Books

Black Inc. Nero: August new books ...

Black Inc, Nero
25.05.16 3:37 pm

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Neighbourhood Houses celebrate National Simultaneous Storytime 11am 25th May 2016

Steve Cooke (Everyday Literacy for Local Communities Project Officer) Media Release
25.05.16 2:29 pm

Today, Tasmania’s Neighbourhood House network is celebrating the National Simultaneous Storytime.  At 28 locations around Tasmania over 710 children, and their parents and carers, will be gathering to read and have fun with the staff and volunteers at Neighbourhood Houses.

Neighbourhood Houses Tasmania represents the 35 Neighbourhood Houses bringing communities together in low socio economic or isolated communities across Tasmania – from Geeveston to Zeehan, Clarendon Vale to Fingal Valley.  To truly understand the great work and community change happening through our network please see our recent publication “Our Stories” on our website at this link Our Stories. 

The National Simultaneous Storytime is an Australia-wide initiative of the Australian Library and Information Association (https://www.alia.org.au/nss).  National Simultaneous Storytime is an annual campaign that aims to encourage more young Australians to read and enjoy books. Now in its 16th successful year, it is a colourful, vibrant, fun event that aims to promote the value of reading and literacy, using an Australian children’s book that explores age-appropriate themes. 

“We know that reading to and speaking with our pre-school children are the easiest ways to ensure our children are more likely to have positive outcomes at school, and are ready for a life time of fun with books.  Given all our concerns about outcomes from education in Tasmania we hope this is just the beginning of families falling in love with books and learning, and isn’t it cool that children in families in 28 communities are sharing this moment toegether!” said Steve Cook, NHT’s Everyday Literacy Project Worker.

This year’s book is I Got This Hat.  It was written by Jol and Kate Temple, and illustrated by Jon Foye.  It is the story of a young person who has a lot of hats from a lot of places and from a lot of different people, and sensibly decides to wear none of them to bed.

This year across 28 Neighbourhood Houses more than 710 Tasmanian pre-school children will be joining over 500,000 other children across Australia to read the same story at the the same time.  Each child who participates in the events at Tasmanian Neighbourhood Houses will receive a free book thanks to our funding from Tasmanian Community Fund.

The Neighbourhood Houses involved are:  Beaconsfield; JRS Inc (Bridgewater); Burnie; Clarendon Vale; Deloraine; Derwent Valley (New Norfolk), Devonport; Dorset (Scottsdale); Dowsing Point; Dunalley; Nubeena; JRS Inc (Gagebrook), Fingal; Geeveston; Georgetown; Goodwood; Maranoa Heights (Kingston); Rocherlea; Okines (Dodges Ferry); Pittwater (Midway Point); Risdon Vale; Rosebery; Ulverstone; West Moonah; West Winds (Woodbridge); Zeehan; Ravenswood; and St Helens

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Hobart Bookshop: Elizabeth Leane’s new book, South Pole: Nature and Culture

Hobart Bookshop
05.05.16 5:17 am

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Please join us for the launch of Elizabeth Leane’s new book, South Pole: Nature and Culture.

The book will be launched by Steve Nicol with an introduction by the University of Tasmania’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research), Professor Brigid Heywood.

As one of two points where the Earth’s axis meets its surface, the South Pole should be a precisely defined place. But as Elizabeth Leane shows in this book, conceptually it is a place of paradoxes. An invisible spot on a high, featureless ice plateau, the Pole has no obvious material value, yet it is a highly sought-after location, and reaching it on foot is one of the most extreme adventures an explorer can undertake. The Pole is, as Leane shows, a deeply imagined place, and a place of politics, where a series of national claims converge. 
       
Leane details the important challenges that the South Pole poses to humanity, asking what it can teach us about ourselves and our relationship with our planet. She examines its allure for explorers such as Robert F. Scott and Roald Amundsen, not to mention the myriad writers and artists who have attempted to capture its strange, inhospitable blankness. She considers the Pole’s advantages for climatologists and other scientists as well as the absurdities and banalities of human interaction with this place. Ranging from the present all the way back to the ancient Greeks, she offers a fascinating—and lavishly illustrated—story about one of the strangest and most important places on Earth.

When: 5.30pm, Wednesday May 18th
Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square

Free event, all welcome.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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Black Inc and Nero May new releases ...

Black Inc. and Nero
04.05.16 11:56 am

Here are the May new releases from Black Inc. and Nero.

