesage says he buried Lucille.

And then the inquest came along.

Four years after my interview with Lesage on December 9, 2011 at Buckland … who revealed that he told police in 1986 that he buried Lucille and was present when she was murdered.

A hell of a story Lance Lesage! …

That you picked Lucille up from a bus-stop in the company of a high-profile Sandy Bay footballer? You drove them both to the nearby Cornelian Bay Cemetery.

You went for a walk and a smoke and returned to the car where she was on the back seat under a blanket. You drove her to a place of soft loamy soil at Kingston and you buried her!

One hell of a story brave Mr Lance Lesage … who said his motivation to seek me out was to purge himself.

But one big story was far too big for me. I wanted nothing to do with it. In the public interest I met with you at Buckland.

Former ballistics cop Stan Hanuszewicz brought you to me. Hanuszewicz too was there in 1986 at Kingston where cops searched for Lucille’s body after your confession then.

But you both concurred that the ‘dig’ was purposely in the wrong place.

They didn’t want to find her you both concluded.

It was much easier for me to interview you and hand the material over. What a great starting place, my old workplace, the ABC Hobart.

I made the un-redacted video interview and an audio copy available to ABC TV News and Current Affairs and to ABC radio.

I sent a copy to Will Hodgman, then Leader of the Opposition and to Tasmania Police.

Anyway my duty done. I would do no more.

My pen rests and I enjoy retirement.

But the only thing louder than the cacophony of the news as to a breakthrough in Australia’s biggest missing-person mystery … was the silence!

Nothing!

Nothing from the ABC, nothing from the Opposition Leader, nothing from the cops!

And so it went to the Tasmanian Times and to You Tube.

Damn it, why not? I simply cannot ignore this. I have responsibility to pursue that wonderful maxim of all journo bibles, the public’s right to know!

At least it got the ball rolling. At least it was ‘out there’.

But the main media stayed away from it. To acknowledge a retired award-winning investigative journo and an online paper as the Tasmanian Times as the source of the breakthrough might be just too much for the modern Fourth Estate to acknowledge.

And so, it fell into something much worse than a quietude continuum … apathy.

The public had a right to know but most certainly NOT from a source as the Tasmanian Times or YouTube, from a journo meddling in the affairs of State and Fourth Estate.

May 8, 2014: And then, like something out of a modern sci-fi thriller … the contact!

David Plumpton, chief investigator of the Butterworth case in the company of Cary Millhouse met me at the Orford police station.

I agreed to a suggestion by former Intregity Commissioner Barbara Etter for her to sit in as legal shotgun/witness.

And here we heard that this guy Lance Lesage had revealed in 1986 the story that nobody believed.

That he drove a car to pick Lucille up under the instructions of a passenger, hero Sandy Bay footballer, Bobby Lahey ( http://www.themercury.com.au/news/tasmania/former-hobart-footballer-robert-lahey-denies-lucille-butterworth-claim/news-story/ea1ee2ec8ca9ac3eb2a36679d955ba4f ). They then drove to the nearby Cornelian Bay cemetery where Lesage the chauffeur was told to take a walk.

He went for a long smoke and came back to the car and Lucille was on the back-seat under a Tartan blanket. Under instructions they drove Lucille’s body to a sandy spot near Blackman’s Bay/Kingston.

Lesage buried her.

Plumpton and Millhouse are convincing. It is the same story that Lesage told me in the company of Hanuzewicz in a very cramped car on a very hot day.

Outside after the meeting with Plumpton and Millhouse at Orford, there is consensus between me and Barbara Etter that we accept the police view of Lesage.

That he is a congenital liar and has no credibility.

And so I drop it … until along comes another man with a conscience, Don Hazell, former mayor of Kingborough and a big name in State earthmoving business circles.

He made contact via a short note given to a friend who drops it off at my doorstep: ‘there is something that you need to know’ ( http://oldtt.pixelkey.biz/index.php/article/something-you-need-to-know ).

July 27 2014: Don Hazell comes to Orford and I interview him. That in the early preparation stages of a subdivision at Kingston Blackman’s Bay he dug up what he knew to be a human rib-cage.

But re-buried it!

Bad timing in careers and raising a family.

He would later describe what he found to university specialists in human anatomy and they confirmed that indeed Don Hazell had held in his hands, the rib-cage of a human being.

But whose?

It’s why Don came to me with his story. Ageing and conscious-ridden, he wanted to get it off his chest.

But, why me?

Why not the media?

He had read my postings onto the Tasmanian Times and saw the Buckland Tapp-Hanuszewicz-Lesage interview on YouTube.

As with Lesage, he left it to my discretion to do with it what I chose.

To him and to me and to Stan, it corroborated the Lesage story of picking up Lucille at the bus-stop, was present at her death near the Cornelian Bay Cemetery, drove her body to Kingston, buried her.

Thank you Don, now gone to your grave with this deep secret off your chest.

Thank you Don Hazell, for your courage.

Even if your story was, as you said, treated with disdain by David Plumpton.

How many times you called me afterwards to enunciate your disgust at being dismissed.

I transcribe Don’s interview.

Having lost confidence in aforementioned distribution channels to the State and its media, I post it onto the Tasmanian Times and YouTube.

Suddenly the news is rent with the Don Hazell revelations, lifted boldly from the Tasmanian Times, my distinctive home wall paneling as evidential back-ground where the interview took place, and no credit is given to the TT as the source of the story. The protocol days of sourcing the story have gone.

The government has no option but to bring about an inquest, not bad after about 47 years since this beautiful young woman disappeared.

But later I am to hear that the lawyer wife of David Plumpton whose policeman husband has been living and breathing the Buttworth case for so long, is also appointed to the Coroner’s staff … and I immediately and justifiably, ponder the objectivity and professionalism of the official probe.

Don Hazell has much ensuing interaction with David Plumpton and Hazell relates to me discourse with Plumpton that translates as a personal vendetta to publicly discredit Lesage for talking to me on Lucille’s fate.

