Books

Hobart Bookshop: Robbed. Paul Keating

Hobart Bookshop
31.03.15 11:11 am

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• The Hobart Bookshop is pleased to invite you to the launch of John Tully’s new novel, Robbed of Every Blessing.

Join us as Tim Thorne launches the book, which will be available for sale and signing.

Ireland, early 1800s. The Napoleonic Wars have ended, leaving an already disjointed country in peril. Maurice O’Dwyer, a young Irishman, considers the lifeless body of an English tithe-collector slain under a rain-filled sky. From that moment it seems his fate is sealed: he and his young simpleton brother, Padraig, are exiled to Australia, An Astrail, to the convict-filled island of Van Diemen’s Land - leaving behind his love, his land, and his liberty. However, in the bush Maurice discovers that there are allies in the most unlikely of places.

When: Wednesday April 15th, 5.30pm
Where: The Hobart Bookshop

• The Hobart Bookshop is pleased to invite you to help us celebrate the release of David Day’s new book, Paul Keating: The Biography.

Join us in the shop for the event and to meet David Day; books available for sale and signing.

In the tradition of his bestselling Curtin and Chifley comes David Day’s exhaustive biography of one of our most fascinating prime ministers. Paul Keating was one of the most significant political figures of the late twentieth century, firstly as treasurer for eight years and then Prime Minister for five years. Although he has spent all of his adult life in the public eye, Keating has eschewed the idea of publishing his memoirs and has discouraged biographers from writing about his life. Undaunted, best-selling biographer David Day has taken on the task of giving Keating the biography that he deserves. Based on extensive research in libraries and archives, interviews with Keating’s former colleagues and associates, and walking the tracks of Keating’s life, Day has painted the first complete portrait of Paul Keating, covering both the public and private man.

When: Thursday April 16th, 5.30pm  
Where: The Hobart Bookshop

Free event, all welcome.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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FIRST DAVID IRELAND NOVEL IN 18 YEARS TO BE SERIALISED BY ISLAND MAGAZINE

Kate Harrison, Island Marketing
28.03.15 6:08 am

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The first David Ireland novel in 18 years will be serialised by Island magazine, it was announced today.

The novel, titled The World Repair Video Game, will be published in five instalments, beginning with the next issue of Island magazine (#140), available from March 30.
 
Bemused by the renewed interest in his work, following the reissuing of some of his previous novels in the Text Classics series, David Ireland said: ‘This is the first time any of my novels has been serialised. I’m greatly looking forward to having a copy in my hands and seeing how it looks. Serialising is such a great tradition. I’m in good company, thanks to Island magazine.’
 
‘Fortunately, it is a novel that benefits from reading slowly,’ said Island editor, Matthew Lamb, ‘with time to recover and ponder between each instalment, and with the opportunity to re-read before moving on to the next. It helps that Ireland’s novel is not plot-driven, but is animated rather by the interplay of ideas and character.’

The World Repair Video Game
 
Geordie Williamson, Island’s fiction editor, introducing the novel in an article in Saturday’s Weekend Australian, states: ‘Like The Chantic Bird, his 1968 debut, [The World Repair Video Game] tells the story of an outsider who constructs a personal philosophy that runs at widdershins to ‘ordinary’ society and then lives by it, making him either a madman or the clear-eyed ruler of a sovereign state. But where that first novel was charged with a young man’s energy, a punkish joie de vivre, this new work is characterised by the calm and quiet maturity of its narrator.’
 
In his column in the Weekend Australian, Stephen Romei, writes: ‘As someone who has read a bit of the author’s unpublished work, I’d classify The World Repair Video Game as classic late-Ireland: obsessive, creepy, philosophical, funny. It’s important to remember, reading any of Ireland’s novels, that he is a great satirist. The story is told in diary form by middle-aged Kennard Stirling, a family black sheep, an outsider, who lives on a bush block with his dog and who, you sense from the outset, is up to something awful, and not for the first time.’
 
Williamson adds: ‘Once again, Ireland has imagined an anti-hero appropriate to our times. Kennard is a deep ecologist in the sense that he does not place humans (or, at least, all humans) at the heart of calculations about the proper use and value of nature. Indeed, those who have previously criticised the author for the determined coarseness of his language will be stilled by the exquisite prose Kennard is granted to describe his private Eden. He relays an unfeigned love of animals and trees that stands quite apart from his pessimistic beliefs regarding the probable future of our race.’
 
This announcement comes on the back of several other announcements at Island magazine over the past month, and it is very much the culmination of these changes at the magazine that the David Ireland project is being introduced.

PRINT-ONLY
 
Earlier this year, it was announced that Island would be going print-only, with no online content or digital edition, but with a website and social media focused on providing subscriptions to the print issues. This was accompanied by a 200% increase in the print-run, and a more widely established national distribution. 

MONA PARTNERSHIP
 
This idea of establishing Island as a print artefact coincides with the announcement that Island had forged a literary partnership with David Walsh and the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA).
 
In an introductory note to the next issue of Island - due out next week - Walsh writes: ‘my lust for literature, and my lust for collecting, has led me to seek a trophy journal.’ Lamb and Walsh see the partnership as essentially using MONA as a framing device to help put Island magazine – as a print artefact – on show, to help amplify its explorations of all aspects of literary culture.

MARSHALL MCLUHAN
 
This forthcoming issue of Island will also publish an edited excerpt from a recently uncovered book-length manuscript by renowned media theorist, Marshall McLuhan.
 
Completed in 1976, but unpublished due to illness and death, “The Future of the Library” successfully predicts the impact of information technology on libraries, but – perhaps more interestingly – it also shows the impact of libraries on information technology and publishing, in ways that are still relevant to us today.
 
