Books

Tasmanian Writers’ Centre: July Upcoming Events & Programs

Chris Gallagher Director Tasmania Writers Centre
04.07.17 2:53 pm

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June has been a wonderful month as we celebrated with the young writers in Glenorchy at the Moonah Arts Centre. On a chilly solstice night six young writers read from the work created through their residencies in the Glenorchy area during autumn, and we were so proud to see them all complete this journey by taking the courageous step of presenting their work to an audience. We were also thrilled to announce the Emerging Tasmanian Aboriginal Writers Award thanks to a grant from Festivals Australia and I was delighted to join one of our esteemed judges Bruce Pascoe for interview on the ABC to discuss the importance of the award. Bruce made the insightful comment that the Tasmanian Aboriginal story is important to our National story not just to Tasmania. Also in June we offered a sell-out Masterclass with Benjamin Law the feedback from the day has been overwhelmingly positive.

Of course July offers another great range of writerly activity…the festival program is close to completion, so stay tuned as we gear up for some exciting announcements planned throughout this month. The next Writers Journey workshop with James Dryburgh promises many treasures for fiction and non-fiction writers … the essay is one of the simplest forms of written communication and one of the best ways to air important ideas and share experiences and people with the wider world. For those of you who came to see Caroline Brothers in conversation with James Dryburgh at the start of June you’d have a sense of his worldly experience and capacity to make complex discussion interesting and relatable. Our evening at Hadley’s with the Seasonal Poets is always a great treat. This month we have three hugely respected poets: Kristen Lang, Peter Hay and Louise Oxley. And of course across the state our fantastic local bookshops are presenting another line up of new book launches - So no excuses…happy writing and reading and enjoy the month ahead! 

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Transportation Press: Who won Smoke One?

Transportation Press
02.07.17 5:59 pm

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Smoke, our first international microfiction competition received over 100 entries from around the world. The brief was to write a story in 320 words or less that can be read in the time it takes to smoke a cigarette. No theme. We would like to thank all of the writers who polished their work and sent in stories and we’re delighted to share the winning and the highly commended authors below, and to invite you to the launch of a collection of the best work which is also available to order here.

We received entries from diverse geographies - including Germany, Nottingham, Greece, the United States, mainland Australia and Tasmania. Adam Ouston judged the work ‘blind’, without knowing who wrote each story and we are delighted to see a number of writers we have previously published in the mix.

We will be releasing a limited edition of these stories, printed on good quality loose leaf paper. You can place an order for your copy here: http://transportationpress.bigcartel.com/product/smoke-one-collection-print.  They are also available electronically: http://transportationpress.bigcartel.com/product/smoke-one-collection-e-copy
 
First prize -
Dalian Blood Futures by Daniel Young
Runners Up
Zoo by Robbie Arnott
and
What is a Hornet by Patrick Lenton

Highly Commendeds
A Transformation by Peter Timms
A World by Jasmine Searle
Lights That Never Go Out by Akis Papantonis
Green by Miriam McGarry
Wishful Thinking by Susan Lloy
Hope Floats by Madeleine Habib
The Expert by Ben Walter
Every Story is a Detective Story by Bella Li
Chasing A Cairo Coffee by Kali Myers
Connect and Divide by Bel Woods
Letter to Genghis by Konrad Muller
Eyelashes by Tania Marlowe
Choked by Matt G Turpin
Do You Mind If (after AW & SB) by Stuart Barnes
Antlers by Andrew Harper
Touch Me Not by Cam Daeng
Oh My Dear Twilight Sparkle How I Love You by Victor Medrano-Bonilla
A Great Weight by Michael Louis Kennedy
 
Join us for the launch of Smoke One, Transportation Press’ first collection of the best work from our international microfiction competition. Grab a drink, listen to some of the best work read by the writers and meet the judge, Adam Ouston and the rest of the Transportation Crew including Tadhg Muller, in Tasmania for only a short time. Please RSVP via the Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1556199234393067/

The collection, printed on gorgeous quality looseleaf paper will be available for purchase. You can order a copy now: http://transportationpress.bigcartel.com/

The competition was generously sponsored by Fullers Bookshop: https://www.fullersbookshop.com.au/

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Flit is a fringe literary festival happening in Hobart this September. It brings energy into darker, lesser known lit spaces of the world and has a general policy of inclusion.
We would love to consider your work and we will do our best to accommodate it.Other voices, rock and roll, ancient poetry slammed now, lit stand up. We want you, pitch an idea, if we love it we’ll help you find a space and pop you in the program.

