Books

New Work Highlights Our Evolving Knowledge of Tasmania’s Unique Geology

Paul Harriss, Minister for Resources
01.10.14 7:42 pm

A new book seeks to unlock the mysteries of Tasmania’s rich geology and provide a springboard for our next generation of young geologists.

One hundred and twenty-six years after the first text book on Tasmanian geology was published in 1888, I was pleased today to officially launch “The Geological Evolution of Tasmania”.

The new book, edited by Dr Keith Corbett, Professor Patrick Quilty and Dr Clive Calver, summarises what we have learned since Burrett and Martin’s “Geology of Tasmania” was published in 1989.

This is a comprehensive update on Tasmania’s geology, showcasing the new discoveries and many advances in earth sciences over the past 25 years and providing a new insight into our unique place in the world.

Included in this work is the 3D modelling of our State developed by Mineral Resources Tasmania, which is now entering an exciting new age of refinement as it offers potential commercial dividends.

Geology is an exciting science with a long way to go and a lot to offer for Tasmania.

We know our State has some of the most highly mineralised land on the planet and we have every reason for confidence that mining will make just as big a contribution in the future as it has in the past and is in the present.

“The Geological Evolution of Tasmania” will help to inspire a new generation of geologists who will make the next ore discoveries to keep our industry strong.

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Paralympian Ian Simpson pens ‘humorous’ memoir

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
01.10.14 6:44 pm

Paralympian Ian Simpson pens ‘humorous’ memoir, details sporting success & hopes to inspire others

A spinal injury at a young age might have killed off a career in stand-up, but it did not temper Ian Simpson’s philosophy of not taking life too seriously.

In Rolling with the Punches (Short Stop Press, November, $24.99), Ian shares his unique life story, from representing Australia in table tennis at the Paralympics and wheelchair rugby at two world championships, to his career as a history teacher and learning designer.

Having spent most of his life in a wheelchair hasn’t been without its challenges, but Ian is living proof that a sense of humour can be one of our greatest assets. Rolling with the Punches is an honest and often very funny memoir from an inspiring man who chooses to make the most of life, no matter the circumstances.

Ian Simpson is now available or interview. He has spent most of his 49 years living in a wheelchair, giving him a different perspective on life to a lot of people. He is a Paralympian and has represented Australia in table tennis and wheelchair rugby.

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Tasmanian Poetry Festival and Carmen Keates

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
30.09.14 5:34 pm

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This weekend the Tasmanian Poetry Festival comes to Launceston, packed with poetry events.

Friday 3 Oct:
6.30 - Words on Water aboard the Tamar Odyssey
8 pm - Friday Night Readings at Hotel Launceston
Saturday 4 Oct:
11 am - Readings at Fullers Bookshop
2 pm - art:WORDS at Sawtooth Gallery
7.30pm - Launceston Poetry Cup at Seaport
Sunday 5 Oct:
1pm - Gunner Read Poems! at the Gunners Arms Hotel
Program and information about participating poets here. 

Leap into Poetry

with Carmen Leigh Keates

Have you ever read a poem that started in one place yet ended up somewhere completely unpredictable and wondered how the poet came up with the idea? You will come away from this workshop with a powerful poem that is true to your own life and individuality.
Carmen is a special guest at this year’s Tasmanian Poetry Festival, and offers this workshop as part of a one-week residency following the Festival. Workshop and booking details here.
When: Sunday, 12 October, 10am-4pm
Where: Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart
Cost: $88 for members ($120 non-members)
Carmen will be staying at the Kelly St Cottage for a residency after the Tasmanian Poetry Festival. She will be available to meet local poets for coffee and a chat during the week - contact the TWC office if you’d like to arrange a meeting. 

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Announcing the Erica Bell Foundation Literature Award

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
30.09.14 3:37 pm

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The Tasmanian Writers’ Centre is very proud to be associated with this new award, offering $10,000 for an unpublished manuscript by a Tasmanian writer, in memory of Dr Erica Bell.

The Erica Bell Foundation was unveiled today, comprising of Tasmania’s largest annual cash prizes of $10,000 to be awarded to the winners of the Erica Bell Foundation Medical Research Award and the Erica Bell Foundation Literature Award.

Erica Bell Foundation founder and Erica’s husband, Dr Bastian Seidel, said the Foundation was established to celebrate excellence in literature and medical research in Tasmania and to honour the outstanding achievements of Erica Bell, by awarding annual cash prizes to an emerging novelist and an emerging medical researcher.

“The two awards represent the highest annual awards of their kind in Tasmania, with each winner receiving $10,000, each runner-up receiving $1,000, and the second runners-up receiving $500,” Dr Seidel said.

Tasmanian Writers’ Centre Director Chris Gallagher said she was thrilled to support the Erica Bell Foundation in announcing this new annual unpublished manuscript award for Tasmanian writers.

“The Writers’ Centre will oversee the judging process, awarding the prize to the most promising work and the one which will benefit most from this opportunity,’ Ms Gallagher said.

“I am also pleased to announce the judges for the 2014 Erica Bell Foundation Literature Award, Tasmanian writers Lian Tanner and Rohan Wilson.

“I would encourage Tasmania’s writers to be bold and ambitious….we look forward to receiving your manuscript.”

Applications for the Erica Bell Foundation Medical Research Award and the Erica Bell Foundation Literature Award open on 1 October and close on 31 October 2014.

See here for the full press release: http://www.tasmanianwriters.org/news/announcing-erica-bell-foundation-literature-award

Full details on how to enter your manuscript will appear on the foundation’s website - http://ericabellfoundation.org/ - soon.

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Excellence in Tasmania’s creative and academic endeavours to be honoured ...