In this essay, McLuhan states: ‘In industry there is an old saying: “If it works, it is obsolete.” We have been saying for some years that the book and printing are obsolete. Many people interpret this to mean that printing and the book are about to disappear. Obsolescence, in fact, means the opposite. It means that a service has become so pervasive that it permeates every area of a culture like the vernacular itself. Obsolescence, in short, ensures total acceptance and ever wider use.’

ISLAND 140
 
It is this logic that is behind Island’s move to go print-only. Moreover, it is McLuhan’s idea that media forms that have been previously rendered obsolete may very well be retrieved by the establishment of new media forms, that is behind Island’s attempt to retrieve the form of the serial novel, by publishing David Ireland’s The World Repair Video Game. 

Island 140 will be published on Monday 30 March 2015.

Island Magazine Social Media
TWITTER: @IslandMagTas
FACEBOOK: /islandmag
INSTAGRAM: @IslandMagTas
HASHTAG: #islandmagtas

Our mailing address is:

Island

PO Box 4703

Bathurst Street PO
Hobart, TAS 7000
Australia

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Hobart Bookshop: Off The Cliff

Hobart Bookshop
25.03.15 2:30 pm

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Please join us at the launch of Jasmine Lawrence’s new collection of poetry, Off The Cuff.

When: Friday April 10th, 5.30pm
Where: The Hobart Bookshop

Free event, all welcome.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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Watch Clive James read his poem ... Early to Bed

The Observer
18.03.15 9:00 am

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Watch Clive read here

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Terry Pratchett in quotes: 15 of the best

Guardian. Image: Wikipedia here
13.03.15 8:40 am

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Read those quotes, The Guardian, here

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Marshall McLuhan manuscript from 1976 uncovered, Island magazine to publish excerpt

Kate Harrison, Island Marketing
12.03.15 10:00 am

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A previously unpublished manuscript by Marshall McLuhan – the founding father of modern media communications theory – has been uncovered.  

Written in 1976, with Robert K. Logan, the manuscript titled “The Future of the Library: An old figure in a new ground”, was to be the culmination of McLuhan’s work on media ecology.

A 6000 word edited excerpt, abstracted from the 60,000 word manuscript, will be published in Australian literary quarterly, Island magazine (issue 140, due out on March 30), with kind permission from the Marshall McLuhan Estate.

McLuhan’s work on media ecology began in the 1950s, with the publication of The Mechanical Bride: Folklore of Industrial Man. Although it was not until the publications of the early 1960s – with The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man and Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, which launched such ideas as ‘the medium is the message’ and ‘global village’ – that McLuhan became internationally famous.

McLuhan, who predicted the internet 30 years before it came into existence, wrote “The Future of the Library” with Robert Logan during the mid-1970s, before the onset of home computers, and yet he was able to accurately foresee the changes rapid that libraries would undertake over the next 35 years, in light of the development of information technology.

Significantly, McLuhan offers a suggestion for what a library of the future could still look like.

‘What is most interesting about this manuscript,’ said Island editor, Matthew Lamb, ‘is not just that McLuhan had the foresight to see what has happened over the past 35 years, but that his suggestions for how we should address these changes is still relevant. In fact, what McLuhan had to say about our present moment from his vantage point of the past is far more interesting, prescient, and useful, than what most of our contemporary media commentators have to say today.’

This announcement comes on the back of recent announcements that Island is forming a literary partnership with David Walsh and the Museum of Old and New Arts (MONA), and with this coming issue, Island will be available only in a print edition, with no digital edition or online content.

‘The decision to go print-only is very much a result of a close reading of the work of Marshall McLuhan,’ said Lamb. ‘So it seemed appropriate to launch the first print-only, MONA-edition with a feature essay by McLuhan himself.’

As McLuhan writes, in this essay: ‘In industry there is an old saying: “If it works, it is obsolete.” We have been saying for some years that the book and printing are obsolete. Many people interpret this to mean that printing and the book are about to disappear. Obsolescence, in fact, means the opposite. It means that a service has become so pervasive that it permeates every area of a culture like the vernacular itself. Obsolescence, in short, ensures total acceptance and ever wider use.’

Island 140 will be published on 30 March 2015.

Island Magazine Social Media
TWITTER: @IslandMagTas
FACEBOOK: /islandmag
INSTAGRAM: @IslandMagTas
HASHTAG: #islandmagtas

Our mailing address is:
Island
PO Box 4703
Bathurst Street PO
Hobart, TAS 7000
Australia

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Fullers Bookshop, 5.30pm Thursday: Henry Reynolds in conversation with Ian McFarlane

Peter Ingram-Jones
10.03.15 9:48 am

Author Ian McFarlane will be in conversation with Professor Henry Reynolds about his new book

Van Diemen’s Land
An Aboriginal History
Fullers Bookshop Thursday 12 March at 5.30 pm

Dr McFarlane’s controversial new history of Aborigines in Tasmania is a seminal work that corrects crucial assumptions in previous works. Arguably the most significant book to appear in Tasmanian publishing this year, it represents his strong desire to ensure that a proper history of the Tasmanian Aborigines be recorded.

Dr McFarlane lectures in history at UTAS at the North West Coast campus and has published widely in journals and has one previous book called Beyond Awakening. He fought in the Vietnam War and was a member of the Waterside Workers Union before becoming an academic.

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Simon’s Spellbinding Book

Paula Xiberras
09.03.15 5:46 am

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Simon Barnard, the author of ’The A-Z of Convicts’ is a former Tasmanian. The book is a mammoth project of over 20 years of research including, many camping trips in Tassie.  The volume captures in intricately-detailed illustrations by Simon himself, convicts and other characters in realistic poses.

Simon is a former art student who didn’t pursue his artistic studies finding that ‘the artist poses questions, while the illustrator answers them’.

