Books

Transportation Press: Open for submissions from writers from Tasmania, India and Iran

Transportation Press
12.06.18 9:23 am

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Transportation Press publishes contemporary short stories from Tasmania, and around the world. Our next collection will include writers from Tasmania, Iran and India, and is now open for submissions of short stories of up to 5000 words. There is no theme and we are open to work of all genres including comics. The work must be unpublished and original, and in English. In future editions we hope to be able to publish work in translation.

So, if you are a writer from Tasmania, Iran or India, at any stage of your career, we welcome your contributions before our deadline of July 8, 2018. Send all work as a word attachment with a 50 word bio in the body of the email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Entry fee is $3AUD and must be paid at the time of submission. 
Click here to pay: https://transportationpress.bigcartel.com/product/smoke-microfiction-entry-fee All selected writers will be paid $250 for their work.

This work will be published in late 2018/early 2019, pending dosh, but we’re confident we can raise what we need.

Our editors for this collection are Shirindokht Nourmanesh (Iran), Kulpreet Yadav (India) and Rachel Edwards (Tasmania).

To date we can confirm that work from Booker shortlisted writer Jeet Thayil (Narcopolis) and Stella shortlister, Shokoofeh Azar (The Enlightenment of the Greengage Tree) will be included in this collection.

To get a sense of the work we have previously published, our backlist is available for purchase here: https://transportationpress.bigcartel.com/ 

Publishing books is not an easy process, so Transportation Press has partnered with the Australian Cultural Fund to offer tax deductible donations to those of you who would like to support us. If you’re flush right now, sling us a tax deductible donation by clicking here: https://australianculturalfund.org.au/projects/international-short-story-collection/ Please share this link amongst your mates, we are eternally grateful for all the support we get, it means we can keep publishing excellent stories

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Filmed, recorded or written a story about Tasmania people or its places recently ... ?

Photographer and author Andrew Wilson and founder of The Wayfinder Mobile Storytelling Studio, Helene Thomas
11.06.18 9:17 am

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HAVE YOU FILMED, RECORDED OR WRITTEN A STORY ABOUT TASMANIAN PEOPLE OR ITS PLACES RECENTLY?

IF YES, THEN WE’D LOVE YOU TO ENTER OUR FIRST EVER 30 STORIES IN 30 DAYS STORYTELLING COMPETITION. YOUR STORY COULD BE 1 OF 30 CHOSEN TO SCREEN AT THE STATE CINEMA ON SEPTEMBER 1 AND PRESENTED AS FEATURED CONTENT ON STORIESINSEPTEMBER.COM FOR 12 MONTHS!

YOU COULD ALSO WIN 1 OF 3 RESIDENCIES AT PARLIAMENT COWORKING AND A NIGHT AT MACq 01 STORYTELLING HOTEL PLUS OTHER PRIZES WORTH OVER $5000!

ENTER NOW! SUBMISSIONS CLOSE MIDNIGHT JULY 15, 2018 ...

Entries are now open ...

http://storiesinseptember.com/register/

Stories in September is a brand new platform for Tasmanian film, audio and print content producers to share and celebrate their stories with the world.

From the entries, our judges will choose 30 stories to be screened at the State Cinema on September 1 and featured on our website, with one story released everyday throughout the month of September.

Story entries cost $30 incl GST and are open from now until midnight on July 15, 2018.

So don’t delay, click here to register and enter your story! Find out more about the project including submission guidelines at storiesinseptember.com. Or check us out on Facebook or Instagram.

Stories in September. There are untold stories inside everyone and everyplace.

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Kindness creates new literary genre for Fiona

Paula Xiberras
04.06.18 6:13 am

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Fiona McCallum objects to people asking ‘what is your guilty reading pleasure?. Fiona has such a love for books she doesn’t believe there is anything guilty about reading in fact reading in all its variety and eclecticism is something to celebrate and deserves to be made ‘trendy’. Fiona makes a point of portraying her protagonist Hannah as an avid reader. It’s rare we see our heroine displaying a love for reading but this is exactly what happens in her latest novel ‘Making Peace’

Fiona has set ‘Making Peace’ in Melbourne, a city she lived in for four and a half years. On the subject of cities Fiona tells me she enjoys Tasmania and singles out Launceston’s Cataract Gorge as a particular favourite.