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Tasmanian Writers’ Centre: May Writing Workshops, Book Launches, Events!

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
02.05.16 6:00 pm

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Writers and publishers voice opposition to new copyright proposals

Jason Steger, Literary Editor, The Age
01.05.16 7:00 am

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Photo: Matt Newton, http://www.matthewnewton.com.au/ . Recent Man Booker Booker Prize winner Richard Flanagan finds it “a despairing time to be an Australian writer”.

<b>The book industry industry has reacted with horror to the Productivity Commission’s interim report into intellectual property, which recommends scrapping parallel-import restrictions on books and the adoption of the US system of “fair use” of copyright material. Authors, publishers and some booksellers are aghast at how the literary ecology would be damaged if the recommendations are enacted.

The situation now is that publishers with local rights must supply books within 14 days of publication or else shops may source books overseas. Advocates argue removal of restrictions will cut prices and accelerate supply. The so-called “fair use” system allows use of some material without payment to copyright holders

Two Australian winners of the Man Booker Prize, Richard Flanagan and Tom Keneally, are both appalled by the prospects of a stripping away of territorial copyright.

“It’s an exciting time to be Malcolm Turnbull but a despairing one to be an Australian writer,” Flanagan said. Expect to see what happened in New Zealand, the only other country credulous enough to adopt such a measure – a collapse in local publishing and the writing it supports.

“Writers receive a total of $2.1 million in federal grants. That’s all. Where’s the innovative economy in destroying your greatest cultural success story that costs the taxpayer a third of a Peter Dutton propaganda movie to deter refugees?”

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Fullers: Unnecessary Wars by Henry Reynolds book launch

Adam Ousten, Fullers Bookshop
27.04.16 6:08 pm

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Unnecessary Wars by Henry Reynolds book launch at Fullers Bookshop, 5:30pm Friday April 29

‘Australian governments find it easy to go to war. Their leaders seem to be able to withdraw with a calm conscience, answerable neither to God nor humanity.’
This is Henry Reynolds at his searing best. In stark detail, he shows how the Boer War left a dark and dangerous legacy, demonstrating how beliefs in an identity crafted around loyalty to Britain have propelled us into too many unnecessary wars – without ever counting the cost.

“The importance of Reynolds’ history is the fact that it seeks to rewrite our very foundations as a nation.”
– Crickey

A pioneering historian, Henry Reynolds is considered one of the nation’s leading authorities on the history of Australia’s Indigenous people.  Henry’s seminal book, The Other Side of the Frontier, published in 1981, was the first to see history from an Aboriginal perspective.  An outspoken public intellectual, Henry was the first academic historian to champion Aboriginal land rights. Fighting for reconciliation at a time when it was not popular, Henry was not deterred by the backlash and his courage, tenacity and commitment inspired a generation of Aboriginal and white Australian activists to persevere in their campaign for Aboriginal land and other rights.  Henry’s oral history project in the 1970s connected him with Eddie Mabo and greatly contributed to the High Court’s recognition of land rights. Henry’s 20-plus books have not only won a string of awards, they have encouraged young historians to embrace Aboriginal history, have enriched the nation’s understanding of our past and have pointed the way to a better future.

Henry will be in conversation with Matt Killingsworth, University of Tasmania Head of Discipline in Politics and International Relations, at Fullers Bookshop. 5.30pm Friday April 29

Fullers Bookshop
(03) 6234 3800
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Fullers: Eat to Cheat Dementia book launch at Fullers Bookshop, 5:30pm Thursday April 28

Adam Ousten, Fullers Bookshop
27.04.16 2:54 pm

New book unravels the complex science behind nutrition and brain health, helping us reduce our chance of cognitive decline and dementia.

Following the barnstorming Eat to Cheat Ageing, dietician Ngaire Hobbins returns with a new book that explains and examines the link between nutrition and brain health, presenting it in her trademark engaging and easy-reading style.

Eat to Cheat Dementia reveals the power of eating to maximise vitality, independence and quality of life for anyone living with a diagnosis of dementia, providing sensible, practical eating solutions for every reader.

http://www.eattocheatdementia.com

“This book is important for every older person, but also for each and every one of us as we relentlessly progress toward old age. We are what we eat.”
– Dr Jane Tolman Clinical Associate Professor Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre

“I commonly see frail elderly people with multiple co-morbidities including dementia, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, heart disease, gait and balance disorders who have associated severe malnutrition. Ngaire’s book is a very practical approach [with] easy steps to eliminate those risks and improve nutrition and health.”