The book aims and succeeds to be accessible to both adults and even reluctant younger readers, who might be challenged by a more textually and academically-dense volume. Such has the appeal been to younger readers and the encouragement for them to attempt illustration, that a young reader sent Simon a letter with his own illustrations.

One particularly fascinating area Simon explores is the rich history of The Ross Bridge in Tasmania, literally walking history as you encounter its carvings of people associated or related to the building of the bridge. There is also the symbolism inherent in the carving of a lion with a lamb underfoot thought to symbolise England (The Lion) and its dominance over the exiled convict (The Lamb).

Barnard also showcases a literary connection, the story of the convict Issac Solomon who was sent to Tasmania and is thought to be the inspiration for the character Fagin in Dickens’ ‘Oliver Twist’.

The book also contains lots of amazing trivia, perhaps overlooked by some texts; especially fascinating is Simon’s account of the Female Factory convicts and a particular group known as ‘The Flash Mob’, rebellious women who would dress up in forbidden jewellery and scarfs ...  and once completing their chores would ‘do their own thing’.

Such has been the success of this book that Simon is working on another book more specifically on convict tattoos, which is pardon the pun ‘lightly illustrated’ in this book.

In a time when we, as descendants no longer wish to wash away the ‘convict stain’, this book is a wonderful history for as wide as possible an audience. A nice touch is the alphabetical categorising of the topics included in the book.

The A-Z of Convicts Is out now published by Text Publishing.

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Chewing Gum Can Perform Miracles, Unless You’re Facing Dennis Lillee!

Paula Xiberras
07.03.15 3:41 am

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Ian Brayshaw enjoys Tasmania and has been here 3 times, twice with his wife and once with his son.  Ian recalls the best meal he ever had was in Tassie when he feasted on a fresh flathead at a resort at Coles Bay …

A journalist and former cricketer, Ian’s most recent book is ‘The Miracle Match’,  which tells the story of a domestic Gillette Cup cricket match played between Queensland and Western Australia in 1976 at the WACA on a seam-ingly (pardon the pun) bowler-friendly wicket

Western Australia and Queensland boasted the five big players at the time and some would say of any time: Greg Chappell, Dennis Lillee, Jeff Thompson, Rodney Marsh and Viv Richards.

The WA team was bowled out for a meagre 77 runs.

It seemed the game was all over … but you could never discount Dennis Lillee …

Lillee bowled the great Viv Richards for a duck; then Greg Chappell for single figures … and incredibly WA stole the victory. 

It was a time when cricket wasn’t as ‘sanitised’ as it is today and it was populated by some memorable characters.

It was a match to remember. Ian phoned Viv Richards to ask if he remembered ‘that’ match. Viv’s reply: ‘It was never far from his mind’.

It was also a time when cricketers were not professionals and had other careers;  they played. Ian says, for ’ the unbridled sheer joy of the game’. 

It was also a time that showcased the ferocious never-give-up spirit of Dennis Lillee; his skill in bowling, his will to win. Ian says it made him ‘the full package … stamina, fitness with hard work and talent’ that had the other ‘Ian’, in Ian Chappell, ‘doing handstands’ over his luck in having such players in his Test team.


Another great of the game beautifully drawn by Ian is Viv Richards, who Ian relates would come out to the wicket without a helmet bravely announcing it was ‘just him and his chewing gum’.

Then there was Rick Charlesworth who would later come to prominence as a hockey player and coach …  but as a Renaissance Man also boasted a medical degree and a political career.  Ian says he was a great competitor and feels privileged to have played with him.

Other greats featured in the match include Kim Hughes and Bruce Yardley; the latter admired by Ian admired for changing from fast bowling to spin.

Ian believes his career as a player has helped him as a journalist, giving him a certain authority and enabling him to establish connections in the sports world and opening doors to sports stars.

It is interesting to note that the ‘Brayshaw’ name comes from the old English via Lancashire and means ‘broad’ and ‘wide’ and ‘small wood’ … on the day of ‘The Miracle Match’ the bats were ‘small wood’ to the mighty eyes of Dennis Lillee.

‘The Miracle Match’ is out now published by Hardie Grant.

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Don’t miss this chance! Omar Musa to inspire audiences in Hobart

Amber Wilson, Tasmanian Writers’ Centre Communications Officer, http://www.tasmanianwriters.org
03.03.15 6:09 pm

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In a rare event for Hobart, renowned spoken word and hip-hop poet Omar Musa will be delivering a skills-based workshop followed by a raw, edgy performance and open mic night on Saturday, March 28.

The workshop and performance is presented by the Tasmanian Writers’ Centre in partnership with the Tasmanian Poetry Festival, and will be held at the new arts space the ARTS Factory in South Hobart.

The Malaysian-Australian rapper and poet from Queanbeyan is the former winner of the Australian Poetry Slam and the Indian Ocean Poetry Slam ( see his winning piece on Youtube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3u8dz50GbVk ). He has released three hip hop albums, two poetry books (including Parang), appeared on ABC’s Q&A and received a standing ovation at TEDx Sydney at the Sydney Opera House. He is currently working on a play, Bonegatherer. His first novel, Here Come the Dogs, was published in August 2014.

Omar will appeal to a wide range of audiences and the events have been priced to be accessible to everyone – only $30 for the workshop and $10 for the performance. Anyone is welcome to join in the open mic section of the night and deliver their own brand of street poetry.

“Omar is so inspiring and has a well-deserved and commanding following throughout the contemporary Australian poetry and writing scene. I encourage you all to mark the date in your diary,” Tasmanian Writers’ Centre director Chris Gallagher said.

Tasmanian Poetry Festival director Cameron Hindrum said Tasmania was a rich landscape for urban poetry to spring from.

“Tasmania has a great energy for edgy arts – it won’t be long before street poetry catches on here as a way that young people express themselves,” he said.