‘Making Peace’ is a unique piece of fiction because Fiona has created a new genre. It doesn’t fit into the romantic classification, although some romance is in the novel. Instead ‘Making Peace’s’ main focus is on the friendships between women demonstrating their relationships and strengths as they grow emotionally. Fiona describes her writing as ‘general fiction’ but more specifically she says it is ‘heart-warming fiction’ or ‘a journey of self-help’ fiction.

The main protagonist Hannah is a woman of such strength, that when faced with incredible tragedy, instead of harbouring hate reaches out to the other person touched by the tragedy to make peace. The irony of the title is that ‘peace’ is also the name of the other major character in the tragedy ‘Henry Peace’. All the while Hannah faces her fears with the support of her female network of friends and as the novel progresses Hannah learns to love life again.

To those that might think Hannah is too good to be true in her ability to forgive, Fiona says, it is unusual for us as readers to identify with such a character because for the most part, just as characters in books that like reading are uncommon so there is a lack of kind characters, who are able to surmount anger and create peace, in fiction, Once these attributes are possessed by more characters in fiction, hopefully they will be mirrored in real life.

Making Peace is out now published by Harlequin.

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Tasman Writers Centre: June Events & Programs

Tasmanian Writers Centre
30.05.18 3:20 pm

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Meeting a magician and a feisty one at that

Paula Xiberras
26.05.18 6:06 am

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Raymond Feist is a magician and a revelation. From his serious science fantasy novels I was expecting an encounter with a very serious fellow but instead when I was pleasantly surprised to meet a warm, funny and generously articulate fellow.

When I called Mr Feist recently and naturally enquired that it was indeed Mr Feist at the other end of the line he answered me “I really hope so otherwise there is someone else wearing my clothes!”

Raymond, who is visiting Australia, (one of his favourite places after his home in California) next month to attend Supanova and to promote his new book King of ashes, He tells me the title of the new novel visited him in a dream, in those creative Morpheus moments between sleeping and waking.

Raymond has visited Tasmania a couple of time and in 1987 he visited Hobart and Launceston on the whiskey trail, a trail he has still not completed. He did manage to check out larks (distillery) and the Casino and speaks fondly of the lovely people that came along for book signings. The old style back of bookstore signings are preferred by him to the large halls of 600 people although in saying that he is keen to meet the latter type of audiences that will greet him in Melbourne as a guest of Supanova.

Raymond prefers the old school signings at the back of the bookstore sadly now this has been replaced by the large halls of 600 people, the kind of audience that will greet Raymond in Melbourne.

Before becoming a bestselling author Raymond worked at a host of jobs including what we would call Pixie photographer. Yes, he does write science fantasy and possibly about pixies but this kind of ‘pixie’ is rather the name given to a brand of human baby photography. In Raymond’s case his job saw him door knock on houses to take portraits of babies and toddlers.

When he did become an author he was inspired by his writing heroes such as Neil Gaiman and his love of historical fiction. Even with his extensive catalogue of historically inspired writing Raymond still doesn’t take himself too seriously as illustrated by one of the many stories he tells me during our chat . In 1987 when he was on tour in Christchurch, New Zealand he was interviewed by a young woman who was filling in for the reporter that was meant to be doing the interview and she was not that informed about him. The young lad lady’s refreshing honesty impressing him very much.

This was one of the many short vignettes he shares with me throughout our chat, illustrating his storytelling ability. He tells me his priority is to tell stories that entertain but it’s an added bonus when his books can heal or change a reader’s life. There have been incidents when readers have told him they have read his book when they were particularly low or troubled and how his books would change their perspective. He’s thrilled his books resonate with others and can do their bit in making their lives better.  Grateful for the support of fans he’s equally diplomatic to those who are not fans of his work.

At one particular conference when questions were welcomed, a fellow in the audience put up his hand and piped up he didn’t like Raymond’s books! Raymond was quick to answer that is why we have different flavours of ice cream because everyone has preference for a different flavour. He later learned from the conference organisers that the person was a resident heckler and Raymond was the first to answer him back.

Another story Raymond tells me is returns once again to the adulation shown by fans.  At Toowoomba in 1987 fans decked him out as a king gave him a throne to sit upon!