– Peter Lipski Consultant Physician in Geriatric Medicine Director of Geriatric Medicine – Brisbane Waters Private Hospital Conjoint Associate Professor Newcastle University

Ngaire Hobbins is a clinical practitioner and dietician driven by a passion to promote independence and health in older people by averting physical and mental decline that is all too common because of inappropriate food choices. She is an advocate for promoting the joy of eating and the essential place food plays in the health of all older people, whether living independently, being assisted in the community or residing in residential care. Ngaire lives in Australia and is a clinical practitioner, aging wellness consultant, author and lecturer in dementia studies, University of Tasmania, an aged care consultant and seniors’ advocate.

Ngaire will launch this fascinating and important new book at Fullers Bookshop. 5.30pm Thursday April 28

Fullers Bookshop
(03) 6234 3800
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

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Anzac Spirit

Fiona
27.04.16 7:19 am

It’s been 100 years since Gallipoli
Where our young folk sacrificed their lives fighting Tyranny over the sea
For our right to live Sovereign and Free…
And yet children diagnosed with cancer have no rights
And parents watch in helpless horror or be criminalised
As our youngsters lives are sacrificed to barbaric WW2 chemical Tyranny, here on our shores.
State Approved False Laws, and “Trade A-Greed,”
AMA Approved Death by Oncology Gestapo Creed.
Threatened Parents Silently Plead!  God Help Me!

Think of the death of our soldiers and our children too,
We tell their stories so the future knows better what to do.
Remember the Anzac lives lost and the Constitutional Freedom
They fought to uphold. And Why are parents of TODAY told?
They must adhere to a deadly toxic WWII medical protocol!?

Follow the money trail…
Under the guise of progress and
applying the Law of Graduation…
Four generations hence.
The Psychopathic Machine is in place.
Cigarette Science and sucrose coated lies with multi-national dollars invested;
Contaminated soil, food, water, medicine and marketing the choices you’re permitted…
A silent scourge, and toxic harvest.
The health of our soil, our water, our bodies now at the Limit.

So many Anzac lives lost indeed, but
Our inheritance appears to be a system of Economics of Greed
Where our constitutional rights, can be omitted.
Where no Sovereign right to choose HARM FREE MEDICINE can be allowed to succeed, not
Over Multi-National Codex and the Trade/A-Greed….
So much for Constitutional Creed!?

Whether it be in Trenches of Gallipoli or Hospital Corridors ,
too many lives are still lost in the quest for Sovereignty of Choice and
Truth in Medicine Right NOW.!
With Love to My lost boy Dylan,
who endured Cancer diagnosis twice, “go the Anzac Spirit!”
And Oshin, our hope,
that he and others may have the right to Live!!!
By Fiona, Upset Citizen, Mother of Dylan,
Deceased at 8 years old.
Children fight for their lives in the modern trenches with no defence and no rights.
Want to know Pressure! Try Saying No to Forced Medical Treatment…knowing Harm and Death is your alternative potential. Terriffic//http Vomit.
Bring in the Clown Doctors…

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Flanagan, Kelly and a bit of the Bard

Jason Steger, Literary Editor, The Age
25.04.16 1:13 pm

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The Boisbouvier Founding Chair in Australian Literature at the University of Melbourne – that’s Man Booker winner Richard Flanagan to you and me – is making his first public appearance in his new capacity as a professor on April 28 when he will be interviewing Paul Kelly about books, writing and the way writing influences his music.

Along the way, Kelly will talk about Seven Sonnets & A Song, his album that marks the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death (today, Saturday, April 23).

Kelly will also perform a track or two from the new album.

Flanagan says Kelly is one of the best readers he knows. “He thinks deeply about it,” he said, “and this is a different way of talking about Australian literature and the largeness of it.”

There’s no danger of Flanagan singing, though, but he might clap along (with one hand).

events.unimelb.edu.au

More HERE

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MAKE SOMEONE IDEAL

Dr Baljit Singh
24.04.16 6:11 pm

Make someone ideal
To guide you
Every single minute
Every second of your day
Do well
Think well
Get through your day

Your actions shall be consecutive
Success of the day
Years on
Life will be successful
It will happen during the day
What goes around, comes around
Comply with the day
The day is your ideal
A good attitude is required during the day

My Englishman is my imagination
He gets me, what I comply with during the day
This way, I get through
During nights, during the day
Have a good night
Have a good day

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Petrarchs Bookshop: Breaking the Boundaries launch

Anne
21.04.16 1:47 pm

The Launceston launch of the book - Breaking the Boundaries: activists stories (Wakefield Press) - will be at Petrarchs Bookshop, Brisbane Street, Launceston, on Friday 13th May at 6pm for 6.30pm.