Tickets are selling fast through Eventbrite ...

for the workshop: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/spoken-word-with-omar-musa-workshop-tickets-15970028786

and performance: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/spoken-word-with-omar-musa-performance-and-open-mic-tickets-15970073921

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Hobart Bookshop: Never to Return

Hobart Bookshop. Pub: Feb 19
03.03.15 6:00 pm

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The Hobart Bookshop is pleased to invite you to the launch, by Gordon Brown, of Marjorie McArdell Davey’s new book, Never To Return.

This is a fascinating story of seven thousand boys - mostly teenagers - who passed through the children’s prison Point Puer, across the bay from Port Arthur. Only three ever escaped. This story is an account of what might have happened to them.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop
When: 6pm Thursday 19th March

Free event, all welcome.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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David Darcy’s Devoted Dogs

Paula Xiberras
03.03.15 6:32 am

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David Darcy first started visiting Tasmania a couple of years ago and now it’s become an annual event. David loves all parts of Tasmania especially Launceston and says given the opportunity he is happy ‘to rave about Tassie’ to everyone he can and he hopes to get back soon and this time stay for about two weeks.

David’s latest book is a companion book to his ‘Every Man and His Dog’, a book about men and their relationships with their dogs. This time David explores the relationship between women and their dogs called ‘A Girls Best Friend’.

The name David means ‘beloved’ and these companion volumes demonstrate to us that when it comes to people and their dogs it really is a case of the dogs being ‘beloved’ to and by their owners.

David says that the women’s story of their relationship with their dogs is a little different than that of the male as women don’t necessarily do what men do and ‘parade their dogs on the back of the ute’ because David jokes women treat their dogs like their children and they wouldn’t put their children on the back of their utes!

David says some women with dogs might be experiencing ‘empty nest syndrome’ and their dogs fill this gap. Giving further support to this idea is one owner documented in the book, called Veronica that said of her dog ‘his name was Dan, and he was human’.

Another factor that David found surprising was that about 90 percent of the dogs women own are rescue dogs. There are stories of some women paying great sums to bring dogs from overseas, enduring the dog’s extended period in isolation when the outcome was not known. Some even forgo their mortgage to pay for their dog and would gladly let their dog potentially tamper with even their most treasured objects around their house. Older owners remarked that now when so many medical advances were available people were able to provide the best for their dogs.

With a sprinkling of celebrities stories included in the book, it’s clear that famous or not, the relationship and devotion to their dogs is the same with the only difference being that the celebrities have the means to give their dog a little more of a comfy lifestyle!

While writing this book David introduced a little cat he rescued in the desert to his family and says the cat has changed his life for the better.

One can only wonder what this new acquisition might mean for David’s next book!

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The first full-length novel from A.S. Patrić, ‘Black Rock White City’

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media
02.03.15 2:11 pm

‘I couldn’t put it down’ -Christos Tsiolkas, ‘‘Eminently readable’ -Books + Publishing

Black Rock White City (Transit Lounge, April 2015, $29.95) is a novel about the damages of war, the limits of choice, and the hope of love. During a hot Melbourne summer Jovan’s cleaning work at a bayside hospital is disrupted by acts of graffiti and violence becoming increasingly malevolent. For Jovan the mysterious words that must be cleaned away dislodge the poetry of the past. He and his wife Suzana were forced to flee Sarajevo and the death of their children. 

Intensely human, yet majestic in its moral vision, Black Rock White City is an essential story of Australia’s suburbs now, of displacement and immediate threat, and the unexpected responses of two refugees as they try to reclaim their dreams. It is a breathtaking roar of energy that explores the immigrant experience with ferocity, beauty and humour.

A. S. Patrić is the award winning author of Las Vegas for Vegans, published in 2012 by Transit Lounge & shortlisted for the 2013 Queensland Literary Awards. Alec lives in bayside Melbourne and is a St Kilda bookseller.

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MUSEUM OF OLD AND NEW ART (MONA) AND ISLAND MAGAZINE ...

Kate Harrison, Island Marketing
02.03.15 8:01 am

... PROPOSE A LITERARY PARTNERSHIP

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MONA founder David Walsh and Island magazine editor Matthew Lamb announced today that they are to form a literary partnership. 

In an introductory note to the next issue of Island - due out in late March - Walsh writes: ‘my lust for literature, and my lust for collecting, has led me to seek a trophy journal.’

Lamb and Walsh see the partnership as essentially using MONA as a framing device to help put Island magazine on show, to help amplify its explorations of all aspects of literary culture. So if Island is seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of MONA.

Each issue will be like a miniature fringe exhibition of ideas, words and images. Island will retain its creative autonomy and intellectual independence. MONA will be invited to submit bespoke content and ideas for Island to consider. Together the partners are taking their first big risk: starting with the next issue Island will become a print-only magazine, with no digital edition, and no online content from the magazine. 

There will still be a website through which to subscribe to the magazine or to locate retailers, but essentially, like any museum exhibit, the audience is asked to engage with the physical experience of the magazine as a print-artefact.

Lamb said he first approached Walsh after seeing The Red Queen exhibition in 2013 that explored the reasons behind why homo sapiens make art, because ‘it became clear to me that MONA is built primarily on ideas. And those ideas derive, in no small part, from David’s love of reading, of writing, of books, and of libraries.’

‘Whether this will be a long relationship is difficult to predict,’ Walsh writes, in his introductory note. ‘Of more significance is whether it is consensual: am I raping Island? Was Island in such a parlous predicament that it had to bend over and take one from me, all the time thinking of Tasmania?’ 

Lamb replies: ‘Did we bend over and take one from Walsh? That’s not entirely true. We were standing up against a wall at the time. I like to think, in that way, we have retained our dignity.’