Lucinda Bray, Font
30.09.14 11:18 am

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... in memory of Dr Erica Bell

Such was the impact the late Dr Erica Bell had on Tasmania’s medical and literary world, her
husband has established a Foundation in her name to celebrate excellence in Tasmanian literature
and medical research.

The Erica Bell Foundation was unveiled today, comprising of Tasmania’s largest annual cash prizes of
$10,000 to be awarded to the winners of the Erica Bell Foundation Medical Research Award and the
Erica Bell Foundation Literature Award.

Erica Bell Foundation founder and Erica’s husband, Dr Bastian Seidel, said the Foundation was
established to celebrate excellence in literature and medical research in Tasmania and to honour the
outstanding achievements of Erica Bell, by awarding annual cash prizes to an emerging novelist and
an emerging medical researcher.

“The two awards represent the highest annual awards of their kind in Tasmania, with each winner
receiving $10,000, each runner-up receiving $1,000, and the second runners-up receiving $500,” Dr
Seidel said.

“I wanted to create the Erica Bell Foundation to both honour and recognise excellence in the two
disciplines in which Erica was both passionate about, and excelled in – that being academia and
literature.

“Erica published over 100 academic research papers and five books during her 10 years at the
University of Tasmania, as well as publishing two historical novels.

“Her first novel, The Voyage of the Shuckenoor, was launched at the 2008 Melbourne Writers
Festival, while her second novel Enzam and the Just Prince was published just one week before her
sudden passing in July 2014.

“Erica also worked at the cutting edge of medical research and was deeply committed to her
academic work and the state of Tasmania. She was working as an Associate Professor at the Wicking
Dementia Research and Education Centre at the University of Tasmania at the time of her passing,
aged 52.

“I have been overwhelmed by the support I have received in establishing the Foundation so soon
after Erica’s passing.

“We have been successful in attracting a highly competent and dedicated governance board and an
incredible list of high profile Tasmanians to sit on the judging panels to select the best and brightest.

“Importantly, the Erica Bell Foundation Medical Research Award is supported in-kind by the
University of Tasmania (Faculty of Health), while the Erica Bell Foundation Literature Award is
supported in-kind by The Tasmanian Writers’ Centre.”

Tasmanian Writers’ Centre Director Chris Gallagher said she was thrilled to support the Erica Bell
Foundation in announcing this new annual unpublished manuscript award for Tasmanian writers.

“The Writers’ Centre will oversee the judging process, awarding the prize to the most promising
work and the one which will benefit most from this opportunity,’ Ms Gallagher said.

“I am also pleased to announce the judges for the 2014 Erica Bell Foundation Literature Award,
Tasmanian writers Lian Tanner and Rohan Wilson.

“The journey to creating an inspiring novel can be so very challenging. It requires you to be very
tenacious, have time, space and inspiration and just the right kind of support. Tasmania offers many
of these things and now there is extra incentive and assistance.

“Just as Hannah Kent benefited from the national unpublished manuscript award for Burial Rites, a
Tasmanian writer has access to the same opportunity. We have many talented writers and this
award will really make a difference.

“I would encourage Tasmania’s writers to be bold and ambitious….we look forward to receiving your
manuscript.”

Applications for the Erica Bell Foundation Medical Research Award and the Erica Bell Foundation
Literature Award open on 1 October and close on 31 October 2014.

For more information about the Erica Bell Foundation or to submit your application please visit
http://www.ericabellfoundation.org or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

The inaugural winners of the Erica Bell Foundation awards will be announced at ceremony on to be
held on Hobart on Friday, 5 December 2014.

Download Overview and Fact Sheet:
Erica_Bell_Foundation_overview.pdf
TAS_Erica_Bell_Foundation_launch_FACT_SHEET.pdf

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New ‘Little Rhymes’ children’s picture book

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
30.09.14 10:58 am

New ‘Little Rhymes’ children’s picture book helps littlies learn about different animals.

In the upcoming children’s picture book, Little Rhymes for Little People (December 2014, $19.99) author John Stewart Westlake has crafted an enchanting collection of rhymes that aim to educate children about the different kinds of animals & other land and sea creatures.

The book, which features beautiful colour illustrations from Sophie Scahill, contains twenty-one illustrated rhymes, each one about a different kind of animal or sea creature. Children will be delighted and amused by the rhymes, and the illustrations create a unique world where they get to learn more about the animals that roam this earth. Suited for readers aged 3-7, Little Rhymes for Little People is the perfect gift for youngsters and families this Christmas.

Author and grandfather of five, John Westlake,  is a retired lawyer based in Sydney. He has always enjoyed language and regards simple rhyming poetry as an excellent and enjoyable way for small children to discover the use of language. For the past two years John has been learning Mandarin, both in Sydney and in China. For a review copy or to speak with John please contact me.

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Excellence in Tasmania’s creative and academic endeavours ...

Lucinda Bray
29.09.14 3:09 pm

... to be honoured in memory of Dr Erica Bell

Such was the impact the late Dr Erica Bell had on Tasmania’s medical and literary world, her husband has
established a Foundation in her name to celebrate excellence in Tasmanian literature and medical research.

The Erica Bell Foundation will be unveiled tomorrow, comprising of Tasmania’s largest annual cash prizes of
$10,000 to be awarded to the winners of the Erica Bell Foundation Medical Research Award and the Erica Bell
Foundation Literature Award.

Erica Bell Foundation founder and Erica’s husband, Dr Bastian Seidel, said the two awards represented the
highest annual awards of their kind in Tasmania, with each winner receiving $10,000, each runner-up receiving
$1,000, and the second runners-up receiving $500.

“Erica published over 100 academic research papers and five books during her 10 years at the University of
Tasmania, as well as publishing two historical novels,” Dr Seidel said.