Let us know what you’ve got either by completing this form: https://transportationpress.wufoo.com/forms/qxbnh241f3fr6v/

or emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Grace-ful Techiques

Paula Xiberras
28.06.17 5:10 am

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‘Need You Dead’ is the 13th Roy Grace novel by Peter James, following the crime solving skills of the detective superintendent.

The central story of the novel is that of Lorna Belling, a woman who wants to escape her unhappy marriage for someone who she thinks is her ideal man. When her plans don’t work out she becomes the victim in Roy Grace’s latest case. With many twists, turns and the occasional red herring the solving of the crime keeps you guessing to the final pages. Peter James has once again delivered a novel of grace-ful technique. A technique born of rigorous research as we discussed when I talked to Peter recently.

Peters foray into crime fiction occurred after he himself experienced a robbery. Peter became friends with the investigating police officer eventually going on to form a collaboration with that same officer to write authentic crime stories informed by working police officers. Peter tells me he has accompanied police in his native England to many cases. These situations are always handled with the utmost discretion in that Peter will only attend the scene on the acceptance of those involved. Peter has seen first-hand how police faced with the most sensitive situations must still remain utterly professional in fulfilling required duties. Not only has Peter attended cases in England but also accompanied police on their rounds in Melbourne, Sydney and Perth.

As noted, Peter informs from inside experience, some of the extraordinary tactics police employ in solving a crime.

One of the most astonishing aids police use in solving a crime and one which is used in the new novel is the role of the superior recogniser. The superior recogniser is a real life super hero with extraordinarily higher honed ability to recognise people from just a casual/awkward glimpse. Peter tells me that the superior recogniser’s ability might be attributed to the residual remnants of a primitive skill that developed from a survival instinct that allowed recognition of enemies from afar or in difficult circumstances. Today in situations when the images of the person are limited.

In the novel Peter also explains some more interesting observational skills of how to know when someone is lying but he adds it may not be the best skill for couples to perfect as it might cause disharmony and suspicion in the relationship.

Peter writes an informed and intelligent twist to the crime thriller and invites us in to the inner workings of a profession that demands a deep understanding of the human psyche.

‘Need You Dead’ by Peter James is out now published by Pan Macmillan.

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New book ‘The Crying Years’ provides a unique pictorial look at The Great War

NLA Publishing
26.06.17 4:51 pm

The Great War of 1914–1918 affected all Australians and decisively changed the new nation. They were the ‘Crying Years’ according to writer Zora Cross, who lost her brother in 1917.

In the new book The Crying Years: Australia’s Great War (NLA Publishing, August, $44.99), award-winning historian Peter Stanley has compiled a unique visual history of the era, which weaves a compelling narrative around many striking, never-before-seen images.

Using documents, photographs, artefacts and images from the National Library’s collection, Stanley connects the war overseas—the well-chronicled battles at Gallipoli, Fromelles, Passchendaele and Villers-Bretonneux—with the equally bitter war at home, for and against conscription, over ‘loyalty’ and ‘disloyalty’. Men faced life-changing choices: volunteer to fight or stay at home; join the revolutionary unionists or break the strikes. Women bore the burdens of waiting and worrying, of working for charities or of voting to send men to their deaths. Even children were drawn into the animosities, as communities fractured under the stress. Engaging and accessibly written, The Crying Years evokes the drama, tragedy, suffering and sacrifice of Australia’s Great War and its lingering aftermath.

Author Peter Stanley is a Research Professor at UNSW Canberra. He is one of Australia’s most active military social historians and the author of over 30 books, many dealing with Australia’s Great War. He was formerly Principal Historian at the Australian War Memorial, was jointly awarded the Prime Minister’s Prize for Australian History (in 2011) and is the current President of Honest History.

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The Talk of The Town and Country

Paula Xiberras
24.06.17 5:48 am

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Rachael began her romance with romance when she wrote the story of her break up with her primary school sweetheart, which caused her to write an eight thousand word tome containing everything she and her love said to each other, Rachael suggests this might have been a bit boring to readers but her love for writing romance did not wane and after time teaching she completed a creative writing degree and subsequently began writing romantic fiction.

I spoke to Rachael recently and she told me she has many fans on her face book site from Tasmania and a visit to how state is high on her priorities and may happen in November to coincide with the publication of her latest book.

At the moment Rachael is on the publicity trail for her most recent book ‘Talk of the town’ and that is the book we have organised to set up a chat about.

The novel is the story of Lawson Cooper Jones, his young son Ned and their farm. Lawson has lost his wife and despite the efforts to rustle up some romance by local girl Adeline Walsh he is not ready for another relationship.  That is until the novels other protagonist the lovely Meg arrives at Rose Hill. Meg however is a complicated girl running away from a difficult past and setting up home in the town’s deserted general store. Meg is also not looking for a relationship but Lawson’s son Ned has other ideas immediately warming to Meg and encouraging his dad to form a friendship with her. The jealous Adeline, not keen on the blossoming relationship in Rose Hill does a bit of investigating and what she discovers could destroy the burgeoning relationship.