Island is one of Australia’s leading literary magazines, a print-only quarterly of ideas, writing and culture. Based in Hobart, Tasmania, Island has been evolving within Australia’s media ecology for the past 35 years.

Island 140 will be published on 30 March 2015.

Island Magazine Social Media
TWITTER: @IslandMagTas
FACEBOOK: /islandmag
INSTAGRAM: @IslandMagTas
HASHTAG: #islandmagtas

Our mailing address is:
Island
PO Box 4703
Bathurst Street PO
Hobart, TAS 7000
Australia

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A Short History of Richard Kline

Jessica Pearce, Black Inc. Books
02.03.15 3:23 am

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Black Inc. Media Release
Black Inc.
37–39 Langridge Street, Collingwood VIC 3066 Australia
tel: 03 9486 0288 / fax: 03 9486 0244
http://www.blackincbooks.com
facebook.com/blackincbooks @BlackIncBooks
Black Inc. is an imprint of Schwartz Media Pty Ltd ABN 75 748 797 539

A Short History of Richard Kline is the much-anticipated literary novel by
Amanda Lohrey. Her first in over a decade, this is about one man’s search for
meaning in the modern world.

“I felt like a machine in which the battery had gone flat. And it was true that
simple things could recharge it for a while: a book; a walk in the bush; a swim.

But there were whole weeks when I felt oppressed by the sheer ordinariness of life,
its mindless repetition. Birth, death, decay, birth, death ... ”

Richard Kline is average, cynical, depressed. All his life he has been haunted by
a sense that something is lacking. He envies the ease with which some people
slip – seemingly unquestioningly – into contented suburban life or the pursuit
of wealth. As he moves into middle age, Richard feels increasingly angry and
empty.

But then a strange event, a profound epiphany, awakens him to a different way
of living. He finds himself driven, almost against his own will, to resolve the
discontent he has suffered since childhood. From pharmaceuticals to New Age
therapies to an encounter with a spiritual teacher, Richard embarks on a journey
toward enlightenment.

This audacious novel is an exploration of masculinity, the mystical and our very
human yearning for something more. It is hypnotic, nuanced and Lohrey’s
finest offering yet.

Praise for Amanda Lohrey

“A master storyteller” – West Australian

“Cool, clear, accomplished” – Age

“Full of gorgeously framed images and language that begs the reader to wholly
enter the lives she renders” – Canberra Times

“Lohrey achieves a kind of perfection” – Sydney Morning Herald

ISBN: 978-1-86395-718-2 • RRP $29.99
March 2015 Release • 272 pages
Also available as an ebook

Amanda Lohrey is the
author of many acclaimed
novels, as well as the award-winning short story
collection Reading Madam
Bovary. She has also
written two Quarterly Essays:
Groundswell and Voting for
Jesus. In 2012 she was awarded
the Patrick White Literary
Award.

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New adventure fiction book follows daughters outback search for ...

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media
25.02.15 12:32 pm

New adventure fiction book follows daughters outback search for grandfather’s plane lost during WW2.

The adventure novel Fire Eye (Short Stop Press $29.99) follows the journey of a young woman as she seeks to find the wreckage of her grandfather’s plane that was lost during World War II. She engages a part-time adventurer to launch a search to find the aircraft that has a connection to the Torres Strait legend of the ruby, ‘Fire Eye’.

As they both journey deeper into the unforgiving Australian outback, they discover that they are not alone and it’s not just snakes that they should fear. Will she be able to honour her grandfather’s memory and solve her families secrets? An action-packed read with a hint of romance, Fire Eye is for adventure-seekers everywhere.

Tasmania-based author Peter d’Plesse is a private pilot who has explored the mountains, jungle and desert of the Australian landscape over many years.

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Transportation Press:  Transportation islands and cities launched. Welcome Iran!

Transportation Press
24.02.15 5:34 pm

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Transportation islands and cities is a collection of contemporary stories from Tasmania and London. Issue two will include writers from Tasmania, UK and Iran.

Issue one, Transportation Islands and Cities launched in Hobart, Nottingham and London to full houses, and has bumped Richard Flanagan off the number 1 best seller spot for the first time since his Booker Prize win.

As Peter Conrad, London based, Tasmanian born writer and Oxford don, said in his introduction to the collection “There are many kinds of transportation, not all of which involve prison ships. I first read a print-out of the work in this book last November on a flight from London to New York and, although I was aware of the plane battling through grim winter weather as we travelled ahead, they tugged me in a different direction – sometimes with a physical shock, as if I had plunged into the psychological equivalent of an air pocket. The stories, as my mother would have said, ‘took me back’.

Editor of Tasmanian Times, the inimitable Lindsay Tuffin launched the book in Hobart, you can watch his launch speech here:

http://walleahpress.com.au/garradunga/launch-transportation-islands-cities/

Read more here

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Writers | Lindsay Tuffin | Books | History | Society

Get that novel written in new year-long course

Amber Wilson, Tasmanian Writers’ Centre Communications Officer
23.02.15 2:14 pm

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The Tasmanian Writers’ Centre is delighted to announce A Novel Journey - nine sessions over the course of 2015 designed to guide both budding and experienced writers alike through the journey of penning their very own masterpieces.

A Novel Journey will be held concurrently in Launceston and Hobart, starting March 28 and 29 respectively. The sessions will be held on weekend dates, meaning that emerging authors won’t need to take time off their day jobs to hone their craft.

The Centre has recruited some heavyweight talent in delivering the course. All tutors are experienced and renowned published authors. Robyn Mundy, Tansy Rayner Roberts, Lian Tanner and Julie Hunt are some of the authors who will be delivering their wisdom in Hobart at the Salamanca Arts Centre Meeting Room. Cameron Hindrum, Robyn Friend and Dirk Flinthart are just a sprinkling of the experts to share their writerly nous at East Launceston’s High Street Adult Education Building.