“Her first novel, The Voyage of the Shuckenoor, was launched at the 2008 Melbourne Writers Festival, while
her second novel Enzam and the Just Prince was published just one week before her sudden passing in July
2014.

“Erica also worked at the cutting edge of medical research and was deeply committed to her academic work
and Tasmania. She was working as an Associate Professor at the Wicking Dementia Research and Education
Centre at the University of Tasmania at the time of her passing, aged 52.”

The Erica Bell Foundation is supported in-kind by the University of Tasmania (Faculty of Health) and the
Tasmanian Writers’ Centre.

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The Softwell Man

Christopher Nagle, writing.com
29.09.14 3:15 am

A vision of a future that anticipates some kind of secular response to the currently collapsing of existential software infrastructure, the social commons and its governance in favour of market forces ...

How could it come to this
that even crunching slippers
on gravelled path seemed loud
and full of fury
reminders
of that last and awful meeting
on floor fifty-two?

Read more, writing.com HERE

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The Suburban Captivity of the Church

Karina Woolrich, Acorn Press
28.09.14 10:27 am

The Suburban Captivity of the Church: Contextualising the Gospel for Post-Christian Australia is the title of a new book launched at Ridley Melbourne on September 22.

It was written by Ridley College Vice Principal, Tim Foster, who suggests that ..

‘Contextualisation is about bringing the gospel into critical engagement with the cultural narratives that shape us, and framing the gospel as an alternative story to live by.’

In launching the book the senior minister of St Jude’s, Carlton, Richard Condie, said ...

‘the book is full of insights, historical facts and astute cultural observations, that makes you kick yourself for not seeing them sooner. I particularly like the section in the very last pages, that push you to do the cultural analysis yourself, with a series of questions for discussion.’

Mr Condie said The Suburban Captivity of the Church is ‘an invaluable tool in working on Mission Action Plan, or church strategy document. This is an important book, because of its contribution to contemporary Australian missiology.’

Copies are available from Koorong Books or direct from the Acorn Press website at http://www.acornpress.net.au

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The Flan Man cleans up in WA

Lindsay Tuffin
24.09.14 11:19 am

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He may not have won the Miles Franklin ( Birds are singing as Evie Wyld wins the Miles Franklin ) but he sure cleaned up at the WA Premier’s Book Awards.

Here’s the report ( HERE ) and here:</b>

22 September 2014 - Winners announced for Premier’s Book Awards

Premier Colin Barnett announced Richard Flanagan as the winner of the Premier’s Prize at the Premier’s Book Awards for his work The Narrow Road to the Deep North.

Mount Lawley-based novelist Yvette Walker received the Western Australian Emerging Writers Award for her first book, Letters to the End of Love.

Mr Barnett said 11 of Australia’s top authors and two illustrators were recognised in this year’s awards. The winners will share $130,000 in prize money.

“The Premier’s Book Awards recognise literary excellence and I would like to congratulate all of this year’s winners,” he said.

“Literature is an important element of a culturally rich society. Reading and understanding the written word is not only empowering, it can be life changing. These awards help to encourage more West Australians to pick up a book.”

“Each year the awards receive hundreds of entries from authors across Australia and this year was no different. I am thrilled that two of the world’s finest literary talents, Richard Flanagan and Tim Winton, have been recognised in this year’s awards.”

Culture and the Arts Minister John Day said the inaugural Western Australian Emerging Writers category received 14 entrants, testament to the abundance of talent in the State.

“I would like to congratulate first-time published author, Yvette Walker, who was selected from a strong list of Western Australian writers for her book about love and loss,” Mr Day said.

This year the Western Australian public voted Tim Winton’s Eyrie as their favourite nominated work and winner of the People’s Choice Award sponsored by The West Australian.
Western Australian Premier’s Book Awards - 2014 Category Winners:

Children’s Books (jointly awarded)

Light Horse Boy by Dianne Wolfer (Albany, WA)
Illustrator:  Brian Simmonds (Duncraig, WA)

The Swap by Jan Ormerod (VIC)
Illustrator: Andrew Joyner (SA)
Digital Narrative

AUTHENTIC IN ALL CAPS by Christy Dena (QLD)
Fiction

The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan (TAS)
Non-fiction

Boy, Lost: A Family Memoir by Kristina Olsson (QLD)
Poetry

Six Different Windows by Paul Hetherington (ACT)
Scripts

The Bull, the Moon and the Coronet of Stars by Van Badham (NSW)
Western Australian History Award

Kerry Stokes: Self-Made Man by Margaret Simons (VIC)
Western Australian Emerging Writers Award  

Letters to the End of Love by Yvette Walker (Mount Lawley, WA)
Writing for Young Adults  

Alex As Well by Alyssa Brugman (NSW)
Premier’s Prize

The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan (TAS)
People’s Choice Award presented by The West Australian

Eyrie by Tim Winton (WA)
For further information about the 2014 Awards check the website HERE

MEANWHILE ...

Stephen Romei, Literary Editor, The Australian: Nobel Prize in Literature judging process shrouded in mystery

EARLIER on Tasmanian Times ...

Senator John McCain on Twitter

Richard Flanagan lone Aussie on Booker longlist

Richard Flanagan shortlisted for the Man Booker prize

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The ASA Bulletin, September 2014

Australian Society of Authors
23.09.14 7:18 am

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Launch of Tim Foster’s The Suburban Captivity of the Church ...

Karina Woolrich ACORN PRESS
22.09.14 2:50 pm

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... Contextualising the Gospel for Post-Christian Australia

Launch details: Monday 22 September 2014
5.30 pm
Ridley College
170 The Avenue
Parkville VIC 3052

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Writing book & analytical thinking helped with depression ...

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
22.09.14 2:44 pm

... says ‘Travesty’ author Hayden Bradford!