Staunch mill opponent Peter Cundall will be launching the book in Launceston.

The main launch will be held in Adelaide on Sunday 1st May.

Attached therefore is your invitation, since while I might have written the chapter, it’s your story as much as it is mine so I hope those of you based in and around Launceston will consider coming to this event (and buying the book!)

For those of you closer to Hobart I understand there will be a launch event organised by fellow contributor Margaret Reynolds, but not until June as she’s out of the state during May.

Look forward to seeing lots of you on Friday 13th ...

Download Poster ...

Breaking_the_Boundaries_Petrarchs_e.pdf

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Picture Book Victoire

Paula Xiberras
21.04.16 6:20 am

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I phone Libby Hathorn just as she is returning home with the children from a trip of tree climbing. Libby hastens to add the children had been doing the climbing not her!

Libby has however, been climbing the ladder of a literary life triumphantly since she was a little girl of 5 years old. Libby has always written poetry and wrote her first book as a young teacher. There are now 53 books and counting under Libby’s authorship.

Talks and workshops at Salamanca’s Writers Centre mean Libby is a regular visitor to Tasmania.

To commemorate the centenary of the Battle of Somme Libby has written her latest book, ‘A Soldier, a Dog and a Boy’, which will resonate with its intended audience of children and also with adults, particularly as we prepare for ANZAC day.

The book was inspired by Libby’s family history and the discovery of a WWI photo at the State Library of NSW depicting a returning soldier with his backpack revealing a young French orphan boy smuggled to Australia.

The book focuses on the soldier, Alberts’ dialogue with the reader as he finds a dog, aptly named Victoire, which reminds him of his own dog back home. As Libby explains dogs were often used as mascots for the diggers and a symbol of luck. Albert then encounters a young French boy, Jacques, the owner of the dog who wants Victoire back. Mirroring the sacrifice of the soldiers Jacques gives Albert leave to take his dog. There is one final twist to the story by Albert.

Libby says she has deliberately omitted any vivid portrayal of war in the book because children know what war is and don’t need to be reminded. In fact, in the book there is a comment by Albert of ‘there is no war in Australia’. The only conflict that develops in the book is one demonstrating love, not war as the two principle characters both put their cases forward for ownership of Victoire.

Libby says her illustrator Phil Lesnie has managed a ‘masterstroke’ in putting an illustration without accompanying text for the end page(something not often employed), in which he manages to convey in his drawing a satisfying conclusion to the story, where, as Libby says, the fireworks of celebration replace those of war.

A Soldier, a Dog and a Boy is out now published by Hachette Australia

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Tasmanian Writers’ Centre: We’re at 78 per cent of our target ...

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
20.04.16 8:13 am

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Tasmanian Writers’ Centre HERE

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Hobart Bookshop, 5.30pm, Thurs May 5: The Moonlight Bird and the Grolken

Hobart Bookshop
14.04.16 7:08 am

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Join us as Christina Booth launches Anne Morgan’s new children’s book, illustrated by Lois Bury: The Moonlight Bird and the Grolken.

Anne Morgan is a well-published children’s author and a winner of the Environment Children’s Book of the Year Award for junior fiction. Lois Bury is an artist and illustrator in watercolours, oils and acrylics, and specialises in painting bird life on Bruny Island.

When: 5.30pm, Thursday May 5th
Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square

Free event, all welcome.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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Hobart Bookshop, 5.30pm, Wed, May 4: Ink in Her Veins

Hobart Bookshop
14.04.16 6:58 am

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Join us as Lucy Frost launches Sylvia Martin’s new book, Ink in Her Veins: The Troubled Life of Aileen Palmer.

Aileen Palmer - poet, translator, political activist, adventurer - was the daughter of two writers prominent in Australian literature in the first half of the twentieth century.

Vance and Nettie Palmer were well known as novelists, poets, critics and journalists, and Nettie suspected that their eldest would grow up with ‘ink in her veins’.