Some of ‘Talk of the Towns’ inspiration was gathered from Rachel asking her face book readers if they believed in ghosts, of which the majority of those surveyed replied they did. The possibility of ghosts is incorporated into the story with her heroine Meg experiencing a paranormal presence.


Rachael has taken a risk in creating a heroine who isn’t perfect, as the usual criteria for a romantic heroine is they be a sympathetic character to ensure reader engagement. Yet, Rachael has given us a very real and identifiable character for readers in the lovely Meg, a young woman who has suffered tragedy and because of it been on a downward spiral, resulting in making mistakes and learning from them,

Rachael believes romance fiction is popular because it allows readers to escape to a different environment where community is important and supportive. Rachael says even a 26 year old bloke from Julia Creek said he loved the romance in her books.

‘The Talk of the Town’ is out now published by Harlequin

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Fullers Bookshop Manager Catherine Schulz Wins ABA Bookseller of the Year 2017 ...

Adam Ousten. Fullers Bookshop
23.06.17 4:43 am

Following Hobart-based Fullers Bookshop’s win of the prestigious Independent Bookshop of the Year Award in March this year, manager of Fullers, Catherine Schulz, won the Australian Booksellers Association (ABA) Bookseller of the Year Award at the national ABA conference gala dinner last Sunday night.

Catherine began working at Fullers in 1990 and has been instrumental in turning it into one of the nation’s leading bookshops. She has been active in supporting her industry, from the smallest of Tasmanian micropublishers through to the industry bodies that formulate policy and programming for Australian independent booksellers. One recommendation from Catherine can create a local bestseller.

From a shortlist of six of the nation’s best booksellers from bookshops in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, representatives from the ABA chose Schulz for the award. Colleague Tim Jarvis, a relative newcomer to the Fullers team, was shortlisted for the Young Bookseller of the Year Award.

Nomination Form/Guidelines for the Award here: https://ababooksellers.wufoo.com/forms/zviifgz1m4u6tn/

More information here: https://www.booksandpublishing.com.au/articles/2017/06/02/91432/aba-booksellers-of-the-year-2017-finalists-announced/

Fullers Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/194892544352349/

Fullers website: http://www.fullersbookshop.com.au

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When A Turdball meets a Dunny ...

An opponent of the Carmichael Mine*
22.06.17 7:12 am

When a Turdball
meets a Dunny
It might feel moved to
dump our money
please, don’t laugh,
this is not funny
a Turdball lives
where it’s not sunny
it is a Turdball
not a Trump
it has its head inside
our rump

Now every one of us
must admit
when we consume
we have to shit
a Dunny’s vision
to build a latrine
the like of which
has never been seen
sending its runoff
through the Reef
must seem like heaven
to our chief
for would prioritise
the scatological
far above
the ecological
If you were a Turdball
it might seem,
compared to you that
coal is clean.

Now the pollies
of this nation
all avoid
financial constipation
(in fact a course of
political colonics
might vastly improve
our economics)
Flush away
what blocks the sense
in what we call
parliament
Then we might hope
for our national brain
to chooses a future
that is sane:

All that desert, all that sun
Wow! it doesn’t shine out of our bum!
We could turn the country solar
slow the melting of the polar
ice, the rising seas,
Climate change catastrophes
like bush fires, once prevented
are a whole lot less expensive!
Not just Turdball but even wee
might earn a place in history!

*An opponent of the Carmichael Mine is known to the Editor

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Hobart Bookshop: Monica McInerney’s launch of ‘The Trip of a Lifetime’

Hobart Bookshop
20.06.17 2:27 pm

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Hobart Bookshop:  Launch of Swallows Fly North

Lucinda Sharp Director, FORTY SOUTH PUBLISHING Pty Ltd
20.06.17 2:21 pm

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Forty South Publishing is launching a book called Swallows Fly North, A Tasmanian Tale, written by GPCapt Al McKay (retired) on Thursday 29 June at Hobart Bookshop.

The book will be launched by Tony Fraser, Director of Sports Recovery and Business Development, Soldier On Australia in the presence of the Governor, Her Excellency Professor the Honourable Kate Warner AC.

The author (born at Koonya on the Tasman Peninsula during the Great Depression, now living in Sydney) is donating his income from sales to Soldier On Australia which is currently working to establish a presence in Tasmania.