When Melbourne man Hayden Bradford was diagnosed with depression in 2009,he was fired by his employer and told by various doctors to exercise his brain as much as possible to help retrain brain cells. And so he took their advice and wrote a novel, Travesty ($24.99, Dennis Jones & Associates), which is finally due for release in November.

Drawing on scenarios that made him laugh as a way to stimulate creativity, Hayden crafted the story of a 55 year old man named Travesty, still living with his parents, who has a sudden accident and gets delivered to Heaven. The ironic thing is, Travesty doesn’t believe in God. Travesty is a light hearted story, which is told with lots of humour. The writing of it has assisted with Hayden’s treatment. 

Working in line with what psychiatrists and neuron-psychologists have told him about retraining brain cells, Hayden has also developed a popular horse racing website based on his ex-military Intelligence analytical skills. This analysis also stimulates brain activity, and has made Hayden sought after for his insight into horse racing. Since the 1st January 2014, he has achieved a 78% return on profit. 

Living with depression is an ongoing battle, but it’s Hayden’s hope that by sharing his own story, others won’t feel alone. His book, Travesty, will be available 1 November at all good book stores and online.

Hayden Bradford is now available for interview. He is an ex-stockman, ex-military man, and ex-corporate man, after being fired when he told his employer he had depression. Hayden is one of many Australians who battle depression, and is now classed as treatment resistant. He lives in Melbourne with his wife and two children. For more information visit http://www.haydenbradford.com.au

Scott Eathorne
Quikmark Media
38 Warrs Avenue
Preston South, VIC 3072
Ph: 0418 475 801
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au

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Hobart Bookshop: Lynette Finch’s Fixing Antarctica: Mapping the Frozen South

Hobart Bookshop
18.09.14 5:40 pm

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The Hobart Bookshop is pleased to invite you to celebrate the launch of Lynette Finch’s Fixing Antarctica: Mapping the Frozen South.

When: Thursday October 2, 5.30pm
Where: The Hobart Bookshop

Fixing Antarctica tells the story of Syd Kirkby, an extraordinary modern day explorer who mapped vast tracks of Antarctica. In 1956, in the height of the cold war, Syd joined fourteen scientists who spent fifteen months on an isolated rock outcrop at the edge of the Antarctic plateau. Mawson station was Australia’s first continental station and is now the longest continuously operating settlement inside the Antarctic Circle.

Over the next twenty years Syd Kirkby explored and mapped more unknown regions in the world than any other person in history.

Fixing Antarctica is the first full biography of this important twentieth century explorer. Told through interviews with his contemporaries, personal diaries and the diaries of other Antarctic explorers, this account establishes Kirkby in his rightful place as one of the great polar explorers.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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The Suburban Captivity of the Church

Karina Woolrich ACORN PRESS
16.09.14 12:36 pm

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The Suburban Captivity of the Church: Contextualising the Gospel for Post-Christian Australia

For far too long, Australian evangelicals have proclaimed a gospel loaded with the cultural baggage of suburbia: personal security, individual salvation and an other-worldly focus. Is this message really a set of timeless truths with universal application? Or have we injected Jesus’ message with our own values?

The Suburban Captivity of the Church calls us to venture beyond the picket fence and engage with the cultural narratives around us, to see how God’s big story meets them with both challenge and hope. Whether we are reaching a new culture, or trying to bring the gospel to our own in a more biblically faithful way, this book will equip us for the task.

Tim Foster has served as an ordained Anglican minister in both suburban and urban contexts. He has also worked as a youth minister and led the Training Division at Anglican Youthworks in Sydney. Tim later founded Youthworks College. His DMin (Fuller Seminary) focused on mission and church in the post-Christendom context.

Tim is currently Vice-Principal of Ridley College, Melbourne, where he teaches Practical Ministry and New Testament. He is married to Alison, and they have three children.

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Transportation: islands and cities: London writers announced

Transportation
12.09.14 10:30 am

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Quarterly Essay 55, A Rightful Place

Anna Lensky, http://www.quarterlyessay.com
11.09.14 6:49 am

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Quarterly Essay 55, A Rightful Place
Race, Recognition and a More Complete Commonwealth
Noel Pearson

“We have a committed prime minister, and a committed opposition. We have a
receptive electorate. There will never be a better time. We have no choice but to
address the question. If constitutions deal with fundamental things, our
indigenous heritage is pretty fundamental.”—Professor Greg Craven

“As long as we have a constitution that characterises Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander peoples on the basis of race, it will have deleterious implications
for their citizenship. It must be removed … This is not just a matter of
symbolism. I think this will be a matter of psychology. The day we come to
regard ourselves as people with a distinct heritage, with distinct cultures and
languages but not of a distinct race will be a day of psychological liberation. And
it will also be liberating for those in the wider community …”
—Noel Pearson, A Rightful Place

As the government sets the timeline for us to decide if and how indigenous
Australians will be recognised in the constitution, Noel Pearson makes the case
for fundamental change. With a key report on constitutional recognition due to
government by 29 September, Pearson’s Quarterly Essay shows what
recognition means, and what it could make possible: true equality and a
renewed appreciation of an ancient culture.

In A Rightful Place, Noel Pearson shows how the idea of “race” was embedded
in the constitution, and the distorting effect this has had. Now there is a chance
to change it – if we can agree on a way forward. This is a wide-ranging, eloquent
call for justice, an essay of remarkable power that traverses history and culture.
The nation has unfinished business. After more than two centuries, can a
rightful place be found for the original peoples of the land?

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Noel Pearson is a lawyer and activist and chairman of
the Cape York Partnership. He has published many essays and
newspaper articles, as well as the book Up from the Mission
(2009). His previous Quarterly Essay was the acclaimed Radical
Hope: Education and Equality in Australia.