Well as it turns out, it is Lesage who becomes the inquest hero and it is me who is discredited.

And to me of course the inquest was manipulated to shoot the messenger.

Lesage, the man cops describe as a congenital liar, the man who tells me the same story that brought about a police search at Kingston in 1986; the same story that he told the cops; the same story he allegedly told his lawyer in 1986 – that same story that he tells the Coroner’s court 30 years later, is according to him, the story that I told him to tell.

He tells the inquest that he met with me only four years ago and I gave him the Q&A’s.

And so why did Coroner Simon Cooper; why did not senior council assisting, Simon Nicholson, not direct the media NOT to use this amazing revelation that was broadcast all the way to the Middle East, until such time I could be contacted for verification?

The Coroner has such powers of direction.

What view did they hold of me to allow this blatant lie from a known congenital liar to contaminate my name? Indeed, I the messenger have been dragged quietly to a secret place of resting conspiracy theorists … and shot.

But the bastards didn’t shoot straight! The ambush backfired into ambush-drill.

“When the odds are against you and you have been ambushed, every soldier will turn and make way to the direction of the ambush … all weapons firing and shouting at the top of your voices.”

Amazing how a 20 year-old conscripted kid will remember survival drill 50 years later … and turn towards today’s enemy … shouting: “don’t you think you’ve shot the wrong man?”

Just a few days before my appearance before the Coroner, I am invited by SC Nicholson for a table conference and I am given a good hearing at an hour-long congenial meeting with his staff present.

I apprise Mr Nicholson that as soon as the inquest into Lucille was announced, I emailed the Coroner’s office, offering all material in my possession, including un-redacted interviews and transcripts of the interviews with Lesage and Hazell.

My email was acknowledged as being received.

I heard nothing from the Coroner’s office until months later when Lesage committed unchecked perjury at the inquest.

Instead of him being carted away and locked up, it was me. And I am now in survival ambush-drill mode. And so I am rightly reflecting on and questioning the efficiency of the Coroner’s staff when SC Nicholson turns to them at that conference table and asks to slightly shaking heads: “Did we receive Mr Tapp’s material?”

I also explained to SC Nicholson, with time-coded photographs on my laptop, taken as a record of my short time with Lesage.

I was hoping that SC Nicholson would do his duty and demonstrate to the Coroner that my time-coded photographs of Lesage at the Buckland Pub, Lesage and Hanuscewicz and Tapp in the Buckland cemetery after a failed interview attempt and shots of Hanuszewicz and Lesage at the Buckland Bridge, would prove his testimony a lie.

How long would it have taken me to give him the questions and practice the answers for the interview?

The time-coded photos would have proved it. My name would be cleared.

Lesage would be hauled back and asked why he had changed his story.

I would have expected Hanuszewicz to have been called to testify, but he wasn’t. His testimony was vital to my intended testimony that I didn’t get a chance to make under oath of burning in hell for eternity for perjury.

I cast no aspersions on the integrity of the Coroner, Simon Cooper, but it is my right to have my say. A Coroner’s court is essentially a police court. Police collect the evidence, counsel assisting presents it and directs the Coroner to a finding.

And so a few days after my most pleasant meeting with the Coroner’s staff, to give belated testimony to the coronial inquest into Lucille Butterworth, it is a different Simon Nicholson SC than he at the conference table just a few days earlier.

Don Hazell has already contacted me to say that he could only answer yes or no to long questions. But Don is hard of hearing, is unrepresented and tells me later of his disgust with his treatment, “they’re just a bunch of fucking idiots!”

At the GCI 2000 (Gilewicz) I got a chance to qualify some of my questions. But the terms of reference to a Commission Of Inquiry obviously do not apply to a Coronial Inquest in Tasmania.

Simon Nicholson is playing to the media.

How can I tell?

Well as a journo I’ve covered more court cases than anyone in this room, media, practitioners … and even his honour the Coroner.

I mean no disrespect and I can read the demeanour of those who ask questions. I have often seen practitioners cautioned as once I heard a judge in a case against a ‘scallawag’ defendant caution the father of the Premier, charming Mike Hodgman; warning him not to confuse the courtroom with a political podium.

Without the benefit of transcripts I can but only paraphrase my experience before Coroner Simon Cooper.

SC Nicholson asks multi-tiered questions of me and I tell the Coroner that I cannot and will not answer yes or no to convoluted multi-tiered questions, as they might incriminate me.

Nicholson then puts it to me, and his demeanour is more prosecutor than inquirer. To me the hearing is more an inquisition than inquest.

Why is he asking dumb-arsed questions?

Has he not visited my link to my book on Lucille as part of his research? I presumed that he had, as his file was chockers with printed transcripts of my material from the Tasmanian Times.

My as yet incomplete book that sets out the chronology of my search for Lucille and includes the interview with the man who admits to burying her.

My book which is a free download! In the deep public interest, it is a free download, that insists that anyone with information should contact the coroner’s office. I see myself as a friend to the coronial inquest, but will be described as an uncooperative witness.

Nicholson: “So you’ve written this novel about Lucille Butterworth … ?”

Surely he knows the difference? A novel is essentially a work of fiction that when even based on fact gives the author much discretion for embellishment.

If he has referred to my book online as I have so obligingly and cooperatively made a direct link to it, he would know that it’s not a work of fiction. It’s most definitely not a novel.

Tapp: “It’s not a novel.”

He persists with the question. I have already been warned by the Coroner, when asked by SC Nicholson what other books I have written. I tell the court that I am underway with the final of the Gilewicz trilogy … “Disquiet Continuum”.

And told by the Coroner:

“Don’t make speeches.”

SC Nicholson tries another tack and refers again to the Butterworth ‘novel’.

“It’s not a novel.”

The Coroner has had enough.

He orders me into custody. David Plumpton, incredulously, is the cop on coronial security duty. I am staggered at his presence.