We would be delighted if you could attend and show support for Soldier On Australia - supporting Australia’s service men and women by focusing on their physical and mental health, their family, their community, and their future http://www.soldieron.org.au

 

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Black Inc & Nero: July – New Releases

Black Inc. and Nero
15.06.17 2:39 pm

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Tasmanian Writers’ Centre: Inaugural Emerging Tasmanian Indigenous Writers Award

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
14.06.17 4:14 pm

The Tasmanian Writers’ Centre is delighted to announce the inaugural Emerging Tasmanian Indigenous Writers Award as part of 2017 Hidden Stories and the 2017 Tasmanian Writers & Readers Festival.

Tasmanian Elders, Dr Patsy Cameron and puralia meenamatta (Jim Everett) said they are thrilled to see this new writing award established.  “It will offer emerging Tasmanian Indigenous writers the vital support they need to establish their voices as upcoming Tasmanian writers,” puralia meenamatta said.

This award is open to all emerging Tasmanian Indigenous writers aged 16 and over. Entries can be: a selection of poems or songs, a selection of short fiction or non-fiction (essay, autobiographical or biographical work), an excerpt from a play, illustrated stories, etc. All entries must be approximately 2,000 - 2,500 words for prose or scripts or 80 – 100 lines of poetry or song lyrics.

To be eligible, writers must not have had more than one full-length work* published by a third-party publisher, or one full-length play script produced by a professional theatre company. (* A full-length work may be a novel, graphic novel, play script, book-length work of literary non-fiction, or a collection of short stories, literary non-fiction essays or poems.)

The award is open from 15 June and entries are due by COB on Monday 31 July.

Awards will be presented on the evening of Thursday 14 September 2017 alongside the Tasmanian Premier’s Literary Prize Shortlist announcements at the Tasmanian Writers & Readers Festival Opening Night event.

The award includes prize money totaling $1,200 to be awarded at the discretion of the judges and professional support via membership to the Tasmanian Writers Centre.

Please visit the Tasmanian Writers Centre website ( http://www.taswriters.org/our-program/emerging-tasmanian-indigenous-writers-award ) to download an entry form or visit our office at the Tasmanian Writers Centre.

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The secrets to positive thinking ...

Brolga Publishing
14.06.17 4:07 pm

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New book follows laughter therapist’s journey with bowel cancer and the secrets to positive thinking

Released to coincide with Bowel Cancer Awareness month, author and Laughter Therapist Ros Ben-Moshe details her own personal story with what she calls ‘the little c’ in her new book Laughing at cancer.

With a healthy lifestyle, happy family, and career success, Ros Ben-Moshe had no plans for a tumour to take over her life. Yet, after the news came on the 43rd birthday, celebrations turned into medical appointments, hours of surgery and the loss of casual conversations. Laughing at cancer (Brolga Publishing RRP: $24.95) is brimming with humour, insight and sensitivity.

This honest and insightful book acts as both a memoir of her journey and a healing guide for anyone with a significant health issue. Ben-Moshe explores the secrets behind the power of laughter and the impact the important tools of laughter and positive thinking have on heath recovery, as well as our everyday lives.

This book will change how you view illness, and show how changing your mindset can do wonders on the journey to health.

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Aurora House: Flames of Rebellion ...

Aurora House
13.06.17 6:55 am

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Losing Streak review: James Boyce on the murky story of gambling in Tasmania

Fairfax
11.06.17 6:08 am

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The damage that one-armed bandits do is well documented, the ripple effect of pokie addiction spreading beyond the individual problem gambler to their families and society. It’s a nationwide problem, James Boyce pointing out that last year the Victorian government took $1.1 billion in pokies tax, but the focus of his eye-opening investigation is Tasmania. And what a tale, one that could be the subject of a novel, Boyce taking the reader into the murky world of big business and politics, shady deals, monopoly controls, north-south rivalries and allegations of bribery and corruption. But it’s not all grubby. David Walsh, former professional gambler and founder of MONA, makes a wild card entry into the story and the debate over pokies. Boyce ends on a positive note, saying Tasmania is well placed to end the one-armed dictatorship.

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Kim’s Quality Cooking

Paula Xiberras
08.06.17 6:24 am

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It seems appropriate that Kim McCosker of ‘Four ingredients’ fame should have begun her career in finance.

Finance involves identifying and finding solutions to problems; Kim, as a busy, not to mention tired, working mum recognised the problem of putting together a meal each evening but found when she consulted her cook books the recipes were way too elaborate and time consuming.

When one evening a recipe called for a ‘spatchcock’ it was the last straw for Kim. Creating an evening meal had to be easier than delving into dictionaries to define ingredients. So was born the idea of four ingredients, simple delicious and easy to prepare meals from just four ingredients.
which for your information is ‘a game bird, split and ready for grilling’. No obscure list of ingredients as professed by such gastric gods as Jamie Oliver and Nigella.