Sessions include structure, narrative, character development, plot, settings and place, style, rhythm and pace, dialogue, polishing, reflection and review, and how to get published. Sessions run for three hours each, and the course will wrap up in both Hobart and Launceston in mid-November.

Cost for all nine sessions is $550 for TWC members and $700 for non-members. Casual spots are also available.

To book a place in A Novel Journey ...

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Launceston set to celebrate globetrotting literary project

Rachel Edwards, Amber Wilson
23.02.15 11:42 am

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A cutting-edge publication that links Tasmanian writers with Londoners is soon to hold its launch in Launceston.

Transportation is an ambitious literary project that links writers from seemingly disparate locations. Its premiere publication, Transportation, Islands and Cities, is a collection of contemporary short stories by a range of authors from both locations living at opposite sides of the globe.

Transportation Islands and Cities will be officially launched in Launceston at Volume 2 Bookshop by Cameron Hindrum, Tasmanian Poetry Festival artistic director. The event will also feature readings from local writers Lucinda Shannon, Luke Wren Reid and Poet Musing.

The almanac was launched in Hobart in January at Fullers Bookshop with several hundred attendees. The celebrations were closely followed by launches in London and Nottingham.

The Transportation project is already working on future publications and strengthening literary connections between Tasmania, the UK and now with Iran.

The Transportation Press project has brought together two editors from opposite sides of the world. Sean Preston is founder and editor of Open Pen literary magazine and the London-based editor.

Rachel Edwards, former editor of Island magazine, was this project’s Tasmanian-based editor. Shirindokht Nourmanesh will be editing the Iranian content in issue two.

WHEN: Friday February 27, 2015
WHERE: Volume 2 Bookshop,
TIME: 5:30-6:30pm
RSVP: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)


E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
F:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/383049441832156/?fref=ts
T: @transportlontas
W: http://transportationbook.com/

Transportation: islands and cities is a collection of short stories from Tasmanians and Londoners to be published in book form in late 2014.

Subscribe to our newsletter here:

- http://transportationbook.com/subscribe/
W: http://transportationbook.com/
F: https://www.facebook.com/transportationbook
T: @transportlontas

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Don Knowler’s new book, Riding the Devil’s Highway: a field guide to the flattened fauna of Tasma

Hobart Bookshop
23.02.15 11:08 am

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The Hobart Bookshop is pleased to invite you to the launch, by Nick Mooney, of Don Knowler’s new book, Riding the Devil’s Highway—a field guide to the flattened fauna of Tasmania, the roadkill capital of the world.

When: 5.30pm, Thursday 26th February
Where: The Hobart Bookshop

Free event, all welcome.

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Help promote ... Turning Points to Compassion

Christine Materia
23.02.15 1:15 am

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Turning Points in Compassion by Gypsy Wulff and Fran Chambers

I am assisting Gypsy and Fran the editors of the beautiful new book Turning Points in Compassion with their goal of selling 1 million copies of their book.

All profits from the sale of the book are donated to animal sanctuaries and rescue groups.

“Covering a range of topics from politics and law, to spiritual and social change, Turning Points in Compassion makes a compelling case for the recognition of the beauty, sentience and intelligence of all things…This volume is essential reading for anyone interested in, or committed to, the ethics, politics and life of veganism.” Dr Shannon Brincat, Research Fellow at Griffith University, Queensland.

This inspirational collection of personal stories challenges our widespread perceptions about our relationship with animals. With a powerful blend of compassion and honesty, the writers in Turning Points in Compassion share pivotal moments that awakened them to a life-changing awareness. Each one’s life has been enriched beyond measure as a result of their journey.

With open eyes, hearts and minds, they describe their entry to a new world of compassionate living where they no longer see animals as their food or their property.

Their description of a life lived with awareness of animals as equally feeling beings who have conscious awareness and lives that matter to them will touch the hearts of people everywhere. No readers will be left unchallenged by this book. All profits from sales are donated to animal sanctuaries and rescue groups.

If you’re in Tassie and would like a copy, let Chrissie Rowland at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) know as she is distributing it on behalf of Gypsy and Fran in Southern Tasmania

As long as there are slaughterhouses
There will be battlefields
~ Leo Tolstoy

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Politics | International | Local | National | State | Economy | Health | Opinion | History | Personal | Society

Tasmanian Writers’ Centre and the NBN ...

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
12.02.15 12:43 pm

Dear Members and Friends,

Many apologies to those of you who have been trying to phone over the last couple of days. We’re experiencing issues switching over to the NBN and our phone number will be out of action until Monday 16th Feb. In the meantime please call us on our second line 03 6223 3354 - especially if you’d like to enrol in A Novel Journey or renew your membership!

Thanks for your patience. 

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Get cosy with a Tasmanian author this Valentine’s Day

Amber Wilson, Tasmanian Writers’ Centre Communications Officer
11.02.15 11:46 am

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It doesn’t matter whether you’re loved-up with your soulmate firmly in tow, or a lonely heart looking for “the one”, you’re sure to enjoy getting friendly with one of Tasmania’s premier romance authors come this February 14.

Tasmanian Writers’ Centre director Chris Gallagher said romance writing seemed to blossom naturally in Tasmania, with home-grown lovey-dovey writing selling big both in Australia and overseas.

“Tasmania is a heart-shaped island, so perhaps it should come as no surprise that our romance authors sell thousands, or even millions, of books,” she said.

“Or perhaps there is just something in the air.”