Aileen certainly inherited her parents’ talents, publishing poetry, translating the work of Ho Chi Minh, and recording what she referred to as ‘semi-fictional bits of egocentric writing’.

She also absorbed their interest in leftist politics, joining the Communist Party at university. This, combined with her bravery, led to participation in the Spanish Civil War and the ambulance service in London during World War II.

The return to Australia was not easy, and Aileen never successfully reintegrated into civilian life. In Ink in Her Veins Sylvia Martin paints an honest and moving portrait in which we see a talented woman slowly brought down by war, family expectations, and psychiatric illness and the sometimes cruel ‘treatments’ common in the 20th century.

When: 5.30pm, Wednesday May 4th
Where: The Hobart Bookshop, 22 Salamanca Square


Free event, all welcome.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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Fullers Bookshop: The Media and the Massacre book launch, 5:30pm Thursday April 21

Adam Ousten, Fullers Bookshop
12.04.16 2:16 pm

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In the lead-up to the twentieth anniversary of the Port Arthur massacre, Australian author and journalist Sonya Voumard will launch her new book, The Media and the Massacre, at Fullers Bookshop, 5:30pm Thursday April 21.

Chilling in her portrayal of journalism, betrayal, and the storytelling surrounding the 1996 Port Arthur massacre, Voumard brings to bear her own journalistic experiences, ideas and practices in a riveting inquiry into her profession that is part-memoir and part ethical investigation.

The Media and the Massacre explores the nature of journalistic intent and many of the wider moral and social issues of the storytelling surrounding the events, the people – in particular Martin Bryant and his mother Carleen – and their place in our cultural memory. She takes aim at the intent of the authors behind the controversial Born or Bred? Martin Bryant: The Making of a Mass Murderer and calls into question the actions of numerous journalists and social commentators.

Sonya will be in conversation with eminent journalist and former Mercury editor Garry Bailey.

‘Powerful [and] important’ The Saturday Paper
‘A fascinating case study’ Australian Book Review

Sonya Voumard is a journalist and author who grew up in Melbourne during the 1970s, the daughter of an Australian journalist father and a mother who was a refugee from wartime Europe. Her formative years were shaped by her mother’s wartime experiences, the protests over the Vietnam war, the death of her father in 1975, the sacking of Gough Whitlam and the deaths of the Australian newsmen in East Timor.

Having begun her career as a cadet journalist on the Melbourne Herald in 1980, Sonya worked as a political reporter on the Age in the late eighties and early nineties. These experiences inspired her 2008 novel Political Animals, which an Age literary critic described as ‘a sharp, dark and credibly drawn descent into the benthic relationship between Australian politicians and the media.’ Her memoir pieces have been published in Griffith Review and Meanjin. Sonya now teaches non-fiction writing at UTS while working on a Doctorate of Creative Arts on ‘The Power Dynamics Between Journalists and their Human Subjects’.

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Black Inc and Nero July Releases ...

Black Inc. and Nero
12.04.16 12:51 pm

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Black Inc. and Nero: Happy Mother’s Day

Black Inc. and Nero
11.04.16 12:50 pm

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Happy Mother’s Day from Black Inc. and Nero! Click on each cover to download ...

Click on the covers HERE

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The Madi Project is over 35% of its Pozible Campaign Target ...

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
07.04.16 11:52 am

We’re almost there - Pledge your Support

Get these books to South Sudan, and buy one for yourself too!
 
In 2014, after more than four years of collaborative effort with the Madi community in Tasmania, the Tasmanian Writers’ Centre published two books - When I Was a Boy in Sudan and When I Was a Girl in Sudan.

Now we’re selling as many books we can to raise enough money to send two thousand copies to children in South Sudan - concentrating on the Madi-speaking area of Loa. This cultural exchange will build a line of communication between Hobart, and the Madi people in South Sudan, helping to disseminate and strengthen their culture, language, and history.

Even though many Madi people live as asylum seekers in foreign countries, displaced from their homeland, we can still work to maintain their cultural dignity for generations to come.

You can help us reach this goal by visiting our Pozible Campaign Site, purchasing a book, and spreading the word to your friends, family and community!

Tasmanian Writers’ Centre HERE

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Big Sky Publishing’s Military History Releases for April

Sharon Evans, Big Sky Publishing
05.04.16 7:04 pm

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Tasmanian author David Coombes new book A Greater Sum of Sorrows is the perfect tie into upcoming commemorative events for Anzac Day.  Coombes provides the first Australian account of the battle of Bullecourt and the AIF’s achievements.