Talking of decking out and clothes I realise we have come full circle as I find myself vicariously visiting Raymond’s wardrobe. Its garments a literally material manifestation of his deep relationship with Australia and New Zealand. Housed in his wardrobe are his West Coast Eagles, Brisbane Bears and All Blacks jerseys, which he no doubt wore on previous visits to football games in the two nations and impresses me with his knowledge of the history and rules of the codes.

Raymond even turns the interview around to quiz me on my career aims and expectations!

After an hour and a half of good conversation and too many stories to enclose in these pages I realise we have barely touched on Raymond’s book but he thinks those particulars best left to be discovered by the readers.

We say our goodbyes for now, in the hope that one day soon we may meet up in Tassie when he returns to finish that whiskey trail.

King of ashes is out now published by Harper Collins.

Raymond’s Australian tour details below ...

KING OF ASHES | SUPANOVA | AUSTRALIAN TOUR | JUNE 2018  
http://www.supanova.com.au/guests/raymond-feist/

SYDNEY SUPANOVA: Friday 15 June, Saturday 16 June & Sunday 17 June
About: http://www.supanova.com.au/events/sydney-2018/about/
Tickets: http://www.supanova.com.au/events/sydney-2018/ticket-info/
 
MELBOURNE: Tuesday 19 June
Raymond E. Feist in conversation with Chris Flynn
The Athenaeum, 188 Collins St, Melbourne VIC 3000
6:30pm for 7:00pm start
Tickets: $15
https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/meet-raymond-e-feist-at-his-only-melbourne-event-t ickets-44008379247?utm_term=eventurl_text

MEET RAYMOND E. FEIST AT HIS ONLY MELBOURNE EVENT
https://www.facebook.com/events/201631427096697/

BRISBANE: Wednesday 20 June

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Hobart Bookshop: Stephen Nicol’s The Curious Life of Krill

Hobart Bookshop
23.05.18 5:52 pm

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Join us at our next launch ... 

We look forward to hosting the launch, by Dr Nick Gales (Director of the Australian Antarctic Division) and Associate Prof Elizabeth Leane, of Stephen Nicol’s new book, The Curious Life of Krill: A Conservation Story from the Bottom of the World, published by Island Press.

An eminent krill scientist takes us on a journey through the dark, icy world of krill. Krill. It’s a familiar word that conjures oceans, whales, and swimming crustaceans. Scientists say they are one of most abundant animals on the planet. But few can accurately describe krill or explain their ecological importance.

Eminent krill scientist Stephen Nicol wants us to know more about these enigmatic creatures and how we can protect them as Antarctic ice melts. This engaging account takes us to the Southern Ocean to learn firsthand the difficulties and rewards of studying krill in their habitat. From his early education about the sex lives of krill in the Bay of Fundy to a krill tattoo gone awry, Nicol uses humor and personal stories to bring the biology and beauty of krill to life.

“Krill expert Stephen Nicol transports us to the world of one of the ocean’s most important, least-understood creatures. A krill is indeed curious: its ability to shrink when short of food, its intricate relationship with Antarctic sea ice, and its critical role in great-whale ecosystems. Read this book and you will understand our human relationship with krill, and feel that you have swum with it through Antarctic seas.” ~ David Agnew, Director of Science, Marine Stewardship Council

This is a free event and all are welcome.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square
When: Wednesday June 6th, from 5.30pm

 
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Hobart Bookshop here

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Black Inc: August Releases from Black Inc. Books

Black Inc Books
22.05.18 11:17 am

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Forty South Publishing announces new history writing prize

Lucinda Sharp DIRECTOR, Forty South Publishing Pty Ltd
16.05.18 2:08 pm

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Download ...

FortySouth_VanDiemanHistoryPrize2018_EntryForm.pdf

The Van Diemen History Prize 2018/19 - ENTRIES OPEN JULY 1, 2018

Good writing about history can be engaging, insightful, poignant or intriguing, but the underlying research will always be authentic and rigorous. To foster quality writing about Tasmanian history, Forty South Publishing is initiating a biennial prize for non-fiction history articles written for a general audience.

Open to Australian citizens or Australian permanent residents, the prize is for articles up to 3,000 words on any aspect of Tasmanian history prior to the 21st century.

The winner will receive a cash prize of $500 and publication in Tasmania 40°South. A selection of the best entries will be published in The Van Diemen Anthology 2019.

Entry forms and terms can be downloaded from the “Writing Competitions” page at http://www.fortysouth.com.au

Entry fee: $20 per article | Entries close September 24, 2018.