Kathryn Lomer is one of Tasmania’s favourite dyed-in-the-wool romantics. Her short story Crush, which appears in 2014’s Australian Love Stories, is one that’s sure to pull on the heartstrings. Crush is a sad tale about a woman so lonely that she sends herself a Valentine’s Day card. It’s also got more than its fair share of racy scenes too: I rush inside the house to touch and touch that one part, until it explodes into red, pales, explodes again, pales again, explodes red, and I am stranded on my bed glowing like an ember in shuttered half-dark. Kathryn grew up on a farm in North-West Tasmania. These days, she lives in Hobart and has won a swag of awards over the years including the Anne Elder Award, the Kenneth Slessor Poetry Prize, the Margaret Scott Prize and the Gwen Harwood Poetry Prize.

Need something more salacious than that? You’re in luck. Hobart author Ris Wilkinson has written 50 Harlequin Mills and Boon romance novels, written under the pseudonym Melanie Milburne. Mrs Wilkinson has an academic background is a former champion swimmer, but these days prefers to make readers swoon by the power of her lascivious imagination. Her novels have been sold in more than 100 overseas markets, translated into 25 languages, and have sold more than eight million copies. She also won the 2011 Australian Romance Writers’ Romantic Book of the Year.

Harking back to days gone by, Marie Bjekle Petersen (1874-1969) was a Danish-born writer and Lindisfarne resident who wrote nine romance novels set in Australia, mostly in rural Australia. Think you’ve heard that name before? You’re right – Marie’s nephew was one-time Queensland premier, Joh Bjelke-Petersen. A devout Christian, Marie’s novels still celebrated Australian egalitarianism and promoted women’s rights. Try snuggling up to one of her titles such as The Captive Singer (1917), The Immortal Flame (1919) or Jewelled Nights (1923). She sold more than 250,000 copies of her books – a phenomenal achievement for an Australian writer at that time.

Richmond writer Rachael Treasure also fancies rural life – she lives on an 8ha property where she combines her love of the environment with her passion for agriculture by exploring regenerative farming techniques. Rachael is a romance aficionado, but she also smartly tackles bigger issues like feminism, renewable energy and rural depression. She’s also been known to sell her books at Agfest and at various ute musters interstate. One of her novels, Cleanskin Cowgirls, proves why rural romance is becoming such a popular genre: ‘You ungrateful girl! Why did you take your hair down? You look like a tramp now.’ Irritated, her mother fished under the bed for Elsie’s recently kicked-off new shoes. ‘It’s so silly of the school to schedule events at this time of year, with harvest and shearing on for many people. And now your father, organising an important dinner to talk about council matters, like the upgrade of the sewage works. He expects so much of me! How can I be expected to drop you at the hall and serve the entrée?’

http://www.tasmanianwriters.org

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Hey There Mister Prime Minister

jj earthschild
11.02.15 5:55 am

Hey There Mister Prime Minister

(When you offered knighthood to the consort of the crown
were you dreaming up employment as the commonwealth clown?)

Hey there mister prime minister
your behaviour at first was rather sinister
If I wanted to be governed by secrets and lies
I’d go back to where they celebrate the 4th of July
and if I felt like living with hypocrisy
I’d support the way you treat those
who try to flee from governments far worse than yours
but you’re embarrassing us so-o-o-o-ohhhh
We’ve got to keep you on your toes

Hey there mister prime minister
your behaviour is absurd if slightly sinister
We all know this country is surrounded by a moat -
you and I or our ancestors all arrived here in a boat
and not one of the first people
ever tried to turn those boats around
I bet they regret it by now

Hey there mister prime minister
I know a true blue Aussie is not meant to whinge
but you’re behaviour has brought about whole new cultural cringe
We all know denial ain’t no river in Egypt
yet climate change – you refuse to believe it
Between fracking, and exporting all our coal
you sold the Reef down the river
and that’s like selling off our soul.

It’s true those people smugglers didn’t stand a chance
against a tough little man with an exhibitionistic stance
and Tony there are some who still might like ya
if you’d just quit smuggling budgies in your lycra
(we learned a thing or two from you before Julia got the axe
about smearing prime ministers by referring to their sex)
And if you’d been a bit more kind to the desperate in the sea
it’d be easier to forgive you when you repeatedly
land yourself and us in global disgrace
As it is you’re a laughing stock and a serious loss of face
is diplomatic suicide in Asia
Your nose is brown our face is red and though we tried to replace ya
I guess we’ll have to muddle along with you still on top
but next time your ego takes control
can someone make you STOP!

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Books | Poetry

Dear Hodgy

jj earthschild
11.02.15 5:53 am

Dear Hodgy
It seems a little dodgy
When aided and Abetzded
by the cronies you love best
that you’re taking on the entire convention
of World Heritage and state that your intention
is to make our wilderness a place
where you can wreck Creation

Dear Hodgy
You are not God –
gee! if you were
I might concur
that to say a word against you
would be to blaspheme
you know what I mean?
but if you were God –gee!
you’d scarcely need to sue me
You could simply shoot a thunderbolt
right through me

Dear Hodgy
With all due respect
I expect
that all this power has gone right to your head
Are you aware that pretty soon we’ll all be dead?
And you and your ol’ boys club will be remembered
for the way you took Tasmania and dismembered
democracy, agreements and international law
claiming that your state is so pathetically poor
that you had to leave integrity behind
subsidising loggers to cut down what is not mined
Then adding to the shame of genocide and extinction
will be your own face enshrined amongst
the irretrievably lost
with a small sign beneath that says
“He forgot to count the true cost”

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Arts | Poetry

Forthcoming travel memoir, The Boatman (Transit Lounge Publishing)

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media
09.02.15 1:57 pm

The six years John Burbidge spent in India as a community development worker changed him in many ways, but one stands out from all the rest. It led him to confront a deeply personal secret - his attraction to his own sex. A complicating factor in his journey of self-discovery was the tightly knit community in which he lived and worked, with its highly regimented schedule and minimal privacy that forced him to live a double life.

