Image for MEAA awards ... TT drew a blank ... but ...

Despite having Tasmania’s best investigative journalist - Bob Burton - Tassie Times drew a blank at the annual Tasmanian media awards on Friday night …

Bob’s entries included a series speaking truth to power, specifically donations to the Tasmanian Liberal Party by mystery donors. His catalogue of writing is Here.

So, MSM (Mainstream Media) swept the pool ...

But there was a very important speech to entree the evening by Adam Portelli, below, Victoria and Tasmania MEAA Regional Director; highlighting the extraordinary dangers journos worldwide face every day of their lives (not least in Russia) with dozens killed across the globe in the past year for simply doing their jobs ...

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Here’s the Media Release highlighting the winners put out by MEAA Tasmania President Mark Thomas …

Winners of the 2017 Tasmanian Media Awards announced

ABC veteran broadcaster Chris Wisbey has been named the 2017 Keith Welsh Award winner for outstanding contribution to Tasmanian journalism at the Tasmanian Media Awards tonight.

Wisbey has been on-air for the best part of three decades and was the unanimous choice of judges to the first Keith Welsh award winner since 2010.

“Chris Wisbey wins the 2017 Keith Welsh Award for his telling of Tasmanian stories. How he has dealt with sensitive issues with an engaging story-telling style… He has built an archive of people and places in Tasmania, telling uniquely Tasmanian stories about Tasmanians,” the judges said.

Richard Baines from the ABC won the Journalist of the Year and Best News Stories awards.

Sally Glaetzer from The Mercury/Tas Weekend Magazine won the Best Feature, Documentary or Current Affairs and Comment and Analysis categories and was a finalist in the Science, Environment and Health and Journalist of the Year awards.

WIN Television’s Brent Costelloe won his third straight award for Best Sports Coverage.

MEAA Tasmania President Mark Thomas said a record 130 entries were received for the 2017 awards, surpassing last year’s mark of 122. “Judges commented in all 12 categories about the quality and breadth of entries – from child protection, domestic violence, the Port Arthur anniversary and the devastating floods of 2016,” he said.

“Without a fair, independent and fearless media - print, TV, radio, online & social - we do not have a democracy. Fortunately, as tonight’s awards have amply demonstrated, Tasmania’s media and its journalists deliver some of the finest journalism in the country,” Thomas said.

Tasmanian Media Awards 2017 - website

•  Best News Image - Winner: Matthew Growcott, Win News Tasmania: Moonah Siege
•  Arts Reporting - Winner: Rick Eaves, ABC News Online: Body of Work
•  Science, Environment and Health - Winner: Felicity Ogilvie, ABC Radio AM: Body of Work
•  Best Sports Coverage - Winner: Brent Costelloe, WIN Television: Body of Work
•  Mental Health Reporting - Winner: Tamara McDonald, The Examiner: Body of Work
•  Comment and Analysis - Winner: Sally Glaetzer, The Mercury/Tas Weekend: Body of Work
•  Excellence in Legal Reporting - Winner: Michael Aitkin – ABC TV & News Online: Child Abuse Commission-Body of Work
•  Best Feature, Documentary or Current Affairs - Winner: Sally Glaetzer, TAS Weekend: Port Arthur Massacre Anniversary Coverage
•  Best News Story - Winner: Richard Baines, ABC: Letting the Most vulnerable down- Tasmania’s child protection woes
•  Best New Journalist - Winner: Michelle Wisbey, The Examiner : Body of Work
•  Keith Welsh Award for Outstanding Contribution to Journalism - Winner: Chris Wisbey, ABC
•  Journalist of the Year – Winner: Richard Bains, ABC

ABC: Tasmanian Media Awards: ABC wins six out of 12 gongs; Richard Baines takes out Journalist of the Year

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