Quarterly Essay • Also available in ebook

Noel Pearson will deliver a
public lecture on race and
recognition at the
Sydney Opera House on
Thu 11 September at 7:30pm

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A unique and heartbreaking account of five sons who fought in The Great War

Sharon Evans, Big Sky Publishing - Marketing & Communications, http://www.bigskypublishing.com.au
10.09.14 6:32 am

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Allison Marlow Paterson’s new book Anzac Sons, The Story of Five Brothers in the War to End all Wars (Big Sky Publishing, RRP $34.99) provides a heartbreaking account told through over 500 letters, of six brothers, five who fought in WW1, four of whom served in the same company of the 38th battalion. A unique first hand perspective of life on the battlefield and the lives of the family and communities left behind.

Anzac Sons reads like a movie script, six brothers, five go to war, four in the same battalion, one at home to look after farm and family.  Tragedy and loss, stoicism on the battlefield and at home, a mothers heartache, and a young girl who decades later rescues the letters of her great uncles and grandfather from the aging old family home and sets out to tell her family’s story. In doing so captures the essence of a nation faced with shocking carnage on a scale never before encountered.

Written by Australian author Allison Marlow Paterson this is the story of her grandfather and his five brothers, over 500 letters they wrote home from the trenches in World War 1 create the foundation of this Victorian family’s story.  Allison wrote Anzac Sons for her great-grandmother – Sarah Marlow – often mentioned in the boy’s letters, a mother far from her much loved sons, and who it is said died of a broken heart.

This book is not just a family’s story of loss and ‘pushing through’ adversity but also of a time when family and communities where swept with sadness from the loss of so many of their young men and the very real issue of how would they ‘get on’ without them.

Gallipoli may have been where Australian soldiers began their campaign but the Western Front where the long hard push began, battles where thousands of men would die, and the Anzacs soldiers whose bravery, humour and skill was honed under horrific conditions.

Anzac Sons is an engaging, page-turner of a book and the story of how Allison came to right this book is equally fascinating. Written initially to honour her great-grandmother, who died of a ‘broken heart’, it has become so much more. While Anzac Sons is a family history it is also a story of a community with national significance. It is told in the words of the young men and narrated by a family member with the insight and emotion which that brings.

http://www.bigskypublishing.com.au

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Friends Meeting House, 2pm Sun 14 Sept: James Boyce in conversation with James Charlton

Bloomsbury Publishing
09.09.14 4:34 am

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Books | What's On

Poet’s Manor

Paula Xiberras
09.09.14 3:52 am

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I am surprised when as we chat, Josephine Pennicott tells me it has been two years since we last spoke in person in Hobart. Josephine gets back to Tasmania at least once a year and is a former Tassie girl (who has also lived in Papua New Guinea) growing up in Oatlands, attending Oatlands Primary and High School and establishing a nursing career in Hobart.

Josephine tells me she loves ‘Beautiful Hobart’,‘the landscape’ and ‘the beautiful purity of air that hits you as soon as you arrive’, not forgetting the ‘pink eyed potatoes’, ‘the definition of the seasons’ and of course ‘MONA’.

Josephine always thought she would make her home in the Tassie bush or country but it didn’t work out that way and she has found herself living in Sydney for 20 years!

Her novel’ Poets Cottage’ was an appropriate title as the name Pennicott means’enclosure’ or’cottage’.  Set in Stanley, the story is ‘dictated’ and revolves around a Gothic house with its image of girls playing outside the house opening the novel with Josephine’s storytelling talent telling us something is wrong with the picture, with the house’s cellar holding sinister secrets of the fate of the two girls’ mother.

Similarly, an image of a young blonde girl running near a lake informed the opening of Josephine’s new novel ‘Currawong Manor’. The two books were inspired by Josephine’s interest in new age cinema and films such as ‘Don’t look Now’ and’ Picnic at Hanging Rock’.
The recurring image of innocence in the young girls is a juxtaposition for the less than innocent activities going on in the novels.

Josephine’s latest novel ‘Currawong Manor’ has the beautiful Blue Mountains landscape as the background rather than the house dominated story of ’ Poet’s Cottage’ and is inspired in part by Josephine’s time as an art student in the Blue Mountains. The book details Australian artistic life with models and mystery!

Josephine’s writing influences are Agatha Christie and Daphne Du Maurier for the crime and mystery content and some Enid Blyton for the very English feel to the time periods she visits cleverly interwoven with mysteries unravelled in the present day.

The opening of ‘Currawong Manor’ with its title referencing the sinister birds that inhabit the manor tells us’the bush keeps its secrets’ and for now it’s probably wise to do just that.

Currawong Manor is out now published by Pan Macmillan.

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What was the best moment of your life?

Diane Caney.
08.09.14 8:45 am

• In his story about swimming with dolphins in the River Derwent ... (read more beneath dolphin pic)

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Photograph Courtesy of Duncan Giblin, Stormboy Photos, http://www.stormboyphotos.com

In his story about swimming with dolphins in the River Derwent, Les Harris says that his time in the water with the wild dolphins stood out as the highlight of his life. His story is incredibly beautiful. In case you missed it, here is Les’s story, Falling for a Pod of Dolphins.

Before he passed away in June 2013, Les asked his family to set up a short-story competition to be awarded to a story about something very dear to his heart - the waters in and around his beloved Tasmania.

Entries opened in May 2014, and were judged by his family ready for a Father’s Day announcement.

Congratulations to the Winners of the Les Harris Short Story Competition, 2014:

First Prize: Ben Walter for his story The Face of the Derwent: Read HERE

Second Prize: Tim Slade for his story Mum’s Morris Major: Read HERE

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Wise Weiss

Paula Xiberras
04.09.14 7:38 am

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Author Rachael Weiss has never been to Tasmania and lists it and Darwin as two places in Australia she is yet to and wants to visit. Rachael says she would love to explore the natural side of Tasmania, including Cradle Mountain. One of the reasons Rachael hasn’t got around to visiting Tasmania is she has been living outside of Australia, including for a time in Prague, the home city of her Father and it is that city that is the subject of Rachael’s memoir ‘The Thing about Prague’.