Written with passion, integrity and humour, The Boatman (Transit Lounge $29.95) is packed with incident, anecdote, adventure and above all, real and memorable people. Burbidge takes hold of India as few have done before, deftly interweaving the search for selfhood with an intimate exploration of Indian life and society. His story shows us how, when we dare to immerse ourselves in a culture radically different from our own, we may discover parts of ourselves we never knew existed.

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Flanagan’s island

SKY DYLAN-ROBBINS, New Yorker
09.02.15 6:00 am

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Pic by Matthew Newton, http://matthewnewton.com.au/Commercial/People/1/

About an hour from its capital, Hobart, to Kettering, and then ferry across a narrow bay, you will arrive at the small, green, and very lush island of Bruny. It’s home to just a few hundred people. Richard Flanagan, the novelist, spends much of his time there, writing in his “shack.” The Internet connection is appalling, but Flanagan likes it that way. He takes breaks on the water, often in a kayak. When he spends long stretches of time there, Flanagan’s wife and daughters, with whom he lives in Hobart, sometimes visit.

“There are no distractions; in the end all that stands between me and writing the book I wish to write is my own mediocrity and complete lack of talent,” he says. This is, of course, very much not true: his most recent novel, “The Narrow Road to the Deep North,” brought him the 2014 Man Booker Prize for Fiction. Joel Tozer, an Australian video producer, and Daniel Hartley-Allen, an Australian cinematographer, toured the Bruny shack and spoke to Flanagan about drifting in and out of the world of the novel.

Watch here

Also in The New Yorker: Richard Flanagan’s Way with Intimacy

• Jason Steger, Bookmarks, The Age:

Man Booker judging panel chairman A.C. Grayling has defended Richard Flanagan’s winning novel, The Narrow Road to the Deep North. after poet and critic Michael Hofmann gave it a savaging in The London Review of Books.

Hofmann, who is also translator of Australian novelist Joseph Roth, one of Flanagan’s favourites, said the Booker winner was “all bite and no chew”.

Now Grayling has hit back, suggesting the review was written “on a bad haemorrhoid day ... either Hofmann cannot read, or he has such a narrow and fantastical notion of what a novel should be that he is unable to see quality when it hits him in the face.

“I plump for the former, as witness the very passages he cites in attempted condemnation: one would fail a first-year for missing the point so comprehensively,”

The chances are Michael Williams will be asking Flanagan about all this when he interviews him at the Wheeler Centre on February 19.

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Beyond the Myth of Self Esteem

Karina Woolrich, Acorn Press
05.02.15 4:15 am

John Smith’s new book, Beyond the Myth of Self-Esteem, is a powerful critique of our society’s addiction to the belief that self-esteem is the key to a happy, successful life.

Author and broadcaster Sheridan Voysey writes that ‘John Smith exposes this pervasive Western myth for what it is - captivating, but vacuous.’

John Smith is an international speaker, the author of a number of books and the founder of both God’s Squad and the welfare and advocacy organisation Concern Australia.

Beyond the Myth of Self Esteem is the fruit of many year’s work, which not only systematically demolishes the myth of self-esteem, but provides solutions.

One of the most powerful chapters in the book is called Finding Identity and Meaning, and highlights the impact of positive role models on our lives.

Beyond the Myth of Self-Esteem retails for $24.95 and is available from http://www.acornpress.net.au

Download:

Smith_NBI_Acorn_Press.docx

Renshaw_NBI_Acorn_Press.docx

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New book explores the history of the Victorian Aborigines Advancement League

Scott Eathorne, Quikmark Media
04.02.15 12:33 pm

Fighting Hard (Aboriginal Studies Press, $39.95), provides fascinating insights into one of Australia’s most remarkable organisations – the oldest Aboriginal organisation in Australia, as told by former and current members.

Begun originally as a coalition of all Australians, a black power takeover in 1969 changed the management of the Victorian Aborigines Advancement League to one of Aboriginal community control. From the 1970s community heroes like Bob Maza, Doug Nicholls, Bill Onus and Bruce McGuinness became national heroes and role models for Aboriginal youth.

The League influenced the fight for civil rights and took a stand against the government’s assimilation policy. Its activism predates the better-known Tent Embassy and provided a Victorian, national and international perspective on Aboriginal affairs.

Since 1957 the League has provided a voice for Indigenous people, both as a welfare and activist body, spawning a diverse range of other organisations. Its activities have ensured the preservation of Aboriginal culture and heritage.

The League’s good governance dispels the pervasive myth that Aboriginal people cannot manage their own organisations. Fighting Hard is an essential read for those with an interest in Australian history and the place of Aboriginal culture on the national stage.

Author & historian Richard Broome is widely recognised as an authority on Aboriginal history in Australia and previous books include Aboriginal Victorians (2005), A Man of All Tribes: The Life of Alick Jackomos (2006) and Aboriginal Australians, which has remained in print since 1981 and sold more than 55,000 copies.

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Beyond the Myth of Self-Esteem

http://www.acornpress.net.au
03.02.15 6:34 am

John Smith’s new book, Beyond the Myth of Self-Esteem, is a powerful critique of our society’s addiction to the belief that self-esteem is the key to a happy, successful life.

Author and broadcaster Sheridan Voysey writes that ‘John Smith exposes this pervasive Western myth for what it is - captivating, but vacuous.’

John Smith is an international speaker, the author of a number of books and the founder of both God’s Squad and the welfare and advocacy organisation Concern Australia.

Beyond the Myth of Self Esteem is the fruit of many year’s work, which not only systematically demolishes the myth of self-esteem, but provides solutions.

One of the most powerful chapters in the book is called Finding Identity and Meaning, and highlights the impact of positive role models on our lives.

Beyond the Myth of Self-Esteem retails for $24.95 and is available from http://www.acornpress.net.au

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