For a female perspective honouring our grandmothers and mothers - You’ll be Sorry! by Ann Howard - is a superb account of women’s participation in the Services during World War II. With interviews and stories the first hand perspectives are intrinsic in understanding the impact of war on the women and their future expectations.

War Child by Annette Janic and Catherine McCullagh is a true story that spans 100 years, a tale of Nazi Germany, the lingering effects of war, the 1950s Australian migration experience and a modern-day search. 

Read more, Big Sky Publishing, HERE

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THE MAN

Baljit Singh
04.04.16 6:41 am

The man
Weak
Very weak
Beaten to death
By the odds
Poor or wealthy
Could not stand against
The work of odds

The man of any religion
Cannot withstand
War, riots and fights
The work of odds
Beaten to death
By the collective odds
I did not realise
I realised the harm later
The beaten, forgot going to work
Civilised, kept looking the harm

Wanted to do many things
Love too, his false charm
Smiles to his love
Beaten to death
A lot of harm

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Tasmanian Writers’ Centre: This Month Writing ...

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
01.04.16 2:39 pm

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Hobart Bookshop, 5.30pm April 14: If We Could Fly

Hobart Bookshop
01.04.16 2:00 pm

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We are pleased to invite you to the launch, by Andrew Wilkie, of Karen Armstrong’s poetry collection, If We Could Fly.

“This collection of poetry will move you and linger in you long after the vigil is over. It will bring you out from the little black box we keep ourselves tucked into. Armstrong presents the harrowing circumstances as they are with acute sensitivity. The poems are quietly terrifying as they draw us to the bright light of death. They are a potent mix of sorrow and need, an ongoing state of mourning for the poet’s friend. This is a book necessary for life. Enjoy this book. It insists.”
- Karen Knight

When: 5.30pm, Thursday April 14
Where: The Hobart Bookshop

Free event, all welcome.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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Aoife’s Analysis of Ambiguity

Paula Xiberras
27.03.16 6:09 am

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Aoife Clifford has had a couple of visits to Tasmania and found it lovely both times she says Hobart and Launceston are ‘two fantastic cities’ and she’s keen to get back to explore the natural wilderness and of course MONA.

I recently spoke to Aoife (pronounced Ee-Fa) about her new crime book ‘All These Perfect Strangers’. The ‘Perfect’ alluded to in the title may be an ironic nod to the imperfection of most of us and our wrestling with varying degrees of responsibilities met or not met and guilty feelings for crimes real or imagined.

In law school Aoife became interested in how we decide who is responsible for a crime when so many relating factors may be blurred. In the novel Aoife explores how past crimes might impact on present and future ones.

Aoife likens the factors of crime as not being intact but in threads that need to be brought together and as Aoife says speaking from the viewpoint of her protagonist, Piper, all stories ‘could be told a hundred different ways’.

When Piper goes off to university to start afresh after an incident in her small town she finds ambiguity among her new friends and becomes part of events just as twisted and blurred as those she left behind in her home town. To say anymore would spoil the negotiation of twists and turns this book presents as Aoife forces us to think about the very nature of crime and its effects.

Another issue Aoife wanted to address in this book was the usually ‘easy disposal’ of female characters in crime novels without acknowledging their humanness and the pain at their loss.

This book is unique in among books of its genre in illustrating how we grapple with guilt and responsibility and how these like the threads of crime are never clear cut but blurred and muddied.

‘All these Perfect Strangers’ is out now published by Simon and Schuster.

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GLITTER, BLOOD & TEARS STOCKED INTERNATIONALLY

Ryan Schulz, Author
25.03.16 6:45 am

After the official launch of Glitter, Blood & Tears Wednesday 24 February, the weeks that followed saw the book shelved nation-wide. A month later it has been picked up by ‘The Box of Delights Bookshop’ Canada, who have also taken on the tender for Acadia University’s LGBTI Association, as part of the new construction for a library in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. ‘The Box of Delights Bookshop’ has included Glitter, Blood & Tears as part of its tender.

“I honestly thought the book would sit on Amazon for a few years and maybe one day be picked up by a reader who might have spread word of mouth.. I didn’t expect it to become stocked and raved about so quickly. The feedback I’ve received has been awesome!”