Familial links to Prague means Rachael has visited that city before but there came a time some years ago when she decided she would relocate to Prague for an extended period to write a book.In spite of familial ties Rachael had no advantages in settling there, for one, she is not being fluent in the language. In fact the process of moving to Prague was disruptive. Rachael arrived there as an immigrant starting from scratch but with no end of material for her writing.

There was no job waiting for her and Rachael stretched herself by taking on numerous and sometimes quirky jobs including becoming an astrology writer and travel writer. Rachael found the astrology writing a lot of fun but soon saw herself on the outer when she actually told people at parties that she well,‘made it all up’.

Another duty Rachael bravely took on was becoming a singer at the local Spanish Synagogue, something she had always desired to do. It was a way of ‘anchoring herself into community life’ where she says it ‘was all hands to the wheel’ and it mattered little that her service renditions were not perfect as most of the attendants were tourists and just grateful to find and be enfolded in the community of the Synagogue. Rachael says there may have been some embarrassing occasions but nobody cared.  Landing on her feet, Rachael revelled in going outside the square to do things she ‘wasn’t ready’ to do. One thing Rachael was ready for was romance and the memoir details her adventures in the amorous (sometimes the scary as well!)

On her travels Rachael did meet fellow Australian author and part time Prague resident, fantasy author, Isabelle Carmody, when both were taking their books to a bookstore.

And the Aussie girls had more in common than imagined because while Isabelle’s books are fantastical, Rachael’s are firmly set in reality, although with her experiences in the magical city of Prague albeit a slightly heightened reality!

Charles Bridge has notches in it that mark the various floods that have visited the city since they began in the eighteenth century some of them of ‘enormity’. Racheal tells me there was a flood proof metre system devised by the communists but when it came to the time to turn the switch, it was discovered it hadn’t been installed. Rachael says this in indicative of how things were delayed under that government system.

Rachael, when I spoke to her, was in Australia on a promotional visit but was soon to return to her new place of residence, Dublin. Just previous to Dublin she had a four year stint in Sheffield. She plans to settle in Dublin for a while and write a book on that city or perhaps one on Sheffield. It is the life of the author, or at least this author, to experience and write in different cities. Rachael plans to stay in Dublin for a while before perhaps, returning to Prague for another visit and finally, to settle back in Australia.

Rachael’s book ‘The Thing about Prague’ is out now, published by Allen & Unwin.

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New historical memoir

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
04.09.14 7:36 am

New historical memoir traces three generations of a family, from the Russian Revolution in Moscow, WW2 and immigrating to Australia during the 1950’s.

A remarkable biography of historical relevance, Foresight and Perseverance (Short Stop Press, 15 October, H/B $39.99) tells the story of three generations of the Zinoffsky and Parret family, caught in the events of the first half of the 20th Century’s history and politics.

Primarily told through the eyes of a young girl of the third generation and the collective memory of the family, author Sylvia McNeall shares her family’s story in vivid detail, touching on the Russian Revolution in Moscow, displacement during World War ll, and living as refugees. It also provides an insight into this Estonian family immigrating to Australia during the 1950s in search of a safer place to raise their family.

A brave and compelling memoir peppered with humour, Foresight and Perseverance is a must read for those with an interest in world history.

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A Menapausal Mona-ment!

Paula Xiberras
02.09.14 7:23 am

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Some time ago I had the chance to talk to the wonderful Jean Kittson as she was on her way to a book signing for her latest book ‘Still Hot to Me’, an informative and mostly light hearted or should that be ‘heated’ look (’ botox is make up for under the skin’) at menopause.

Jean has strong connections to Tasmania with her ‘best friend in the world’, with whom she travelled the world, eventually set up home in Tasmania for five years and Jean remembers well, her visits to West Hobart during that time.

Jean says she still visits Tasmania at least 2 or 3 times a year and most recently was here in January speaking to Ophthalmologists as part of her role as spokesman for muscular degeneration, an issue close to her heart as her Mum has the condition. Jean is concerned with seeing and vision in a wider sense in that her aim is to help us see and clarify many issues, including in her recent book , helping men and women(to know themselves) and be aware of and how to manage their fertility and menopause .

Jean is keen to visit MONA and with its commitment to representations of bodily functions as Jean and I muse, there might be the opportunity to have a model of the female reproduction system installed there as Jean believes most people, especially women themselves, are ignorant of its appearance and tells me how she herself was surprised to know it is a ‘very vacuum packed area’. Perhaps no surprise there as a lot of women would vouch for ‘packing’ a lot of vacuuming into their lives!

Jean in fact, packs her book with many interesting facts such as ‘oestres’ affecting all parts of the body, even the eyes, evidenced by a symptom of menopause being dry eyes.

Jean’s conclusion is, in spite of all the modern technology and the help with and extensions of fertility it offers, there is ‘still the sobering thought that all are captive’ of this particular ‘biological trap’, that fertility, is ultimately finite and that’ mother nature’ is ‘old fashioned’ and hasn’t really kept up with the liberation of modern women or the advances of modern technology.

‘Still Hot to Me’ is out now, published by Pan Macmillan.

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Hobart Bookshop: A Compulsion to Kill

The Hobart Bookshop
01.09.14 11:56 am

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The Hobart Bookshop is pleased to invite you
to the launch, by Rob Valentine,
of Robert Cox’s new book

A Compulsion to Kill.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop
When: 5.30pm, Thursday September 18

Free event, all welcome.