*PLEASE NOTE that previously published articles are eligible for entry but must be must be free of copyright for publication in Tasmania 40°South and the anthology

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Black Inc Books: How Neoliberalism Ate Itself and What Comes Next

Black Inc Books
16.05.18 12:52 pm

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Dead Right: How Neoliberalism Ate Itself and What Comes Next
Quarterly Essay 70
Richard Denniss

• Why are so many aged-care residents malnourished? And how is it that arms manufacturers sponsor the Australian War Memorial?
• In this passionate essay, Richard Denniss explores what neoliberalism has done to Australian society and asks, ‘Where to from here?’
• ‘Over the past thirty years,the language, ideas and policies of neoliberalism have transformed our economy and, more importantly, our culture.’
—Richard Denniss, Dead Right

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Art of preserving leaves a little jam

Paula Xiberras
11.05.18 6:24 am

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Ada Langton tells me she has strong links with Tasmania. Her family history goes back to her Victorian grandmother who was born in Launceston and her mother who was born in Burnie. Ada’s grandfather also served as an independent politician in Tasmania.

The connection to the state resonates with the most recent generation as Ada tells me she has introduced her children to Tasmania. Last July they visited Tasmania with a campervan trip. The freezing waters and temperatures of Mt Wellington was tempered by warming up with chocolate at the Cadbury factory.

The coldness of tragedy is warmed by love in Ada’s book’ The Art of Preserving Love’ Ada’s protagonist Eddie Cottingham is a young woman with her mind and heart full of the contemplation of love which seems to be reaching fulfilment in the   love prospect of Theo Hooley, the church organist.

This steady serene life fractures for Eddie when her mother dies in childbirth leaving Edie with the task of raising her fragile baby sister Gracie. Edie begins her challenge of caring for Gracie in two minds as Gracie is a reminder of Edie’s mother’s demise but at the same time Edie feels an overwhelming love for the angelic child.

The protection of Gracie becomes so all-consuming that Eddie’s love for Theo is relegated to the back burner. Edie’s sacrifice of her love parallels the sacrifice of those joining up for the war.

Theo, before he joins up, continues to woo Edie with constant visits to her house where he romantically leaves a token of a rose each time. The romance is registered by the town’s folk who eagerly await Eddie’s reaction and hope for a romantic resolution.

The story also highlights same sex relationships as well as the devastation of post -traumatic stress disorder.

The Art of Preserving Love is out now published by Harlequin.

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MKR or Maggie’s Kitchen Rules

Paula Xiberras
10.05.18 8:14 am

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Last year I chatted to the author of Maggie’s Kitchen, Caroline Beecham. Originally from Brighton in the UK, a place Caroline describes as, “south of London with colleges, universities and beaches with no sand”.

Caroline tells me she was working in London in the film industry when her partner procured a job in Australia. It was 1999, a fantastic time to arrive in Australia with the millennium ticking over and the focus on the Sydney Olympics.

It’s not only mainland Australia that Caroline loves but Tasmania too. She singles out Freycinet National Park which helped engage her energetic seven and ten year old boys while she favoured the Tasmanian wines.

Caroline book ‘Maggie’s Kitchen’ is the story of one of the kitchens during the war which provided wholesome meals for those in need. It was a time when women’s roles were changing too, as they took on the work of men who had enlisted in war. The kitchen is maintained by Maggie and her cousin Rose and aided by the Polish refugee Janek who creates some heat (not just from cooking) in the kitchen as the desired love interest of both women.

Kitchens like Maggies experienced difficulties with the war time shortage of various ingredients. The ingredients that were available needed to be utilised in creative ways to make them stretch. This kind of creative adventurous with menus leads Maggie coming into conflict with the ministry.

As a delicious addition to the novel Caroline has provided little epigraphs from the ministry of food at the beginning of each chapter and also includes some extra recipes for those that might like to try them. Caroline tells me that not being a big meat eater herself she let her parents cook up the offal recipe!

Caroline adds that researching and learning about those times of frugality makes her think of her broccoli stalks in a completely different way!

You can experience more of Maggie’s kitchen at the books website http://maggieskitchennovel.com.

Maggie says her second novel will revisit WW2 but this time the creative output is from a war artist with a contemporary story woven in.