The police officer charged for years with investigating Tasmania’s most enduring missing persons’ case, is the cop on security duty at the inquest into Lucille Butterworth?

He walks towards me saying: “I have to take you by the arm, Paul.”

I reply: “I’m hardly going to make a run for it, David”.

I am bemused.

Media is preparing an exodus to outside.

My section has been hit and I am the last man standing. I ask a fellow journo if she will contact my wife. Better to hear it from a familiar voice than hear it in the news.

An hitherto unknown young woman jumps to her feet from the public gallery. To me she is the Lady of the Lake where Tennyson’s winds have moaned ‘shrill, chill with flakes of foam’ for the duration of my time on the search for truth into Lucille.

I have been told earlier that one of Lucille’s brothers has referred to me as a worm, for making the reasonable suggestion in my book as to motivation for his sister being murdered … that perhaps she was in an unhappy relationship and was having an affair, was pregnant and had to be taken care of.

After all, there’s much evidence before the Coroner to suggest that Lucille’s relationship with her fiancee was on shaky grounds.

And I am being led from the court.

The system that I would have given my life for, the one that I lost three amazingly courageous and beautiful friends to, that sacrosanct, untouchable, glow in all our hearts, democracy, has abandoned me and my mind flees to fallen comrades and a time of heroic camaraderie that only soldiers could ever have the privilege to know.

I have become the personification of my own misplaced belief in justice.

I am a man alone.

And if this were really a novel, I, the main character would have fallen instantly in love with Caroline Graves former cop, now barrister, as her arm rose brandishing the great justice sword Excalibur, announcing to the inquiry: ” I now act for Mr Tapp pro bono!”

Sadly, her sense of fair play that made her jump to her feet was not reported. But the media have the sensational story. Former journo taken into custody as an uncooperative witness!

Uncooperative? How much more cooperative can one get?

From the outset of my work on Lucille I have publicly and openly importuned the Coroner as the repository of any information related to Lucille.

I have written him on the day the inquest was announced.

I offered all my material to his staff, yet now believe they simply didn’t bother.

Or was it purposeful?

I have referred in correspondence to those with interest in this matter of the possibility of conflict of interest with the appointment of David Plumpton’s wife to the coronial staff, as the Plumpton and Plumpton Show.

Outside in the lobby where courtroom security staff have come near in case I decide to scarper and have been nodded away by Ms Graves.

We go to a small room where I am technically in custody. She convinces me that it is my best interests to apologise for disrupting the proceedings.

If I do not, I’ll probably go to the big room and porridge for breakfast. It is put to me:

“Why would you want to go to prison?”

“Ummm, maybe to interview a prisoner I know who maybe shouldn’t be in there?”

But I do agree to her advice, as my wife will hear this on the news as journos have rushed as rabbits before a ferret, out of the burrow and to broadcast the sensation of perhaps the first Australian messenger to be shot in the line of duty.

There’s no way I’m going to allow a manipulated inquest to even remotely cause my wife of nearing 50 years to have a stroke at the news of my being held over in custody should I not apologise. She is home alone and friends will call her with the news.

And so I return to the courtroom and apologise. To my astonishment, Coroner Cooper, before releasing me from any further appearances, leans towards me from the bench and asks me if I am aware that two brothers (and he names them) are responsible for disposing of the body of Lucille Butterworth.

I am again incredulous!

The names of these two men, one now dead, have never been raised in this inquest … the living brother has never been proffered as a person of interest to this inquest.

Yet named to me, before I leave his court, never to return, by the Coroner, as one of the brothers who disposed of Lucille’s body.

Surely this is the big accompanying headline! Coroner Names Two Brothers Who Buried Lucille!

But again the silence. Not a word of this is reported!

Or did I miss it?

I shall give the man’s name to Lindsay Tuffin, so as it can be archived. I know the man that the Coroner has named. I wrote a bush-lawyer’s plea of mitigation for him when he was faced with prison for drink-driving and saved his arse from another term.

I am staggered at the Coroner’s revelations and their implications.

How do I interpret this? WTF?

This piece is for the Tasmanian Times record.

Knowing journalism as it once was I had an expectation that outside the courtroom I might be asked my opinion as to my temporary incarceration, so as to balance the story.

But not so. I am escorted away from the media, ironically by police officer Cary Millhouse. I make my way to my Orford home to my wife who has been pre-warned of my treatment by a sensational radio news flash.

That I was taken into custody for yelling at the Coroner!

Only the inquest transcripts will reveal this to be a sensational concoction.

But I want to be somewhere else. A little pub in a little town that has a little cenotaph where the names of relatives of the locals have been etched from wars since The Great War.

Real and ordinary men who have fallen by their tens of thousands to protect the sancrosancity of democracy … or at least their simplistic view of it.

I walk into the Spring Bay Hotel and am greeted by these people who really don’t give a damn for city-slicker justice.

They have their own.

A young man who spent his working life battling frightening seas as a cray fisherman, until he recently lost his boat, points a finger to the barman and a ‘handle’ of beer direct from the Antarctica is placed before me on the bar … and he gives me a silent nod.

Nothing else needs to be said … except a burning question on my mind.

What or who made Lance Lesage change his story?

Why has the man the Coroner has named to me as disposing of Lucille’s body not been part of the inquest process?

Why has the man the Coroner will name as Lucille’s murderer, not been charged?

Dare I proffer a reasonable guess? There’s not enough evidence to convict him? And at 80 years of age, he won’t be about for much longer and the truth will die with him.

Well at least the finding removes the Lucille mystery from the conscience of those entrusted to preserve the integrity of pristine jurisprudence and due process.

The whitewash machinery has done its job.

The missing Butterworth file has been found and closed for all time. Anybody who questions pristine due process in this State is just another conspiracy theorist.

But at the end of it all … why have I not been charged?

With what?

If the Coroner is convinced that indeed I, the messenger, covertly met with Lance Lesage at Buckland and concocted a lie to distribute to Will Hodgman, the police commissioner, and to the ABC … why have I not been charged with, dare I say it … conspiracy to pervert the course of justice?

