Tasmanian Times

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. No price is too high for the privilege of owning yourself. ~ Friedrich Nietzsche

Environment

First Day January …

Picture: Rob Walls, http://thisworkinglife.wordpress.com

First Day January …

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Picture: Rob Walls, http://thisworkinglife.wordpress.com

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Picture: Bob Burton of Tasman Island sandstone

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11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Peter Bright

    January 4, 2016 at 2:08 pm

    Leonard Colquhoun at #8 states: [i]’Those who sentimentalise about dear old, nice and cuddly Mother Nature should listen to the screams of death.”[/i]

    It troubles me that Nature has no conscience.

  2. mark h

    January 4, 2016 at 1:28 pm

    #9 ‘Who’s laughing now?’

    I’d like to blame a typo!

  3. mark h

    January 3, 2016 at 11:52 pm

    #8 Bob Brown, some time ago, decided he would not shoot another bird. He may need to re-visit that decision. As he takes aim Bob can say to that Kookaburra ‘Whose laughing now?’

    #savetheswiftparrot

  4. Leonard Colquhoun

    January 3, 2016 at 9:16 pm

    Re Comment 7’s asking “But are they also eating our baby Swift Parrots?”, a likely answer is “Yes” – if they are easy enough to catch, taste real good, and go down well.

    As Alfred Lord Tennyson put it in the 19th century, “Nature red in tooth and claw” – and beak, as well.

    Those who sentimentalise about dear old, nice and cuddly Mother Nature should listen to the screams of death.

  5. mark h

    January 3, 2016 at 2:15 pm

    ‘Kookaburras are almost exclusively carnivorous, eating mice, snakes, insects, small reptiles, and the young of other birds..’

    It is one thing to feast on a Skink salad. But are they also eating our baby Swift Parrots?

  6. Doug Nichols

    January 2, 2016 at 5:46 pm

    Re #1, at one time the UK’s calendar year began on 25th March (for reasons I don’t entirely understand, but to do with the equinox and dating back to Roman times). The tax year was aligned with that, so all was well.

    In 1752 the start of the calendar year was shifted to 1 January (finally catching up with the Romans yet again). The accountants, however, would have nothing to do with it and stuck with 25th March. The calendar change was part of the adoption of the Gregorian calendar, which also, and more significantly, required eleven days to be struck from the calendar for that year to bring things back into line with the heavens (Julius Ceasar having not quite got it right with his leap year scheme). The accountants would have nothing to do with that either, refusing to pay their taxes on the usual 25th March and instead waiting for the full 365 days to elapse and paying on 5th April. There it has stayed ever since (apart from shifting to 6th April sometime in the 1800s).

    So with that precedent, I give you exactly no chance at all of changing Australia’s tax year to 1st January!

  7. Chris

    January 2, 2016 at 2:18 pm

    This is the time to reward all those who have and still are contributing to our innovative society.
    Happy new year all.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/tony-abbotts-new-years-dishonours-list,8536

  8. Derbytas

    January 1, 2016 at 10:58 pm

    Because…

    All the tax department would be on holidays

    It is the festive season and nobody would be around to take any notice and then Finance would become less and less important to us all

  9. Karl Stevens

    January 1, 2016 at 10:53 pm

    Leonard Colquhoun. It wouldn’t work because accountants and auditors as well as the tax office need relatively sober heads. They need 6 months to recover from Xmas/NYE to ensure the entire tax burden is carried by individual wage earners, and that all multinational corporations pay next to nil.

  10. Bonni Hall

    January 1, 2016 at 10:00 pm

    Simple answer Leonard. Your solution is too simple!

  11. Leonard Colquhoun

    January 1, 2016 at 3:21 pm

    An ‘off the flightpath’ question: the 1st of January the first day of the calendar year – why not make it also the first day of the financial, fiscal and tax years as well?

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