Maggie’s Kitchen is out now published by Allen and Unwin

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Holly’s Heroic Healing

Paula Xiberras
09.05.18 7:11 am

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Holly Ford is yet to visit to Tasmania but she is aware it is known for its fantastic food she also believes her homeland of New Zealand has a similar natural beauty to Tasmania.

I called Holly recently to chat to her about her latest book ‘High Country Hero’, a book that can be read as a rural romance while also utilising the romance genre to explore the serious issues of dementia and post-traumatic stress disorder.

The main protagonist Lennie is visiting her grandparents in their rural home ostensibly to help her grandad to downsize his veterinarian practice but also to attempt to address the discontent that has arisen in her grandfather and grandmother’s relationship.  Lennie herself is a vet and a keen animal lover accompanied on her travels by her beautiful dog Pesh.

On a visit to a local pub a situation arises which local gentleman Mitch, a former acquaintance of Lennie’s, comes to her aid. Mitch’s physical strength impresses Lennie but she soon realises beneath that strength is a man considerably affected by his war experience and the trauma of losing his partner, a young woman who also had a special relationship with her pet dog. Lennie and Pesh bring back tormented memories as well as giving Mitch the prospect of finding love again, both of the human and canine kind.

The two ‘vets’ Lennie the animal doctor and Mitch the war ‘vet’ unite, with Lennie sharing her knowledge of the healing powers of animals. Another sort of healing must be found for the complex puzzle that sees her grandfather push his beloved wife away from him. A twisted knot of unsubstantiated fears comes to a head in the form of a gate left open allowing the animals to escape. Perhaps the open gate is a metaphor for our need to open our hearts and release our fears as a starting point to curing them.

Holly has written a many layered novel, one that can be read as an entertaining romance but also one that addresses prevalent issues of the times, in how we handle physical and mental maladies and how letting out pent up emotions out and the healing power of our human and canine companions in, can help result in a positive outcome.

High Country Hero is out now published by Allen and Unwin.

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New York Review of Books: Crooked Trump

New York Review of Books
04.05.18 8:15 am

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London Review of Books: Early Auden, Later Auden: A Critical Biography by Edward Mendelson

London Review of Books
04.05.18 7:08 am

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The Nib: Police technicality

The Nib
04.05.18 7:00 am

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Hobart Bookshop: Splint on an angel’s wing

Hobart Bookshop
03.05.18 11:07 am

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Splint on an angel’s wing

Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square
When: Thursday May 17th, from 5.30pm

Towards Light and Other Poems (Sarah Day)

Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square
When: Thursday May 10th, from 5.30pm

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Spinifex Press: Julie Bindel in Australia

Spinifex Press
01.05.18 2:38 pm

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1. Julie Bindel in Australia

Renowned international journalist, author and researcher Julie Bindel will be visiting Australia in July to speak at the Australian Summit Against Sexual Exploitation at RMIT. In addition to the Summit she will be doing a couple of talks and bookshop events - and will be available for a limited number of interviews around her existing engagements. Julie is the author of Pimping of Prostitution: Abolishing the Sex Work Myth published in Australia and New Zealand by Spinifex Press.

Please note: other Spinifex Press editors and contributors speaking at the Summit include Melinda Tankard Reist and Caitlin Roper from Collective Shout. Melinda’s Spinifex Press books include Big Porn Inc; Defiant Birth; Getting Real: Challenging the Sexualisation of Girls; and Prostitution Narratives: Stories of survival in the sex trade.

2. Lindsay Simpson’s book Adani: Following Its Dirty Footsteps scheduled for September 2018

Lindsay Simpson has doggedly pursued an incredible story: how could a company with a globally disastrous reputation for environmental destruction along with a dubious financial status woo an Australian Prime Minister, a State Premier and a handful of regional mayors to back a project to build Australia’s largest coalmine and the world’s largest coal terminal only kilometres from the Great Barrier Reef?

Investigative journalist, former academic and author, Simpson’s personal story reveals the truth behind the Adani controversy. Doorknocking at Adani’s Indian HQ to hand over a petition from the Australian Conservation Foundation signed by Australia’s most prominent citizens; she also lobbied politicians in Parliament House in Canberra, questioning their motives that ensured the mine was approved. Simpson investigates the power of the social movement Stop Adani which has captured the national imagination, proving that while Adani might have gained the political will to build the mine, it has never gained the social will of the people.