Finally I am compelled to mention the courage that brought about the Commission of Inquiry into the death of Joe Gilewicz. It was lone voice Peg Putt, Greens MHA in the Tasmanian Parliament that paraphrased scores of anomalies in my manuscript, based on my investigation into his death.

The terms of reference for the 2000 GCI, conducted by Dennis Mahoney QC, were based on whether or not the Gilewicz inquest Coroner, Ian Matterson’s finding of justifiable homicide, may have been denied vital evidence.

But when the same witnesses for the Coroner, in this case, police, testify for the second time, and give the same evidence, the same findings can be expected.

Even so, justice must be seen to have been done.

Now where are today’s brave voices? I would like at least one to stand in the privilege of our Parliament and make this statement.

“Mr Speaker, conflicts of interests notwithstanding, I acted in 1986 for Mr Lance Lesage, who returned under police escort from a Western Australian prison … to undertake a search in an area in which he confessed to burying Luclle Butterworth. Mr Lesage conveyed to me then, the exact story that he related to Mr Tapp and that same story he resiled from in the recent Coronial Inquest into Lucille Butterworth’s disappearance.

Mr Speaker it is of the utmost importance that the Solicitor-General and the Attorney-General, make haste to conduct an independent inquiry into this matter, so that a man, dismissed as a cogent witness, as a police-described ‘congenital liar’ is permitted under the Coroners Act to abuse the legal privilege of our courts to sully far and wide, the reputation of any citizen, as in Mr Tapp’s case bent on assisting the Coroner to end once and for all the mystery surrounding the disappearance of Lucille Butterworth. To me it sends a clear message. If you have vital information, don’t come forward, for it may be better to secrete truth than to eke truth.

Mr Speaker, such an inquiry should question the integrity of the inquest from the perspective of accepting uncorroborated testimony and overlooking witnesses that can either refute or corroborate testimony. In this instance, Mr Hanuszewicz was a vital witness overlooked. He could have given testimony that at no time did Mr Tapp spend any time alone with Mr Lesage at Buckland before the interview. Conversely if Mr Tapp, the interviewer, did concoct questions and answers as stated by Mr Lesage, then surely Mr Hanuszewicz also was part of the conspiracy to pervert the course of justice … and dealt with accordingly.”

Oops, there I go, making speeches again! This meddlesome messenger cum bush-lawyer rests his case.

*Editor: Paul Tapp is a legend of Tasmanian journalism. A Vietnam vet, he started his journalism career decades ago on The Examiner. He has broken many stories over many years; including a stint as an award-winning journo with the ABC’s 7.30 Report (nationally).

• Barry Reynolds in Comments: I’m fed up with the claim that Lucille Butterworth is the oldest “unsolved” disappearance. My uncle disappeared in 1965 near Lake Sorell. Not a word from the Media or anyone else about that. It went back to the Coroner’s court about 3 years ago to get it off the books and in their wisdom decreed that he’d wandered off into the bush and perished. This was a bloke who grew up in the bush and a WWII vet but because of the reputation he had, which was fairly deserved by all accounts … not a mention anywhere. To make matters worse the police had a very strong suspicion who the culprit was but could never prove it. I feel for Miss Butterworth’s family as my father, uncles and aunts went through the same thing and the surviving family members still do. The story needs telling certainly and people brought to book. The big difference between Miss Butterworth and my uncle is that some of the main protagonists are still around … where in the case of my uncle they are not. I hope for her family’s sake there can be some closure … where in our case there won’t be.

• Simon Warriner in Comments: There is a lesson in all this. Especially when it is taken in concert with the case John Hayward wrote about earlier this year … ( HERE ). Governor Underwood was right in what he told the assembled students at Yolla School, that justice and the rule of law only ever prevails while the legal system and the courts have our respect. Mr Simon Cooper might well ponder what contribution his performance as described has made to respect for the “system”.

• Pete Godfrey in Comments: Hi Paul, well it really sounds like someone is being protected very well to me. And it is not you. How disappointing to have so much evidence just ignored. As you say it seems to be the way things are done here. I went to an RPDC tribunal once to assist some folk in a planning matter. The whole thing was a farce that appeared to be set up to back the newly-made Protection of Agricultural Land Policy …

• Paul Tapp in Comments: Comments are appreciated. I expected to be treated with a bit more respect but as I told SC assisting that Lesage’s unchecked false testimony would make for an interesting chapter in my book on the Lucille mystery. But without becoming too cynical about the quality of jurisprudence in this State, I was urged by many to at least put my treatment on record. Not just as an insight into how we who dare, fare at the coal-front of probity are treated but to acknowledge the courage of practitioners as Caroline Graves who readily came to my assistance. My view now is that such a hearing should never have been before a coroner, given the enormity of logistics required to hear accounts from witnesses from such a diverse demographic. But its early days and I would like to think that Madame Jurisprudence might be doing some probing of her own to ensure that witnesses should not be so intimidated by an antediluvian yes/no system to a point where they simply won’t come forward …

• Isla MacGregor in Comments: Paul, your battle with the corrupted adversarial legal system in Tasmania sends a big message to the Tasmanian community – that the adversarial legal system has gone past its use by date and we must implement the truth seeking European inquisitorial system of justice in Australia. You are not alone Paul – there are many in Tasmania who stand shoulder to shoulder with you yet.

• Lynne Newington in Comments: From a distance, something wonderful going on here. Strong men standing for men whose allegiance isn’t to a political or religious body.

• lola moth in Comments: … It is sometimes difficult to do the right thing when it comes to our justice system. Sometimes we are made out to be the bad guy when all we are trying to do is help. When the people we thought were on the same side as us turn around and bite us we hurt all the more from the sense of betrayal. Just remember Paul, that the only person who is right behind you all the way is Lucille and she appreciates everything you have ever done for her in this case.