When Kim first came up with her idea and contacted potential publishers she was initially turned away as no-one was willing to work with an unknown albeit revolutionary cook. Kim took on the marketing responsibilities herself calling shops as a consumer asking if they stocked the four ingredients book and going house to house with copies of her book for other tired workers as they returned home.

Kim’s ‘four ingredients’ have branched out to include versions for diabetics, gluten intolerant and other dietary requirements with a version for pets planned.

As a farmer’s daughter Kim tells me she never forgets to thank those who have joined her to transmit her message. Kim tells me she was informed by one or her readers that her recipe cards were available at their local Tassie IGA.

With a strong commitment to supporting farmers and their produce Kim was quick to call the IGA and thank them for their support. Kim also enjoys sharing her ideas on social media. Her wish to stand out with her attention to detail and always going the extra mile, manifested she tells me in taking a plate of cakes along to every interview she attends, most recently on studio 10.

It was at Studio 10 Kim was questioned by a lady who said she had been afraid to attempt chicken satay but now with the four ingredients approach didn’t find it so daunting, in fact she was ready to create her own variation of the recipe.

When I tell Kim her four ingredient pudding is one of my favourite recipes, she encourages me to go a step further including croissants as the bread base and adding some white chocolate … a combination she says, that is not to be indulged in to every day! Having tried Kim’s deserts I can only say the proof is indeed in the pudding!
Kim’s latest book ‘Ten Years In’ is out now …

http://www.4ingredients.com.au/product/ten-years-4-ingredients-story

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Poetry: Under the Yellow Moon

Christopher Nagle
08.06.17 5:28 am

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Marian Rennie’s website here

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From real Estates to Real estate

Paula Xiberras
08.06.17 4:45 am

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Rosemary Peterswald has made the journey not just from Ireland to Australia but from living in real estates, in the form of big houses and a castle in Ireland, to working in real estate here in Tasmania.

We might claim Rosemary as a Tasmanian even though she no longer lives here. Her family’s legacy continues in the form of Charlotte Peterswald.Real Estate. Presently, Rosemary and her husband sail around the world writing about seafood and wine and the places they dine! I caught up with Rosemary to have a chat about her autobiography ‘Can my Pony Come Too?’  which recounts her early childhood in Ireland and subsequent immigration to Australia and later Tasmania.

Rosemary known as ‘teeny’ to her family, owing to her fifth child status in the family, was familiar with Glendalough, in her home of Wicklow Ireland. Glendalough is the place of St Kevin’s monastic settlement and the famous rock called St Kevin’s chair, where it is said by sitting on it you can cure illness.

In her book Rosemary visits some of the pivotal places of her childhood including paying a visit to Haughton Castle once owned by Rosemary’s family, the Esmonde’s. She meets its colourful inhabitant, a lady who is one of the few people who can boast she conversed with both WB Yeats and Mick Jagger when they stayed at the castle. The castle is also famous for its celebrities of another era in the form of ghosts including the first wife of Lord Esmonde,  Ailish O’Flaherty who was the granddaughter of Ireland’s pirate Queen, Grace O’Malley. The ghost of Ailish appear in section of the castle that she stood to wait for her husband’s return from war.

Far away from this fairy tale world, Rosemary and her family set up life in Australia with characteristic resourcefulness that saw them take on a number of different jobs , however, perhaps the most difficult job was probably coping with the snakes and bats in Australia, the former of course unknown in Ireland!

An additional difficulty was adapting to the peculiarities of their new land. Rosemary recounts some examples of her mum’s grappling with the language such as being asked to ‘bring a plate’ to an evening out and doing so quite literally but an empty one! On being asked by a neighbour to take care of the children and ‘hoping they don’t get in the road’ Rosemary’s mum was quick to answer that she always kept a keen eye on them and they wouldn’t ‘get out on to the road’.

Rosemary met her husband through her Duntroon trained brother. After marriage Rosemary and Rob were posted to New Guinea. After returning to Australia a casual meeting encouraged them to move to Tasmania where they set up an apple farm. This produced its own apple anecdotes such as the time a representative of the Jewish community on the mainland interested in purchasing some apples came to observe the farm. Fortunately he nodded off during the visit and didn’t see the pigs interacting with the apples!

Later on Rosemary and Rob entered another career change, this time real estate in the form of Peterswald. Eventually it was time for this eclectic couple to explore new horizons, literally, as they began sailing Australian and international waters, experiencing the cultural, seafood and wine resulting in a number of coffee table books.

Tasmania still holds a special place in Rosemary’s heart hence her launching her autobiography here.

‘Can the pony come too!’ is out now published by Ballynastragh Books.

