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  1. A very interesting and informative analysis.
    However, it is clear to me that Liberal and Labor supporters will probably not read all the way through this because there are things there they don’t want to admit to.
    It is also clear that both L parties are using the term ‘hung’ parliament very deliberately to scare voters and give the potential of a balance of power negative connotations, as Richard asserts.
    This is a very dangerous game for them to play - voters may one day reject their negative games and vote Green to spite them, giving the Greens the majority! This is obviously unlikely at the present, but sometimes a shift in voter attitudes isn’t always obvious until after the event.
    Particularly if they continue to claim they won’t work with other parties in minorities, voters will reject their uncooperative and bloody-minded attitude, prefering inclusive and cooperative politicians.
    Of course, they may not be able to change their attitude so easily.  It is interesting to see that for some diehard Liberal and Labor supporters the fear and hatred of the Greens is almost pathological.
    The premise that by eliminating the Greens in 1998 they would never have to worry about them again was indicative of people who cannot even imagine that there is an alternative point of view.  One of the most important principles of politics, I believe, is that one must always be prepared to consider that one might be wrong.  Central to this is the examination of someone else’s point of view.
    Can you understand why they might be saying what they are saying? Why do they feel this way?
    What is under threat to them?
    What can be done to alleviate this or to fix the problem?
    Sadly, for Liberal and Labor it appears that this is corporate donations and their corporate friends’ profits.
    Get elected at any cost and disregard any consequences as long as you look after those who support you.
    All you have to make sure you do is get away with it.
    The day the majority of the public as a whole sees through this is the day these people are not elected, and their support evaporates.
    I’m looking forward to it.
    Toby Rowallan
    Greens candidate for Denison
    4/411 Nelson Road
    Mt Nelson

    Posted by Toby Rowallan  on  25/02/06  at  04:54 AM
  2. I note with interest this week a Government department informing applicants for a part time position:  “the ability to work with others with dissimilar views”.

    I wonder if this requirement could be incorporated into Tasmania’s electoral act?

    Posted by Brenda Rosser  on  25/02/06  at  11:25 AM
  3. Thank you Richard for this considered assessment of the realities of politics in Tasmania post-1996. It is always difficult to get these measured opinions across in the fog of asn election campaign. Perhaps it reflects on how poorly ‘civics’ is understood and taught in our society.

    Understanding how our parilamentary democracy is meant to work above the cut and thrust of party control politics is so refreshing, because you sense there IS another way to behave and govern for all.

    This should be compulsory reading for all state candidates and the leaders of the three political parties.

    Posted by David Obendorf  on  25/02/06  at  11:27 PM
  4. Richard’s analysis seems fine in theory, but not on any theory based on the type politicians found here.

    If one tenth of the perceptions inspired by the major parties are true, they would obviously function much better in a different governmental system, such as a junta or plutocracy.

    Having just weathered three days of a Forest Practices Tribunal, I am now doubly convinced that this state could operate more freely without the occasional hindrances of established law.

    John Hayward
    188 Kellys Cage Rd
    Weegena 7304

    Posted by lhayward  on  26/02/06  at  09:46 AM
  5. Let’s throw an independent into this mix and see what comes out the other side.

    A contender for Bass is Les Rochester (http://www.lesrochester.com), strong anti pulp mill campaigner and a man with a positive vision for all Tasmanians.

    What would his entry into the fray mean for our wayward leaders?

    His platform “Your right to question” is apparently going down like a lead balloon with the powers that be.

    It seems our leaders don’t want community involvement, they just shower the folk of Tasmania with shiny trinkets in an attempt to swing them to vote for “the party” and all will be good for another four years.

    There is a wave of change sweeping Tasmania as disenfranchised and disengaged party supporters jump ship and voters who are sick of the same process year in and year out are riding this wave.

    This election can change Tasmania for the better, for the long term, for all Tasmanians.

    Posted by Dave Groves  on  27/02/06  at  09:49 PM
  6. Colaition governmetn s work well, when the philosophy of the contributing parties are inherently insync eg the Nats and the Libs federally.

    However, the Tasmnaina situation is quite different as the three parties are so very different!

    A further compounding fact is the small number of seats. There is effectively no ‘wiggle’ room of negotiate ‘in’ our ‘out’ of a position with such small seat numbers. And this is further compouned in a Parlaiemnt where 13 provides government.

    Posted by Elizabeth  on  28/02/06  at  12:07 AM
  7. Let’s throw an independent into this mix and see what comes out the other side.

    A contender for Bass is Les Rochester (http://www.lesrochester.com), strong anti pulp mill campaigner and a man with a positive vision for all Tasmanians.

    What would his entry into the fray mean for our wayward leaders?

    His platform “Your right to question” is apparently going down like a lead balloon with the powers that be.

    It seems our leaders don’t want community involvement, they just shower the folk of Tasmania with shiny trinkets in an attempt to swing them to vote for “the party” and all will be good for another four years.

    There is a wave of change sweeping Tasmania as disenfranchised and disengaged party supporters jump ship and voters who are sick of the same process year in and year out are riding this wave.

    This election can change Tasmania for the better, for the long term, for all Tasmanians.

    Dave Groves
    40 Kayena Road
    Kayena Tasmania

    Posted by Dave Groves  on  28/02/06  at  05:32 AM
  8. Thank you for the lovely picture Mr Colbeck.
    It clearly shows exactly why areas such as this in close proximity to the WHA should not be logged.
    When you peeped out of your plane window to take the photo did you think about the following.
    Soil erosion from logging on a substantial slope in a high rainfall area leading to soil loss and downstream siltation.
    Weed incursion in the area close to the WHA due to machinery entry.
    Habitat disturbance and loss.
    Disturbance of Aboriginal heritage.

    I bet you just saw dollars!!!

    Posted by Regan Parkinson  on  22/05/14  at  08:05 AM
  9. Lame argument Senator Colbeck,

    Expert analysis suggests more than 85 per cent of the area has not been logged, and that there is only a small amount of degradation or plantation timber. Further, UNESCO does not require an area to be “pristine” in order to be listed as a World Heritage Area.

    Peter Hitchcock, an international environmental and heritage consultant who has advised the Australian government on aspects of the Tasmanian Wilderness listing, including the 2013 extension, agrees. “The area of so called ‘pine plantation’ is 80 square metres - about a third the size of a tennis court - and had already been harvested,” he said.

    Mr Hitchcock says only 322 hectares of the 10,563 hectare Mount Wedge-Upper Florentine area, or around 3 per cent, has been logged.

    Lies lies lies. Anything to get back at those folk that want to protect OUR natural heritage.

    Posted by ivan carter  on  23/05/14  at  09:04 AM

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