• Paul Tapp in Comments: … Pete Donnelly had gone to my ‘funeral’ (a namesake) and drove on with a friend from SBS to my home in Orford, when he knew I was still in the land of the living. Must admit we laughed a lot. But he did tell me all my material, award-winning footage, stories and the high-profile coverage of events in my tenure as cop reporter at Aunty had been removed from ABC archives. Sadly and ironically at the same time as I was tangling with the Butterworth inquest, Pete died and I didn’t get to see him off …

• Paul Tapp in Comments: … A debate must include the fact that my information, readily made to the coroner seems to have been purposely denied him. If so, the implications are John Haywood, that the renovators were hard at work so that all the simple-minded taxpayers who unwittingly support the largesses of our subjective justice system can simply watch the footy and the reality TV shows and the no-news news without much time to think about anything else. And that’s exactly what the renovators want.

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29 Comments

29 Comments

  1. Paul Tapp

    September 27, 2016 at 4:08 pm

    Lola Moth @14, thanks for contributing with that anecdote which translates as witness intimidation. I’ve covered many court-cases and have noted that in so many cases witnesses, so new to the court-room stadium are terrified. And so unless they are summonsed simply don’t bother to come forward with what might be evidence vital to justice outcomes. So many witnesses in so many cases are humble beings unwittingly caught up in a surreal maelstrom of wigs, gowns and frowning judges, transported from their reality TV milieu to play some part in a Dickension B&W movie…and expected to number-crunch a tidal wave of questioning with a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Would love to have a beer with Lucille at the end of all this. Her case is so tragic.

  2. Paul Tapp

    September 27, 2016 at 3:30 pm

    I say again @ 27, there’s always a secret that those who know of it, want to get it off their consciences before they enter the great unknown. Don Hazell bore such a secret and came to get it off his chest that perhaps he could contribute to the puzzle surrounding Lucille. The new journalism, via courageous entities as The Tasmanian Times and indeed YouTube that allows the posting of interviews now plays its role in revisiting ‘cold cases’ as missing persons. As in this thread it now raises the question, how many unsolved missing persons cases are there in this State alone? Our police agencies can only do so much in most of these cases, given their limited resources and eventually the cases do run cold. But its up to those who know to come forward…as Barry Reynolds has done. And so too Brenda @27, let’s hope your posting too might excite a conscience and a resolution to yet another missing person.

  3. Brenda Rosser

    September 26, 2016 at 11:33 pm

    Barry Reynolds [No 2 comment] says “I’m fed up with the claim that Lucille Butterworth is the oldest “unsolved” disappearance. My uncle disappeared in 1965 near Lake Sorell. Not a word from the Media or anyone else about that. It went back to the Coroner’s court about 3 years ago to get it off the books and in their wisdom decreed that he’d wandered off into the bush and perished. This was a bloke who grew up in the bush …”

    Mr Younie also has been claimed to have simply disappeared into the bush at West Calder as well (maybe around 1970). I sort of expected the RMS forestry workers to dig up his skeleton as they harvest the plantation trees.

  4. Spikey

    September 21, 2016 at 11:40 am

    #25 it would be my pleasure

    And you have complete editorial ownership of what i may produce, though i doubt i will gain any pleasure from hearing more.

  5. Barry Reynolds

    September 20, 2016 at 1:09 pm

    spikey @ 19

    I might just take you up on that. It’s doing my head in trying to be factual without my personal bias coming through. Just for interest or non interest, I’m up to draft 24 after repeated scrapping of the previous attempts.

  6. Paul Tapp

    September 17, 2016 at 6:04 pm

    Ed, did you mean that the pub next to the Ex was the First Estate? And was that old journo the same old journo who said to me on my first day at The Ex, ‘call me Bert, son.”?
    Thanks for getting all this up, Ed. Needs to be on record, just in case it becomes a study-case for journalism.

    Ed: as you know mr tapp, a good journo never reveals his source (of free beer) … and he’s still alive (and yep, it was the first estate!x)

  7. Paul Tapp

    September 17, 2016 at 4:38 pm

    Love the analogy JH @ 22. I remember well as a working journo when heads of faculties at UniTas were always ready to give an academic opinion of events as the Butterworth case. It is this silence,more than universal apathy, that I raise in my story. Does it also apply to journalism? I must make a reasonable observation that since it has been taught in universities, it has deteriorated. But again do those who watch, read and listen to our daily news understand my maxim that you judge news by not what is in it, but what is not in it? Not that I am a contender, I read where a major Tasmanian utility is looking for a journo for its team, the essential qualifications being a uni degree in journalism. That keeps me out. What about you, Lindsay*, Burton and the many other contributors to the noble TT? Back to Lucille. Comments do not reflect the number of viewers of an article. But I do know how it works. Every Crown ministerial advisor would have read this piece and would have advised their bosses…to ignore it and it will go away now that a belated inquest has been held and Tasmanians have been officially told that it was a convicted murderer who dunnit. Well, I’d just like to see debate in Our House as to whether controversial subjects as ‘whodunnit’ allegations should in fact be the burden of a coroner, or rather a special inquiry, whose outcome then becomes the subject of a coronial inquiry. Perhaps it’s a debate for the Upper House. The other matter is that traditional paradox called ‘client confidentiality’. Did it permeate the Butterworth Inquest and deny the coroner relevant, if not vital fact…in my view of course.Had ‘client confidentially’ not been a factor, my name would not have been broadcast as ‘breaking news’ to the Middle East and back as a concocter or falsehoods. And so in that context I compress the Fourth Estate into all other Estates and the term ‘Separation of Powers’ has fled the lexicon of a well-sinecured Fourth Estate. So too must Parliament address ALL information denied the coroner. A debate must include the fact that my information, readily made to the coroner seems to have been purposely denied him. If so, the implications are John Haywood, that the renovators were hard at work so that all the simple-minded taxpayers who unwittingly support the largesses of our subjective justice system can simply watch the footy and the reality TV shows and the no-news news without much time to think about anything else. And that’s exactly what the renovators want.
    *Ed: Rules me out too … matriculated from burnie high as a 16 year-old, into journalism as a 16 years, nine-month old. first day on the job at the examiner … was ushered into the courthouse hotel for my first taste of beer by an old journo … who said … ‘this is the way to learn proper journalism son!x’

  8. john hayward

    September 16, 2016 at 1:39 pm

    As in the Sue Neill-Fraser or Waking in Fright, cases, the public generally would prefer not to know what lies behind the curtain of the Tas justice system. It’s more comforting to believe that this is one area of the Tas establishment that has retained some measure of integrity.

