Image for ‘It wasn’t a forced we need to go, rather a heartfelt other-worldly plea ... ’

Promenade des Anglais, Bastille Day 2016 ...

Promenade des Anglais in Nice post attack. Jazz festival cancelled, people in shock. Viva la France!

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That empty feeling ...

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Promenade des Anglais in Nice today post attack. Jazz festival cancelled, people in shock. Viva la France!

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Promenade des Anglais in Nice today post attack. Jazz festival cancelled, people in shock. Viva la France!

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Promenade des Anglais in Nice today post attack. Jazz festival cancelled, people in shock. Viva la France!

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Promenade des Anglais in Nice today post attack. Jazz festival cancelled, people in shock. Viva la France!

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Promenade des Anglais in Nice today post attack. Jazz festival cancelled, people in shock. Viva la France!

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Aerial scene of the attack ... Promenade des Anglais in Nice ...

From Amanda Sully’s Facebook page: ‘Long live Liberty, Equality & Fraternity’ …

Hobart’s Amanda Sully was in Nice at the time of this appalling attack which has left so many dead. They were on the boulevard when son Elliott, 13, sensed they should leave. They did. Partner Geoff Law was climbing in the Alps ... Her mum was in Milan. • Amanda says ... (on Facebook) ...

• Amanda says ... (on Facebook) ...

Thanks to Elliott’s prescience, we left just before the end of Bastille Day fireworks display on Nice waterfront tonight. Missed attack right where we were standing by a few minutes and now in our little apartment with non stop sirens going off… Thinking of all the lovely people in the crowd near us hurt tonight and one of the killers still on the loose with Nice in lock down.

A FEW HOURS later ...

Yes, Elliott saved our lives last night. It wasn’t a forced we need to go, rather a heartfelt other worldly plea ...

Walking around Nice today were so many disturbing sights. Not least the angry young men in “FCK ISIS” T Shirts furiously looking at and yelling abuse to Muslim people. I understand their anger, you are always on the look out for the next attack, but the blanket judgement’s are almost as terrifying. Every one is on edge. Fighter jets overhead every 10 minutes (ridiculous show of ineffectual power), navy destroyers just off the beach and army and gendarmes on streets. Needless to say ‘Massive Attack’ concert in Nice which I had tickets to has been cancelled. One lesson learned - always listen to children’s fears and intuition.

RODNEY CROOME on Facebook ...

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Seven weeks ago Rafael and I watched the moon rise from the Promenade des Anglais. We experienced Nice as a beautiful, creative, friendly, vivacious multi-cultural city. Those qualities will defy hate and heal the most terrible wounds.

SHIRLEY APTHORP on Facebook ...

I’m in Nice, and Facebook wants me to mark myself as safe. “Are you OK?”, Facebook asks. Are any of us? I am just passing by; it doesn’t feel right to claim any personal part in a tragedy that must feel all too close to those affected. So much out there is not OK.

*Lindsay Tuffin has been a journo since 1969, mainly in Tassie ...

SMH: Nice attack: Up to 80 dead as truck ploughs into crowd

Guardian: Bastille Day truck attack: French president denounces ‘monstrous’ killing of 80 people – live updates

MEANWHILE ... Perhaps (and life is complex and the perpetrator seems to have been an unhinged violent nutter) it all began with George W, Tony Blair and John Howard’s INVASION of Iraq ... Certainly Tassie’s Andrew Wilkie wants Australia to have its own Chilcot Inquiry ...

The Saturday Paper: Andrew Wilkie and the Chilcot inquiry … Late that year, Wilkie decided to betray his government. The more intelligence he saw, the more he realised that the strategic, legal and moral basis for invading Iraq was dubious. A pivotal moment was his preparation of a report on the possible humanitarian consequences of an invasion. This was positioned against humanitarian – and strategic – advantages. Hussein was, by any measure, a capricious and murderous thug who had committed genocide against the Kurds in northern Iraq. But to Wilkie, the calculus seemed clear: the consequences would grimly eclipse any benefit. The whole venture appeared doomed. And yet Wilkie felt none of this was slowing the path to war. 

For leaking against the government, Andrew Wilkie received death threats and lost friends. “I’d do it all again,” he tells me. “Even if I hadn’t won the argument, I’d do it again. The decision I made at the time was correct.”