You can read more about Rosemary here

http://ballynastraghbooks.com.au/index.php/about-rob-and-rosemary-peterswald

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New Australian novel with a very real moral dilemma

Austin Macauley
07.06.17 1:39 pm

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David Finchley, a semi-retired neurologist, is no stranger to writing. After the success of his previous novels Switch and The Gold Standard, comes his best work to date. Prang (Austin Macauley rrp: $23.99) is an enthralling novel which will leave you wondering how you would react to a very real moral dilemma.

Born into a poor, working class family, Mac has worked hard and has almost everything he would want: a happy marriage, a successful career and the prospect of a vast inheritance. What could possibly go wrong?

Driving home from the dealers in his new car a minor collision, a small prang, sets in motion a chain of events that threatens everything he holds dear as a face he hasn’t seen for over twenty years brings back memories of the one mistake he’d rather forget.

Prang is a thrilling read which sets about a moral dilemma that will leave you on the edge of your seat until the final few pages and available now online and in good book stores.

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Moonah Arts Centre: Young Writers in the City of Glenorchy Launch

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
06.06.17 2:42 pm

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Thursday 22 June 2017 |  5.30 for 6.00pm |  Moonah Arts Centre, 23-27 Albert Road Moonah 7009

The work developed by the 2017 Young Writers in the City of Glenorchy residents will be launched at the Moonah Arts Centre. We invite all local and visiting community members to join us as we celebrate the residents’ endeavors.

Earlier this year the Tasmanian Writers Centre, in partnership with the Moonah Arts Centre and Glenorchy City Council, launched its Young Writers in the City residency. This is the first time that Young Writers in the City has taken place in the City of Glenorchy.

The Young Writers in the City program is a unique opportunity that provides young writers a structured and paid writing program to develop new work while also making an important artistic contribution to the municipality in which the program takes place. Six young writers-in-residence have each been commissioned to create experimental essays inspired by the various spaces and venues they have selected across Glenorchy.

On Thursday, 22 June 2017 we will launch the residents’ works at the Moonah Arts Centre. We invite all community members to join us as we celebrate the endeavors of our residents.

The 2017 Glenorchy residents include: Lily Bennett (venue: Northgate and surrounds), Vivienne Cutbush (venue: GASP), Kate Dewar (venue: Migrant Resource Centre), Elissa Evans (venue: MONA), Zara Gudnason (venue: MR-1 Fast Ferry), and Laura Hilton (venue: Magnolia 73 Café)

For further details on The Young Writers in the City of Glenorchy, please visit the Tasmanian Writers Centre website:

https://www.taswriters.org/young-writers-city-glenorchy/

The residents’ finished works will be published online.

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Black Inc & Nero: August new releases ...

Black Inc. and Nero
06.06.17 1:09 pm

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From Fear to Fascination – Learning to Love Spiders ...

Brian Johnson, CSIRO publishing
06.06.17 12:58 pm

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Much maligned and misunderstood, the spiders of Australia are among some of the most amazing creatures on the planet. Beyond our fear of commonly known Funnelwebs and Redbacks, are the likes of the Sparklemuffins, the Alien Butt Spider, the Disco Mirror Ball Spiders, and the dancing Peacock Spiders.

A new publication from CSIRO Publishing, A Field Guide to Spiders of Australia by Robert Whyte and Greg Anderson, delivers the most comprehensive guide ever published, including 1350 stunning colour photographs and covering 836 species.

“It can take as little as five minutes to completely cure arachnophobia” says author Robert Whyte, an honorary spider research scientist at Queensland Museum. “For years now we have been curing arachnophobia with the harmless Golden Orb Weaver, which doesn’t even have a defensive bite.”

Unsurprisingly, there are plenty of myths surrounding spiders, including the recurring falsehood that bites from White-tailed spiders will trigger flesh-eating bacteria. A Field Guide to Spiders of Australia dispels those myths (the dangers of spiders are mostly bogus) and showcases just how fascinating, beautiful and clever Australian spiders really are. Covering in detail 86 spider families, and 836 species it will help you identify more spider species than ever before and transform your fear into fascination.

OUR LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIP

• Spiders are an indicator of ecosystem health. Advances in science are also turning spider venoms into lifesavers for humans, with applications being developed to treat cancers and strokes.

• No-one has actually died from a spider bite in Australia for more than 30-years, but plenty of people have been injured panicking at the sight of a Huntsman!

• Some spiders are just as beautiful as butterflies. An Australian Peacock Spider with a furry blue face, the Maratus personatus was named “the World’s cutest spider”!

• Spiders can do incredible things – some spiders can fly; others mimic other species like ants and wasps to avoid predators; and Disco-mirror ball spiders can rapidly change colour.