    Paul has torn another hole in the curtain concealing little but cronies. How many more holes are needed before the renovators are called in?

    John Hayward

  9. spikey

    September 14, 2016 at 11:45 pm

    #19
    If you want any help transcribing Barry, I’d happily offer my services.
    Personally I’d rather hear it as raw material.
    There are things that can’t be polished

  10. Paul Tapp

    September 11, 2016 at 6:14 pm

    I’m sure you won’t be the least eloquent of those who write for the TT Barry. Oops there I go making speeches and losing friends again. Good decision Barry, go for it.

  11. Barry Reynolds

    September 11, 2016 at 2:55 pm

    Paul @18. There was a couple of reports in the Examiner and Mercury (I believe but I’ve never checked their archives) at the time. The only people around now from that event are my father and an aunt and uncle. I will take your advice about submitting something to TT but I’m not the most eloquent writer

  12. Paul Tapp

    September 11, 2016 at 2:30 pm

    Barry @16. Should you sit down and do a chronology of events of your uncle’s disappearance, but using his name, and any relevant photos, submit it to the Tasmanian Times for consideration. At least it will be archived. As in my case, people simply make contact when they feel they need something to say, or get something off their chest. You never know what may come of it. I worked with The Examiner as cop reporter in the mid-70’s and never got to hear of anyone missing under suspicious circumstances in the Lake Sorell area in 1965. Police obviously didn’t log it as an unsolved cold case. But stuff like this isn’t purposely overlooked by the media. It just needs to raise its head and they generally will start asking questions in the right places. One of my memorable stories at The Examiner was the case of the missing Tiffin children. It was a total mystery. I sought out their father and ran a story in The Examiner that the cops didn’t like. Police said they were simply runaways and were being hidden by their interstate grandmother. My story brought about an amazing reaction. Somebody came forward and the man responsible for their deaths was serving time in prison for something else. He was tried for the Tiffin murders and was given a life sentence. And so Barry, either try The Examiner with your material and even though those allegedly responsible for your uncle’s death are now dead, The Examiner might resurrect it. Optionally do your best with the story yourself and send it to the Tasmanian Times.

  13. Paul Tapp

    September 11, 2016 at 2:02 pm

    Thank you Lindsay Tuffin and the TT team for posting and keeping this piece in front row for this long. Knowing how Executive Government works every press secretary and advisor to Cabinet Ministers will have read this as part of their duty to their bosses. The noble and courageous TT is singularly responsible for the Government’s decision to call a belated inquest into this case, never resolved in almost half a century. Notwithstanding the result, Lucille is still calling from her unknown grave, ‘find me’. I initially offered the Lesage interview to Four Corners and was promptly dismissed that it was a ‘local story’. Pity ABC Hobart didn’t ‘get it’. I should put on record that a dear friend and colleague ABC cinecameraman, Peter Donnelly came to see me several years after my posting onto Tas Times and YouTube, the Butterworth story. The story also contained some criticism of ABC Hobart for ignoring what would have been a breakthrough story, when I first offered it to them without the need for its source to be acknowledged. Pete Donnelly had gone to my ‘funeral’ (a namesake) and drove on with a friend from SBS to my home in Orford, when he knew I was still in the land of the living. Must admit we laughed a lot. But he did tell me all my material, award-winning footage, stories and the high-profile coverage of events in my tenure as cop reporter at Aunty had been removed from ABC archives.Sadly and ironically at the same time as I was tangling with the Butterworth inquest, Pete died and I didn’t get to see him off. Perhaps he thought it important to tell me. But it wasn’t me who felt cheated by the alleged removal of my material, but posterity, historians in particular. I will leave it to you to judge as to whether you run this anecdote. I have not been able to confirm the accuracy of Peter Donnelly’s revelations, for I have no friends at Aunty any more. Just how the community interprets stuff they hear on the radio, in this case the news flash that I’d been taken into custody, came from a Hobart friend with a shack near us in Orford. The friend rang in a panic to say that her mother had heard a news flash that “Paul Tapp has been locked up for murdering Lucille Butterworth!” I should laugh but it hurts

  14. Barry Reynolds

    September 11, 2016 at 2:00 pm

    Paul Tapp, We as a family are at a dead end as I said all protagonists are now deceased, including the investigating officer/s. The file such as it was, amounted to three pages and full of absolute crap. We have theories about what happened but will never be able to prove anything. The only thing I disagree about with the Lucille Butterworth articles is the phrase “oldest unsolved case” when in fact it is not and you could probably find others that existed from long before. I wish you well in your endeavours and hopefully Miss Butterworth’s family will find closure.
    Kind regards
    Barry Reynolds

  15. William Boeder

    September 10, 2016 at 10:31 pm

    A certain Labor minister has been provided with a comprehensive report toward a prior quite serious case of State government GBE Elderly Abuse, then the fact of the bias and abuse that had been incorporated into this case by a number of still practicing and recently retired legal professionals.

    I believe it is essential to have these supercilious posturing persons either placed in the stocks or paraded naked before the angry citizens along the main city Streets of Launceston.

    It is too early for me to expect any carefully considered response at this stage from this minister, however should he falter I propose to remind him publicly of his pledge as given by him full face to the Governor of Tasmania, to serve the people of Tasmania.