Adani: Following Its Dirty Footsteps documents the inconceivable story of how Australian governments abrogated their responsibilities to protect this world heritage icon; bypassing environmental safeguards, thereby irrevocably damaging Australia’s reputation as environmental steward of some of the world’s most valuable natural assets. This book lays bare the pecuniary interests of Australia’s leaders – serving a country which is the largest exporter of coal – and how money rules over protecting the environment.

About the Author

Dr Lindsay Simpson was an investigative journalist with The Sydney Morning Herald from 1983 to 1995. She is the author and co-author of ten books, many in the true crime genre. In 2007, she was awarded the Crime Writer’s Association Lifetime Achievement Award for her contribution to that genre. Her most recent book, published in 2014, Where is Daniel? was about the disappearance and murder of 13-year old Daniel Morcombe, documenting Australia’s largest manhunt which spanned a decade. Simpson’s first book, co-authored with Sandra Harvey, Brothers in Arms was made into a six-part mini-series entitled Bikie Wars (released in 2012). Read more about Lindsay here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindsay_Simpson

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New York Review of Books: Theatre of the Self

New York Review of Books
30.04.18 11:34 am

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New York Review of Books: Polymorphous Eden

New York Review of Books
27.04.18 7:30 am

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London Review of Books: Author of the Month: Dervla Murphy

London Review of Books
27.04.18 6:57 am

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Hobart Bookshop: Launch, by Dr Gina Mercer, of Sarah Day’s new collection of poetry, Towards Light

Hobart Bookshop
26.04.18 1:51 pm

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We are delighted to host the launch, by Dr Gina Mercer, of Sarah Day’s new collection of poetry, Towards Light and Other Poems.

Sarah Day’s previous collection of poetry, Tempo, was shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards and won the University of Melbourne Wesley Michelle Wright Prize. She has been a member of the Literature Board of the Australia Council and was Poetry Editor of Island for seven years. She lives with her family in Hobart where she teaches Creative Writing and English as a Second Language to year 12 students.

This is a free event and all are welcome.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square
When: Thursday May 10th, from 5.30pm

And keep an eye on your inbox for more launches coming soon ...

Hobart Bookshop here

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New York Review of Books: Confessions of an FBI Agent, Animal Liberation, The Power Broker

New York Review of Books
25.04.18 8:57 am

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London Review of Books: A Load of Ballokis

London Review of Books
25.04.18 7:29 am

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Spinifex Press: Dear Reader ...

Spinifex Press
24.04.18 5:39 pm

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London Review of Books: The End of the Epithet

London Review of Books
24.04.18 8:00 am

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Tasmanian Writers Centre: AGM Adjourned ... resume date May 4th

Tasmanian Writers Centre
23.04.18 5:30 pm

Dear writers & readers,

The Centre’s AGM was held on Friday April 20th, but was adjourned to give members time to consider the situation. The AGM will be reconvened at Hadley’s Hotel on Friday May 4th at 5.30pm. All members are urged to attend.

Although they will continue to assist the Centre up until the resumed AGM, the members of the existing Board have submitted their resignations, and will not be renominating. As a result, the first task of the resumed AGM will be to decide on a member to chair the resumed meeting and to oversee the election of a new Board of Management.

Members can acquaint themselves with the Centre’s Constitution – which is available below, and on the website. The current crowdfunding campaign is being continued so as not to pre-empt any decision by the membership and in the hope that funds may still be generated to enable the Centre to continue. Unless there is a significant change in the Centre’s financial circumstances over the next 12 days, the options available to the membership will be either to close the Centre and wind up its affairs or to reduce its operations to the bare minimum and continue as an associated body.

The 2018 Tasmanian Writers Centre AGM resumes
5.30pm on Friday the 4th of May
at Hadley’s Orient Hotel
34 Murray Street, Hobart

The 2017 annual report is also available on the website.

Our thanks to the staff at Hadley’s Orient Hotel for hosting us.

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
https://www.taswriters.org/

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The New York Review of Books: The Key to Everything

The New York Review of Books
23.04.18 7:49 am

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New York Review of Books: Poetry Month sale

New York Review of Books
21.04.18 5:49 am

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Aurora House Publishing: Eagle Shield ...

Aurora House Publishing
20.04.18 3:06 pm

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New York Review of Books: Will Trump talk to Kim?

New York Review of Books
20.04.18 7:51 am

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