A Compulsion to Kill is a dramatic chronological account of 19th-century Tasmanian serial murderers.
Never before revealed in such depth, the story is the culmination of extensive research and adept craftsmanship as it probes the essence of both the crimes and the killers themselves.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

What the Publisher says:

Anyone who thinks serial killing began with Jack the Ripper in England in 1888 will be shocked by the revelations in a new book.

Titled A Compulsion to Kill: The Surprising Story of Australia’s Earliest Serial Killers, it records seven cases of serial murder between 1807 and 1862, with a total of 33 victims.

Surprisingly, all the killings took place in sparsely populated Tasmania.

A Compulsion to Kill is the work of Hobart writer Robert Cox, author of two other books of Australian history and three collections of short stories.

“I’d written about a forgotten serial killer, Charles Routley, in a previous book,” Cox said, “and that piqued my curiosity about whether there were others.

“I started to look into it and was astonished at what I discovered— six other instances, all by escaped or former convicts.”

The first of them — and the first in Australia — were carried out in 1807 by little-known runaways named John Brown and Richard Lemon.

They killed three soldiers near Launceston and went on to kill a fellow fugitive and at least one Aborigine.

Better known was Alexander Pearce, the notorious cannibal convict.

He escaped from Macquarie Harbour penal settlement with seven others, but he was the sole survivor of the hazardous 150km trek to freedom.

Two of the escapees died of exhaustion, but all Pearce’s other companions were murdered and eaten.

Later, during a second escape from Macquarie Harbour, he butchered and consumed another runaway.

Emulating Pearce a few years later, a pair of convicts named Edward Broughton and Matthew McAvoy murdered and ate the flesh of three fellow fugitives from Macquarie Harbour.

Their particularly noisome contemporary Thomas Jeffrey (sometimes called Jeffries) was known as “The Monster”.

He was a rapist, sadist, cannibal and baby-killer.

After absconding with three others in December 1825, he was a party to five murders during a 40-day reign of terror.

His victims included of a five-month-old boy.

Shortly before his execution, he also confessed to being involved in a murder in England and two in NSW.

Another slayer of five men was the Irish convict John “Rocky” Whelan, who killed all his victims during a 24-day rampage in 1855.

The final chapter of A Compulsion to Kill is devoted to the Parkmount murders, a still-unsolved triple slaying in northern Tasmania in 1862.

Cox said the crime fascinates him because police twice had the likely killers, John Parker and Robert Sharman, in custody.

They were sent for trial both times but their trials were abandoned for lack of evidence, and no one was ever punished for the killings.

“Really, there was plenty of evidence pointing to their guilt,” Cox said, “especially their conflicting and frequently changing stories about where they were at the time of the murders.

“Better police work would have secured convictions, I think.”

A Compulsion to Kill, published by IP (Interactive Publications) under its Glass House Books imprint, is available in bookshops now.

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Deb Hunt-ing for Love and Non-Fictional Flying

Paula Xiberras
01.09.14 6:46 am

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In Shakespeare’s ‘Much Ado about Nothing’ his heroine Beatrice says:

‘You have stayed me in a happy hour I was about to protest I loved you and I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest’.

Deb hunt once played Beatrice in her ‘Shakespeare in the Park’ days when she lived in the UK. Deb also played many other Shakespearean heroines, such as Nerissa in ‘Merchant of Venice’ and Portia in ‘Julius Caesar’ before becoming her very own heroine in her own romance. As well as Shakespearean actor Deb has also forged careers as an events manager and as an English language teacher in Spain.

In addition to her busy and diverse work life Deb was hunting for a fantasy love for so long that when real love finally found her she did protest it, but like Beatrice came to realise her heart had nothing else to protest. For Deb it was a happy ending after pursuing an ideal notion of romance she instead was pursued by an ideal man, who won her by persistence.

Some time ago I called the wonderful Deb at her home but was greeted by her charming partner, the ‘love’ in her novel ‘Love in the Outback’.  I had missed Deb because, as she later told me, she was on her way to another appointment and was relaxing on a park bench with her morning cup of coffee when she was hit on the head with a football, completely unruffled she tells me the primary school children were very apologetic. This incident demonstrates Deb’s demeanour, unfazed by such hiccups and her adaptability, the major one being her settling on the other side of the world and in a demanding job with The Flying Doctors but she was inspired by people she met during her work, who had to overcome so much more such as natural disasters to rebuild their lives.

As part of working for The Flying Doctors Deb visited Tasmania and tells me she loves it here, intrigued by MONA, and most recently visiting Tassie to interview a lady farmer in the Meander Valley for a new book on Australian farmers.

Deb’s own book came about by chance when she was pitching a biography she was writing about someone else but after meeting with publishers was encouraged instead to write her own book because it was thought her story would resonate with readers.

Deb once called herself a ‘sinister stalking spinster’, a nod to her pursuit of unrequited love. Deb puts this down to growing up on fairy tales that promised happy ever after and being encouraged to continue to pursue the fairy-tale. Disenchanted with enchantment Deb decided to take up a job opportunity in Australia with The Flying Doctors. Metaphorically the job did some ‘doctoring’ on Deb, she healed and it gave her wings to fly both literally and metaphorically! The subsequent finding of love and relenting to it was the best decision she ever made and now she feels’ happy, settled and blessed’.

A resurgence has overtaken Deb with many ideas for future books including a children’s one that she started many years ago and would like to revisit are burgeoning.  There is also a desire to do a master’s degree in creative writing and make a return to journalism.

Now she and her partner are retired from their Flying Doctors work, Deb is a full time writer and there is time to take that trip to Jervis Bay with her partner and their beloved dog Maggie..

Deb’s book ‘love in the Outback’ is out now published by Pan Macmillan.