    Either way this case will continue to battle its way to the surface of due recognition against all odds, even having to rise above a number of covertly connived legal blocks that have been set in place to disallow its re-emergence and final just resolution.

  16. lola moth

    September 10, 2016 at 9:51 pm

    I was a prosecution witness at a very large trial in NSW over 30 years ago. I was to be called fairly early in the proceedings and waited patiently in the witness green room. Witness #1 was ushered into the courtroom. At lunchtime we were given sandwiches and tea but witness #1 did not join us. Witness #2 was called after lunch. I became concerned when I was called, as witness #2 had not returned for his coat. I asked the escort officer where the first witnesses had disappeared to and was told they were in the cells for contempt of court.
    My time on the stand extended into the next afternoon. There was several defendants, each with their own counsel, and I could not get my head around the different styles of inquisition each used. Some were straightforward but others asked several questions then asked for a yes or no answer. One wigged gentleman started out well with “I put it to you that……..” but then went on to tell a story with so many twists and turns that I could not find the question let alone the answer that he demanded of me. I figured I was heading for at least one night in the cells. Luckily, a recess was called and after a lengthy meeting in chambers all counsels pulled their heads in and if they asked an unanswerable question, a witness only had to ask them to clarify and they would change it. That trial lasted several months.
    It is sometimes difficult to do the right thing when it comes to our justice system. Sometimes we are made out to be the bad guy when all we are trying to do is help. When the people we thought were on the same side as us turn around and bite us we hurt all the more from the sense of betrayal. Just remember Paul, that the only person who is right behind you all the way is Lucille and she appreciates everything you have ever done for her in this case.

  17. Paul Tapp

    September 10, 2016 at 9:38 pm

    Thank you Isla MacGregor. Nice to know that you are still about. A bit more yet to come on this, but I need to be guarded before any further postings.

  18. Lynne Newington

    September 10, 2016 at 9:26 pm

    From a distance, something wonderful going on here.

    Strong men standing for men whose allegiance isn’t to a political or religious body.

  19. Isla MacGregor

    September 10, 2016 at 6:38 pm

    Paul, your battle with the corrupted adversarial legal system in Tasmania sends a big message to the Tasmanian community – that the adversarial legal system has gone past its use by date and we must implement the truth seeking European inquisitorial system of justice in Australia.

    You are not alone Paul – there are many in Tasmania who stand shoulder to shoulder with you yet.

  20. Paul Tapp

    September 10, 2016 at 6:17 am

    Barry Reynolds, thank you for contributing to this. It most certainly gave you an opportunity to raise matters pertinent to your uncle. At the end of the day Barry, it’s up to you to bring closure to your uncle’s plight. The media can only do so much in the public interest given the enormity of unsolved crimes and disappearances across the nation. I am sure the Tas Times would run a piece from you on your uncle’s disappearance. If he just went ‘wandering off’ I think his body might have been located. If you believe its foul-play, I daresay it would be well-hidden. If you have theories you can safely ply them so long as you don’t defame living individuals. I would like to hear more of this.

  21. Paul Tapp

    September 10, 2016 at 6:04 am

    Comments are appreciated. I expected to be treated with a bit more respect but as I told SC assisting that Lesage’s unchecked false testimony would make for an interesting chapter in my book on the Lucille mystery. But without becoming too cynical about the quality of jurisprudence in this State, I was urged by many to at least put my treatment on record. Not just as an insight into how we who dare, fare at the coal-front of probity are treated but to acknowledge the courage of practitioners as Caroline Graves who readily came to my assistance. My view now is that such a hearing should never have been before a coroner, given the enormity of logistics required to hear accounts from witnesses from such a diverse demographic. But its early days and I would like to think that Madame Jurisprudence might be doing some probing of her own to ensure that witnesses should not be so intimidated by an antediluvian yes/no system to a point where they simply won’t come forward.

    Ian Rist methinks understands how it all works in Tassie. I have a bit of a history beyond the Butterworth case and have come to my own conclusions that there are rewards for insouciance in this State. William Boeder I thank you for your ongoing support, even to the point of writing to police administration.

    I had in fact put the pen down to luxuriate in retirement with grand- children but find my treatment so out of left-field that it indeed seems to have awoken a sleeping giant rat. That’s journalism folks, may it ever always be a calling, rather than a career.

  22. William Boeder

    September 10, 2016 at 12:59 am

    As always Pete Godfrey your comments do so frequently consist of wise time proven facts.
    I thank you personally for your amazing rationale.
    I recently presented a miscarriage of Tasmania’s version of parochial justice to a State minister in that he displayed a great deal of interest there toward.

    How it will play out with the Tasmanian Justice system, well, I will eventually discover.
    The minister that I have sent my correspondences to can either mix in with the number of injudicious outcomes rife in Tasmania, and or lay low and abide by the unique inequities of Tasmania’s judiciary, then that their perceived view will properly attend and accept the evidence as fact, then their decisions as will be reliably presented.
    I will be posting comments on Tasmanian Times re this specific matter as there may be a real time that will allow this matter to be given the fair modicum of undented genuine justice that has been long sought in this case matter.

  23. Pete Godfrey

    September 9, 2016 at 7:57 pm

    Hi Paul, well it really sounds like someone is being protected very well to me. And it is not you.
    How disappointing to have so much evidence just ignored.
    Like you say it seems to be the way things are done here.
    I went to an RPDC tribunal once to assist some folk in a planning matter. The whole thing was a farce that appeared to be set up to back the newly made Protection of Agricultural Land Policy.
    There was no way that the tribunal would let the real story by put to them, it was just like a play with all the legal eagles lines written out long before.
    Hopefully one day your case will get a decent hearing.
    It is very concerning that you were thrown out of the hearing and had to apologise for not agreeing to be led.
    Good on you for standing up for yourself.
    The yes/no demanded answers are really only designed to deceive and lead the hearing to the desired result.
    Oh only if we had an inquisitorial justice system here.