Glitter, Blood and Tears was first picked up by Collins Booksellers in Merimbula NSW, shortly followed by Dymocks Syndey NSW and Jullian Wood Booksellers VIC, then Readings St Kilda, Carlton & Hawthorn VIC, Torquay Books VIC, The Book House QLD, The Book Warehouse QLD, Boffins Books WA, Better Read Than Dead NSW, Cowlick Bookshop VIC, Dymocks Garden City WA, Megalong Books NSW, Maclean’s Booksellers NSW, State Cinema Bookstore TAS, and finally Crow Books, New Edition Fremantle and Planet Books WA. Booksellers have been placing second and third orders to restock multiple copies, and various book suppliers have also placed orders for distribution to an array of libraries.

The title is also available for purchase in ebook form, and also for direct delivery to readers door from online retailers such as Amazon, Booktopia, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, the Book Depository, iBooks, Kindle, Chapters, QBD and Boomerang Books.

For information on Glitter, Blood & Tears itself, visit: http://www.dennisjones.com.au/TitleDetail.php?recordID=9781522724704

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https://www.facebook.com/Glitter https://www.facebook.com/Glitter

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Black Inc. and Nero: New books ...

Black Inc. and Nero
21.03.16 10:36 am

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Fullers, Tuesday, March 22. 5.30pm: Tasmanian launch of The Third Script

Rachel Edwards, Editor in Chief, Transportation Press
21.03.16 10:05 am

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We would like to extend an invitation to you to celebrate the Tasmanian launch of The Third Script, stories from Iran, Tasmania and the UK, at Tasmania’s leading independent bookshop, Fullers on Tuesday, March 22 at 5.30pm.

In her introduction to the book, award winning novelist and essayist, Amanda Lohrey writes

“The Third Script is a remarkable collection, an unprecedented collaboration between Iranian, English and Tasmanian writers.”

And the stories? What can I say? They are exceptional, delightful and devastating and I look forward to you reading them.

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Vivaldi’s Venitian Violins

Paula Xiberras
11.03.16 5:53 am

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I recently chatted to author Alyssa Palombo from her home in the Great Lakes region of Buffalo, New York. It’s a beautiful place that Alyssa lives in but she is very keen to see another beautiful place, that being Australia, which she tells me she would ‘love to go’.

Alyssa has a twin love of history and music and combines them both to crescendo point in her book ‘The Violinist of Venice’.

In the book Alyssa creates a portrait of Vivaldi, the red haired musician priest, whose hair perhaps symbolises the red blooded passion for music that runs through his veins.

The novel explores the question of what if Vivaldi met a woman in the form of Adriana D’Amato, as passionate about music as himself, with the difference being that while for him it is possible to be dedicated to both his vocation as a priest and musician she is prevented by her gender from a musical vocation. The only music she is allowed to play is that for her husband’s pleasure.

In this novel, music, through Vivaldi, the priest reaches the heavens and it is the heavens that seemingly inspired Alyssa’s writing. In a very supernatural sense she tells me that the first chapter of the book came to her in a dream!

As a qualified musician, Alyssa still performs although she does say the opera/classical world is a small field and to be a success demands total dedication which with her dual career as an author Alyssa cannot do at this time.

Alyssa will continue her celebration of the historical background of the artist in her next novel which will focus on the visual arts.

‘The Violinist of Venice’ is out now, published by Pan McMillan Australia.

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New novel from award-winning author Patrick Holland explores Australia’s last bushrangers

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media
11.03.16 5:18 am

From the award-winning author of The Mary Smokes Boys, Patrick Holland’s One (Transit Lounge $29.95), is a novel of minimalist lyrical beauty that traverses the intersections between violence and love. It asks what right one man has to impose his will on another, and whether the written law can ever answer the law of the heart?

The last bushrangers in Australian history, James and Patrick Kenniff, were at the height at their horse thieving operation at turn of the 20th century. In One troops cannot pull the Kenniff Gang out of the ranges and plains of Western Queensland – the brothers know the terrain too well, and the locals are sympathetic to their escapades. When a policeman and a station manager go out on patrol from tiny Upper Warrego Station and disappear, Sergeant Nixon makes it his mission to pursue the gang, especially, Jim Kenniff, who becomes for him an emblem of the violence that resides in the heart of the country.

Brisbane-based Patrick Holland is the award-winning author of The Source of the Sound, The Mary Smokes Boys, Riding the Trains in Japan and The Darkest Little Room.

 

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