Image for TARKINE ... After The Fire ...

A completely alien landscape. Every thing has changed. I feel so out of place. Yet it is all strangely familiar ...

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The imagery is overwhelming. The regrowth green is nearly fluroscent against the muted ash tones ranging from pure white to pure black.

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The eye is drawn simultaneously to everything - the fore, mid, backgrounds and sky. On such a windy, spectaular blue sky day, with clouds fluffy and striated - the tones and lines and shapes completely contrasting each other again and again. Completely unsettled. Completely in disarray.

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Norfolk Range view from the north, with a dirtbiker taking it all in.

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Unburnt. Some things are just meant to live against all odds. I am astounded by the miraculous sparing of this one tree amongst the carnage.

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Regeneration from within.

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I love the show of strength in such delicate and graceful forms. The gentle, confident response to violent, brutal events is all the more inspiring.

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The road through the forest is a bit foreboding. The dead trees have been felled.

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Remaining green leaves hold hope for more renewal.

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View to Mt Holloway from the east. A lot of the midground will be burnt back to the gravel.

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Mt Mabel from the east. It is kinda freaking me out that Ive tried to summit this mountain so many times and failed due to thick, impenetrable banksia, teatree and bauera scrub only 200m from the top - and the fire has burnt in almost exactly the same route I have been picking away at. We both had the same route to the summit, only Fire did not tread lightly!

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Sometimes you nail the timing with the clouds and composition…so much to unpack in this image - the dollars spent by doing nothing, causing destruction. Messages emerge from a collusion of land and sky, and on the ground. When a picture tells a thousand words, and even more numbers? (Not Photoshopped!)

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Blechnum wattsii

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The living trees start their display

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These buds were just waiting for Fire to set them free

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Sprout!

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Mt Edith - no doubt grateful she didnt meet Fire again - still recovering from the scars of May 2015.

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Mt Norfolk - swathed in forest - remains untouched. The midground burnt back to gravel and bedrock. Again. I suspect this area has seen repeated burning through the millenia, including the mining communities who used fire to clear pathways in this once tampered landscape. It has regenerated itself repeatedly.

*Nicole Anderson is a wilderness photographer and explorer based in Northwest Tasmania. This corner of Tasmania contains tremendous biodiversity and natural values, much of it in the renowned Tarkine bio-region, which remain largely under-appreciated and unprotected. The habitat harbours several endangered, rare, threatened and vulnerable species, including that of the Rural Medical Practitioner – which is who Nicole actually is most of her time. Combining interests and skills in Biology, Emergency Medicine, Public Health, Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, Remote Area Search and Rescue with an awareness of the critical importance that healthy wilderness provides in ecosystem services to human welfare, Nicole has rediscovered photography as a medium to communicate such connections. This region has nurtured and sustained people for 40,000 years. Yet, our modern influences are turning it against us. For over a month, the Circular Head region was fumigated with toxic bushfire smoke from uncontrolled wilderness fires, some areas experienced only 3 clearish days in a whole month. There are lessons to be learnt in these recent disasters involving fires which caused massive environmental destruction and regional primary industry, tourism and economic interruption. These fires are actually still burning over 2 months later. We’ve ignored or forgotten how the Aboriginal people lived in more harmony with this landscape, and cared for it. Much of the vegetation will recover – but it will be a more flammable environment for next year. The health effects on people, their pets and livestock, and indeed the wild animals, will be affected for months and quite likely years in some cases. The European practice of clearing naturally fire-resistant rainforest for agriculture and forestry, especially fire-regenerated eucalypt predominance, will not fare well in a hotter, drier climate if public health and safety, and sustainable regional economic stability, are to be priorities.

• peter adams in Comments: And Forestry Tasmania will continue to carry their “sweat-slippery Bible” of outdated myth into the Easter burning season …

New move to protect Freycinet National Park Business owners, residents and shack owners are launching the Freycinet Action Network Facebook page as an information and networking hub for people concerned about the proper management and over development of the Freycinet National Park, such as new heli-tourism and the proposed expansion of RACT’s Lodge and its construction of a high-end caravan park. As a first post, the page will publish a graphic image of the true extent of the Hodgman Government’s plans to open the Coles Bay Visitor Services Zone to new commercial leases and tourism development …

TT MEDIA HERE where there are permanent links to what the Pollies say ...