  24. Ian Rist

    September 9, 2016 at 1:27 pm

    I would have to agree with most points made above…..

    From my own personal experience with the PAC Fiscal Inquiry into how the fox funding was being (and had) been spent was a farce, and absolute farce.

    Carefully selected witnesses, thirteen of the fifteen witnesses had either a pecuniary interest or worked for the Government or one of its agencies.

    Talk about stage managed, from the first few minutes it was about pushing the then Governments agenda of ‘foxes are here, foxes are everywhere’…what a joke. The final report was announced right on Christmas and a newspaper article was written by a journalist from a southern newspaper and released Christmas eve 2009 when everybody was busy wrapping presents and attending to family matters!

    Interesting though this same journalist was employed by that same Government a few weeks later and now is a PA to the opposition leader.

    All that said the current Government are in the same camp on fox matters…what people may not realize is that many of the senior bureaucrats that were the ‘brains trust’ and the ‘paperwork managers’ to the ‘fox farce funding fiasco’ are obviously now employed by the current Government (that knows the truth) and therefor any exposure of fox funding fraud would be a severe embarrassment to them.

    Forget the fox shit planters and the fox carcass importers/planters, they are only the mules and were only protecting their jobs anyway.

    Having given five hours of evidence to Tasmania Police I know they also know the truth, but how the final report is handled politically will be another matter.

    I believe Tasmania Police at investigation level did a very thorough job….but.

  25. William Boeder

    September 9, 2016 at 12:22 am

    Paul Tapp, just for the record I too had some association with this later resurrected case, in that I now seek to remind you that I had contacted Assistant to the Police Commissioner Ms Donna Adams regarding this case, in that first letter I had advised Ms Donna Adams in the fact that some of the presented evidence by you (in your then article) had not been followed up anywhere near professionally acceptable.
    Later her letter of reply went on to say that the disappearance of Lucille Butterworth was currently held with the police as a missing person case.
    Shortly thereafter my next letter to Ms Donna Adams went on to relay a story about the call of duty that every uniformed person had bound themselves to uphold during their time in service, then that this applied to herself as a serving police officer. (Re the Lucille Butterworth case.)

    Within 2 weeks there appeared in the Mercury newspaper a rather small article that this particular case may at some future time become a coroners inquest case.
    No I did not receive any further correspondence from Assistant to the Commissioner Ms Donna Adams after my second letter ‘which contained its suggested theme that she too must do her duty while wearing her police uniform.’

    So yes, by way of my personally prompting this police officer, I had since followed every sequence of events since the time you Paul Tapp had initially submitted your article for publication to Tasmanian Times.

    For reasons known only to yourself (and maybe a another person I shall not mention) had you later ignore myself and of my efforts to aid your call to have this article matter followed up more effectively by the Tasmanian police.
    I was not at all surprised to hear how the police records file of the victim (Lucille Butterworth) had lain scattered all about within the police records repository and that this case had been left in its former state of being ‘shrill cold and chill as the Lady in the Lake.’
    Here today I write here to set the record straight that I felt that this portion of my own pursuits in this matter may well have contributed to the final police department decision to treat this case far more intensively than it had since become so situated.
    I still commend you for all your considerable efforts given over the many years to have this case matter dealt with in a far more effective and disciplined investigatory manner so that each and all of your evidence facts could be properly and indeed more rigorously investigated.

    As a by-line to the comment relating to Coroner Simon Cooper, I can fully believe that this member of Tasmania’s judiciary would adopt or engage in a manner assumed by many to be somewhat contemptible, as I too have been placed under a similar ominous cloud when same had presided as magistrate to do with my claim dealing with a private matter.

    I confirm that my comment here is absolute in its fact.

    Regards to you Paul, I still hold a healthy level of respect toward you.

    William.

  26. Lynne Newington

    September 8, 2016 at 11:25 pm

    It’s sad to think he went to war and made it back home Barry……
    But with all the mates he had back in those days in the trenches amongst fear and tremor away from families and home relying on each other, do you really think they wouldn’t support him in his hour of need whatever the circumstance where ever he was?
    It’s the Spirit of the thing we often speak about….
    If you don’t mind me saying so.

  27. Simon Warriner

    September 8, 2016 at 9:37 pm

    There is a lesson in all this. Especially when it is taken in concert with the case John Hayward wrote about earlier this year …

    http://oldtt.pixelkey.biz/index.php?/article/waking-in-fright-in-the-tasmanian-justice-system/

    Governor Underwood was right in what he told the assembled students at Yolla School, that justice and the rule of law only ever prevails while the legal system and the courts have our respect.

    Mr Simon Cooper might well ponder what contribution his performance as described has made to respect for the “system”.

  28. Barry Reynolds

    September 8, 2016 at 8:25 pm

    I’m fed up with the claim that Lucille Butterworth is the oldest “unsolved” disappearance. My uncle disappeared in 1965 near Lake Sorell. Not a word from the Media or anyone else about that. It went back to the Coroner’s court about 3 years ago to get it off the books and in their wisdom decreed that he’d wandered off into the bush and perished. This was a bloke who grew up in the bush and a WWII vet but because of the reputation he had, which was fairly deserved by all accounts … not a mention anywhere. To make matters worse the police had a very strong suspicion who the culprit was but could never prove it. I feel for Miss Butterworth’s family as my father, uncles and aunts went through the same thing and the surviving family members still do. The story needs telling certainly and people brought to book. The big difference between Miss Butterworth and my uncle is that some of the main protagonists are still around … where in the case of my uncle they are not. I hope for her family’s sake there can be some closure … where in our case there won’t be.

  29. Lynne Newington

    September 8, 2016 at 3:53 pm

    A pity it’s out of the jurisdiction of this MP…

    http://davidshoebridge.org.au/portfolios-2/justice/.

    http://davidshoebridge.org.au/tag/justice-for-victims/

    He’s not afraid and won’t be coerced by anyone that’s for certain.

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