A Field Guide to the Spiders of Australia is full of stunning facts and images with countless new species identified for the first time. These are not just Australian firsts, but world firsts.

“Read no further – unless you are willing to fall in love with spiders. Submitting to the pages that follow could change your life…”

Tim Low, excerpt from the Foreword, A Field Guide to Spiders of Australia

About the Authors:

Robert Whyte is an honorary researcher in arachnology at the Queensland Museum in Brisbane.

Greg Anderson is a biomedical research scientist at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute.

A Field Guide to Spiders of Australia by Robert Whyte & Greg Anderson
Released: June 1st $49.95 PB 464 pp ISBN: 9780643107076

http://www.publish.csiro.au/book/6899

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‘The Pacific Room’ the debut novel from Michael Fitzgerald

Transit Lounge
02.06.17 7:27 pm

Michael Fitzgerald’s debut novel The Pacific Room (Transit Lounge $29.95) tells of the last days of Tusitala, ‘the teller of tales’, as Robert Louis Stevenson became known in Samoa where he chose to die. In 1892 Girolamo Nerli travels from Sydney by steamer to Apia, with the intention of capturing something of Jekyll and Hyde in his portrait of the famous author. Nerli’s presence sets in train a disturbing sequence of events. More than a century later, art historian Lewis Wakefield comes to Samoa to research the painting of Tusitala’s portrait by the long-forgotten Italian artist.

On hiatus from his bipolar medication, Lewis is freed to confront the powerful reality of all the desires and demons that R. L. Stevenson couldn’t control. Lewis’s personal journey is shadowed by the story of the lovable Teuila, a so-called fa‘afafine (‘in the manner of a woman’), and the spirit of Stevenson’s servant boy, Sosimo. Set in an evocative tropical landscape haunted by the lives and spirits which drift across it, The Pacific Room is both a love letter to Samoa and a lush and tender exploration of artistic creation, of secret passions and merging dualities.

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Tasmanian Writers’ Centre: This month in writing ...

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
01.06.17 4:46 pm

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Tasmanian Writers Centre here

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Fullers, June 2, 5.30pm: A Slow Childhood: Notes on Thoughtful Parenting

Adam Ousten
01.06.17 4:31 pm

Helen Hayward in conversation with Kyia Clayton to launch A Slow Childhood: Notes on Thoughtful Parenting at Fullers Bookshop this Friday June 2, 5.30pm

A Slow Childhood: Notes on Thoughtful Parenting
by Helen Hayward

Not enough is written about the sort of limbo a parent lives in between their own ambitions and the demands of family life, but Hobart-based author, Helen Hayward, has dived in headfirst. This is a very revealing, honest account of parenting in which Hayward shares lessons from everyday life, the sacrifices, the tussles, the rewards.

Come along for a discussion of finding balance between parenting and wanting one’s own life.

Helen Hayward will be in conversation with Kyia Clayton, Director of the Tasmanian Film Festival, at Fullers Bookshop, this Friday, June 2 at 5.30pm.

Helen Hayward is a freelance writer living in Hobart. She taught in universities and trained in psychotherapy in the UK, leading to her first book Never Marry a Girl With a Dead Father. Her most recent work is The School of Life website, Food As Therapy, and For the Love of Food: Stories and recipes from extraordinary Tasmanians ( http://www.haywardhelen.com.au/love_of_food.html ) and in 2017 her memoir of family life, A Slow Childhood. Homework, her current project, based on 50 interviews, is about the value of domestic life.

Event @ Fullers Bookshop website: https://www.fullersbookshop.com.au/event/slow-childhood-notes-thoughtful-parenting/

Fullers Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/411488559233894/

Publisher website (features image): https://www.newsouthbooks.com.au/books/slow-childhood/

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Adam Ouston
Fullers Bookshop Hobart
Tasmanian Independent Bookseller of the Year 2002-2014
Australian Bookseller of the Year 2002
131 Collins Street Hobart TAS 7000
03 6234 3800
http://www.fullersbookshop.com.au

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Transit Lounge: New travel memoir ‘Tell it To The Dog’ from writer Robert Power

Transit Lounge
01.06.17 4:00 pm

New travel memoir ‘Tell it To The Dog’ from writer Robert Power

Tell it to the Dog (Transit Lounge $29.95, July 2017), is a captivating memoir that is playful, heartbreaking and affirming. From a Dublin childhood to London, then on to Europe, to Asia and Australia, there is a deep engagement with the world in this book about growing up, about human and animal connectedness, about friendship, love and loss. Author Robert Power (In Search of the Blue Tiger, Meatloaf in Manhattan) understands the uncanniness and endurance of memory.