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Franchesca S-Mart-inez

Paula Xiberras
30.08.14 6:50 am

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The meaning of the name Francesca is ‘free’ and the Martinez name is derived from ‘Martinus’ which in turn derives from ’Mars’ the god of war, even though Francesca is very much a peace lover, she fights for values she believes in, such as freedom to find fulfilment outside of societies expectations. I was delighted to be given the opportunity to recently talk with this wonderful and talented young woman from her home in Britain.  A freedom from fulfilling societal expectations is very much a trademark of the beautiful Francesca Martinez, stand-up comedian, author and actor.

Although she is English born, Francesca is very multicultural. Francesca’s paternal grandparents are from Spain and there are Swedish links on her mum’s side, ironically, her mum also speaks fluent Spanish! Francesca also has links to Australia and, more importantly to Tasmania, in that her uncle formerly living in Perth has retired to the natural scenery of Hobart with ‘a home’, as Francesca so poetically puts it ‘licking the sea’.

Francesca is indeed no stranger to Australia herself, having completed 3 successive visits in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Francesca tells me she may tour again next year.

A self-confessed sun junky, when I spoke to Francesca she was just back from a sunny, hot two months in Gibraltar to have a ‘lovely’ escape from the British winter.

Francesca’s autobiography ‘what the **** is normal? ‘Discusses being born with Cerebral Palsy and her favoured name for it, ‘wobbly’ and how she is working on a world ‘wobbly revolution’.

Francesca’s is a beautiful autobiography that talks lovingly of family, the food prepared by her grandmother and her love of Spain, a place she hopes to eventually (many years in the future) retire to. Indeed, Francesca says one of the best things for her about the book is celebrating very publically her grandparents to the extent they have become well known like’ movie stars’ and ‘mythic figures’. She is happy to have had the chance to immortalise these very special people in literature.

Francesca’s main job may be comedy but she is also an experienced actor, starting her career in the children’s program Grange Hill. Francesca has never given up acting but ‘doesn’t wait by the phone’. She has on her wish list, a sitcom while she continues her career in stand-up. She says of stand-up although its daunting for some (everyone has talents they are naturally good at) and being a comedian, true to her name meaning ‘gives her a sense of ‘freedom’ she appreciates having no boss and not a’ 9 to 5 job in an office where you are staring at a lap top all day’.

Her parents supported her in pursuing her passion and following her dream, instead of encouraging her to find fulfilment in a job that provided money and security such as becoming a lawyer, which might cause one to ‘burn out in a few years’.

And this is all part of Francesca’s ‘wobbly revolution’, to do away with what society and culture perpetuates as who we should be and what we should want and aspire to. A young man called Dylan helped Francesca realise being confident and feeling beautiful comes from doing positive things and being happy with what you have rather than pine for what you haven’t got.

Francesca says to’ encourage passion’ and appreciate what we have, rather than have an ‘obsession’ over what we perceive we lack. Francesca gets angry about wasting any day with negative thoughts and would’ rather shift the perception’ in ‘gratitude for what we do have’.

Francesca’s book ‘what the **** is normal?’ is out now published by Random House.

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Hobart Bookshop: Leigh Swinbourne’s Away

The Hobart Bookshop
27.08.14 7:59 am

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The Hobart Bookshop and Ginninderra Press
are pleased to invite you to the launch of
Leigh Swinbourne’s

Away and Other Stories.

Where: The Hobart Bookshop
When: 5.30pm, Thursday September 11

All welcome to this free event.

The Hobart Bookshop
22 Salamanca Square
Hobart Tasmania 7000
ph 03 6223 1803 | fax 03 6223 1804
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
http://www.hobartbookshop.com.au

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New fiction book explores the unique relationship between twins

Scott Eathorne Quikmark Media W: http://www.quikmarkmedia.com.au
26.08.14 3:13 pm

Shane Willing has an identical twin brother, Barry. But why is it that Barry’s life is not dogged by the same crippling misfortune as his twin’s? Dual Carriageway (Sid Harta, 15 October, $24.95), is a fictional study of the unique relationships between twins – the implicit awareness, the shared chemistry and the peculiar differences.

Separated by distance but sharing similar goals at work and at play, the off-duty hours of the brothers are spiced up in humorous and saucy situations which pepper the novel. But when a twist of fate simultaneously steps into both their lives does it set in motion the possibility of a new start- or is it déjà vu?

Written by Melbourne author John Considine, Dual Carriageway is a fascinating and often very funny exploration of sibling struggles and relationship reversals where all is not what it appears to be.

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Science meets philosophy meets the humanities

Tasmanian Writers' Centre
21.08.14 6:57 am

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THE LARGER CONVERSATION
This Sunday August 24
Science meets philosophy meets the humanities.

GALLERY TEN - 71 Murray St, Hobart. Chaired by UTas Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Jeff Malpas…

Whose City? Sunday 24 August 2pm
Leigh Woolley - Architect
and Brian Risby - Urban Planner and policy advisor
Leigh Woolley is an Architect with over thirty years experience as an architectural and urban design practitioner, author and photographer. He is the recipient of numerous professional design awards across these disciplines.  He is a Churchill Fellow and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Architecture and Design UTAS. He practices from Hobart.

Brian Risby is one of Tasmania’s leading town planners, is the Director of Policy at the Tasmanian Planning Commission but is currently seconded to advise the Government and the Tasmanian Planning Reform Taskforce.  Brian holds a Masters Degree in Town Planning from the University of Tasmania and has many years of experience as a consultant planner and as a policy adviser to the State Government. He has held executive positions at both state and national levels with the Planning Institute of Australia.

Entry $5. TWC Members and full-time students free. Refreshments available

CHILDRENS BOOK WEEK 16-22 August ...

Read more about the Tasmanian Writers’ Centre activities here

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