Image for The Tarkine Coast – A Wildlife Refuge

*Pic: A lizard’s eye ...

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

Stretching for around 100 kilometres between West Point and Ahrberg Bay, the windswept coastline of the Tarkine holds some of the most dramatic coastal scenery in Tasmania (perhaps the world ...)

Bounded by sea-sculptured shorelines, grassy headlands, coastal scrub, forest, heathlands and the spectacular grand sand dunes, the extent of the Tarkine’s diverse coastal environment is rich in floristic biodiversity and abundant in native wildlife.

Many birds and animals thrive in this undeveloped enclave of wild earth. In fact the Tarkine is a crucial habitat for many species that have become subject to disease, loss of extensive habitat, and the questionable influences of human impacts upon the environment.

If there was such a place where the Thylacine could seemingly exist then the Tarkine may be it?

Whilst some parts of the Tarkine coastline in the past has seen grazing, basic farming and settlement, most of the region has witnessed little change since European settlement.

For the nature lovers the Tarkine coastline is an ideal sanctuary and refuge for many of our iconic wildlife species.

It is a unique landscape that urgently warrants full protection through the listing of a World Heritage area, and the proclamation of a well-managed National Park.

Here is a glimpse of some of the wildlife that can be observed along the coastline …

• Paul Tapp, in Comments Naturalists as Ted and camera bring us graphic depictions of otherwise hidden flora and fauna of the Tarkine through the pages of the TT. I am sending this article to our French friends, now living in WA. They not only will return, but could be persuaded to relocate to Tassie, as its natural beauty, notwithstanding their encounter with unthinking dog-owners, has been embedded in their memorable experiences, as a unique part of a diminishing world.