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  1. Key sentence:

    “Too often, actions to slow ecosystem degradation do not address these indirect drivers. For example, forest management is influenced more strongly by actions outside the forest sector, such as trade policies and institutions, macroeconomic policies, and policies in other sectors such as agriculture, infrastructure, energy, and mining, than by those within it.”


    “Ecosystem degradation can rarely be reversed without actions that address the negative effects or enhance the positive effects of one or more of the five indirect drivers of change:

    population change (including growth and migration),

    change in economic activity (including economic growth, disparities in wealth, and trade patterns),

    sociopolitical factors (including factors ranging from the presence of conflict to public participation in decision-making),

    cultural factors, and technological change.

    [4] Collectively these factors influence the level of production and consumption of ecosystem services and the sustainability of the production. Both economic growth and population growth lead to increased consumption of ecosystem services, although the harmful environmental impacts of any particular level of consumption depend on the efficiency of the technologies used to produce the service. Too often, actions to slow ecosystem degradation do not address these indirect drivers. For example, forest management is influenced more strongly by actions outside the forest sector, such as trade policies and institutions, macroeconomic policies, and policies in other sectors such as agriculture, infrastructure, energy, and mining, than by those within it.”

    Source & ©: Adobe Acrobat DocumentMillennium Ecosystem Assessment Synthesis Report (2005),
    Summary for Decision Makers, p.19
    http://www.greenfacts.org/ecosystems/millennium-assessment-3/99-main-findings-4.htm#0

    Posted by Brenda Rosser  on  27/09/06  at  10:56 AM
  2. Brenda, you help us see a bigger picture.

    Metaphorically speaking there is a ‘dead rat’ pervading our dwelling but we cover it up with air freshener and for goodness sake, we’re certainly not alllowed to talk about it!

    Maybe it’s time that we really question the rhetoric behind Tasmania’s ‘clean, green, pristine’ logo.

    Posted by David Obendorf  on  28/09/06  at  09:41 AM
  3. We bombard our lands with biocides, spread Super everywhere, destroy our forests and wreck water catchments, release massive amounts of pollutants into the air and generally treat nature as if it were our enemy. We do this to the extent that most now believe we are changing the climate.

    Now we’re surprised that our wildlife is dying?

    Perhaps if we all saw the world through the same haze as our glorious leader, things wouldn’t look so bad.

    Posted by Richard Barton  on  28/09/06  at  06:05 PM
  4. ‘It’s all one big ashtray really’

    Posted by John Herbert  on  28/09/06  at  08:44 PM
  5. South Hobart Tasmanian Times readers, please keep an eye out for ulcerated platypus in the Hobart Rivulet. I got a report recently from a chap who found an platypus with these red ulcers on its body 3 or 4 years ago.

    They tell me behind the Cascade Brewery in the Gardens is a good place to observe platys.

    Also any fishers, please keep a look out this trout season in our lakes and rivers. Thank you.

    Posted by David Obendorf  on  10/10/06  at  03:51 PM

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