He can make us laugh, and then stop us in our tracks at the profundity of this business of meeting life. Each of these short chapters is beautifully complete; together the whole thing shimmers. In the most delightful and subtle of ways, the language, trajectory and wisdom of Tell it to the Dog underscores our need to embrace our own vulnerabilities, to confront our experiences and memories, and to believe as Jane Austen once wrote, that ‘when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure’.

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Fleur’s family focus

Paula Xiberras
01.06.17 5:52 am

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Fleur McDonald’s latest novel is a departure from rural romance. ‘The missing pieces of us’ is a novel of suburbia about family.

At the heart of the novel is Lauren Ramsey, a dedicated teacher and a mother. The novel introduces us to Lauren, who at the time has concerns about one of her students, a little boy who arrives at school with bruises.

The first thought is that the little boy may have been ill-treated. Fleur shows us that we are all part of the human family who care for each other, related or not; however there is a danger that Lauren’s concentration on the little boy could be causing her to neglect her own daughter who is reaching the precarious teenage years when she needs her mother the most.

A young woman Tamara, who has had a difficult childhood and provides a link between Lauren and her daughter Skye.  Lauren, who has had skin cancer in the past, is diagnosed with another bout of the condition, this time a more serious one which leads her to consider delving into her family history, difficult because she was adopted.

Fleur as well as being an accomplished author has set up a non-profit organisation aiming to break the silence on domestic violence, a topic she has covered in previous writing.

‘The missing pieces of us’ is out now published by Allen and Unwin.

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ANIMAL ECO-WARRIORS - Meet the Extraordinary Animals Protecting Our World ...

Brian Johnson, CSIRO publishing
31.05.17 11:16 am

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Nic Gill, above grew up in Tasmania, on a small farm with a large number of animals and now lives in Hobart. When she’s not writing books, she’s helping people to care for their local natural environments.  She was bitten by an impressive array of animals while researching this book. 

 

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Moonah Arts Centre, TODAY: Update to the Milestones event with Caroline Brothers

Chris Gallagher, CEO Tasmanian Writers Centre
30.05.17 7:00 am

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Caroline Brothers

Update to the Milestones event with Caroline Brothers.

Unfortunately, due to some unforeseen circumstances, we have had to alter our programming.

Below are the updated details for the event on 30 May:

Milestones will now feature only Caroline Brothers in conversation with James Dryburgh followed by Q&A.

7.00pm for 7.30pm start (drinks available at the bar and book signing available from 7.00pm)

Tickets: $15 ($10 concession / TWC members) Book Here

Venue: Moonah Arts Centre, Albert Road, Moonah

As a former New York Times correspondent, Caroline has covered events in South America and worldwide. She has made the transition to novelist, using her profound knowledge of true events as the springboard to explore political and social issues in fiction.

Caroline’s latest novel, The Memory Stones, tells the story of the Disappeared, thousands of Argentinians who fell victim to the violence of the late 1970s. Depicting the despair and hope of one family as it seeks to rebuild after unimaginable loss, it is a devastating portrait of a country that has come face to face with terror, and the long, dark shadow it leaves behind.

A particularly poignant story in today’s world of uncertainty, violent regimes, challenges to democracy and freedom of the press.

Tuesday, 30 May 2017 | 6.30 – 9.00pm
Moonah Arts Centre, 23-27 Albert Road, Moonah TAS

This May 30th, the Tasmanian Writers Centre will present a panel with leading Tasmanian voices followed by a talk with former New York Times correspondent Caroline Brothers.

Milestones is an event presented by the Tasmanian Writers Centre in collaboration with Recognise Tasmania and the Moonah Arts Centre. Tickets are $25 ($20 Concession) and are available through the Tasmanian Writers Centre website: https://www.taswriters.org/events/milestones-caroline-brothers-recognise-tasmania/

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Aurora House: Flames of Rebellion ...

Aurora House
29.05.17 2:45 pm

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More here

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Fire ... !

Christopher Nagle
28.05.17 2:27 pm

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My wife is running a pop up art show in Melbourne showing the work of three women, ‘Las Amigas’, one of whom is Marian Therese Rennie from Acheron, near Eildon Wier.

The Painting, ‘Fire’ is in memory of Black Saturday in 2009. I was inspired to write a poem to accompany it ... 

Flaming up
The searing surf rolls through
To plunge and rise again
In arching pain
Which crisps and crackles
Roars in raging thirst
Drinks and sucks the life it burns
Flaying flesh to naked ash
As living trees writhe and crash
Crisped to blackened wisps
That rise in glowing spumes
Of shimmering wind and fumes
Borne streaming screaming howling
To the starless night
Above the super heated storm.

 

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